Historic Putnam County Courthouse Shines Blue in Tribute to Fallen Police Officers during Police Memorial Week

Special Dedication Hosted at Spain Cornerstone Park in Memory of
James J. O’Neill, Founder of the Stephen P. Driscoll Memorial Lodge, FOP
CARMEL, NY – Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell announced today that the historic Putnam County courthouse located on Gleneida Avenue in Carmel, NY, will be lit up in blue in tribute to fallen police officers during Police Memorial Week, May15 – 21, 2017. The courthouse lighting commenced at sundown on Tuesday, May 15th following a special dedication by the Fraternal Order of Police at Spain Cornerstone Park to honor the late James (Jimmy) O’Neill. Jimmy was an icon in the police community and founding president of the Stephen P. Driscoll Memorial Lodge, a chapter of the Fraternal Order of Police.

“This tribute serves to honor the memory of Jimmy O’Neill and all law enforcement professionals who have made the ultimate sacrifice,” said County Executive Odell. “Putnam County is the safest county in New York State and we owe that distinction to our state and local police officers who put their lives on the line everyday to protect and serve our citizens.”

The Fraternal Order of Police dedicated a bench at Spain Cornerstone Park in memory of Jimmy O’Neill.  The granite bench was installed, including an in memoriam plaque and the Irish Prayer, across from the 9/11 Monument located at the site.

“Jimmy’s legacy as a police officer, advocate for law enforcement professionals, and highly valued contributor to the community is deservedly recognized through this dedication,” said Steve Conner, board member, Stephen P. Driscoll Memorial Lodge, Fraternal Order of Police.  “We are honored to have a lasting tribute in Jimmy’s name located at a place very near and dear to his heart.”

Editor’s note: Please see photo captions for attached images.

Photo 5319 – Pictured from left: Kathy O’Neill and Jimmy O’Neill, wife and son, respectively, of James J. O’Neill

Photo 5282 – Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell

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Mosquito Season Is Here: After Heavy Rain, Water Removal Can Reduce Mosquito Populations

Mosquito Season Is Here: After Heavy Rain, Water Removal Can Reduce Mosquito Populations

BREWSTER, NY—The water pools formed after the heavy rainfall of last weekend may soon be teaming with mosquito larva. Already this season, the Putnam County Department of Health (PCDOH) has found and identified Aedes Japonicus mosquitoes, the type that carries West Nile Virus, chikungunya, dengue, and other viruses.

“We have not had a case of West Nile Virus in the county since 2011,” says interim Health Commissioner Michael Nesheiwat, MD, but that could change. Taking measures to reduce mosquito populations is very important. Putnam residents are strongly advised to remove all standing water from their property.”  To date only three cases of chikungunya have been reported in Putnam, all since 2014. Four cases of dengue fever have been reported as well, the most recent in 2012. However, these seven cases were all travel related and not instances of locally acquired infections.

Mosquitoes can breed in anything that collects water in the yard, if left for more than four days. Some mosquitoes, including the Aedes Albopictus, prefer small items like a bottle cap, full of water, in which to breed. Only one lone specimen of A. Albopictus has ever been found in Putnam. While this mosquito has shown to be capable of carrying the Zika virus in a lab, it has not proven itself as a reliable carrier in the real world.

“Checking your yard now and after every rainfall is crucial,” says Robert Morris, PE, MPH, Director of Environmental Health at the Putnam County Department of Health. “Items that trap water—old tires, rain gutters, cups or cans, even leaves and tree holes—may provide a breeding spot. Drill holes in tires or dispose of them properly; clean gutters, and overturn all containers, however small.” Contrary to popular belief, smaller pools of water are more productive for mosquito breeding than larger bodies of water, which have natural mosquito predators such as fish or aquatic insects, such as dragonflies. The PCDOH continues to apply larvicide to targeted road catch basins around the county to reduce breeding locales. This season, like last year, mosquito tracking by the PCDOH and the New York State Department of Health will be increased as well.

Preventing bites of all kinds also should be a top priority.  Personal protection measures are advised for any outdoor activities. Shoes, socks, long pants and long-sleeved shirts are reliable methods. Clothing that is factory-treated with the insecticide permethrin has also been proven effective. Insect repellent containing DEET should also be used as well, paying close attention to the directions provided by the manufacturer. Children should not apply this product themselves—it should be applied for them.

The Department of Health’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

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Disaster Exercise to Safeguard Children Conducted in Putnam County; Health Department, Emergency Services and Community Organizations Rehearse How to Serve the Needs of Youngest Residents

Disaster Exercise to Safeguard Children Conducted in Putnam County; Health Department, Emergency Services and Community Organizations Rehearse How to Serve the Needs of Youngest Residents

BREWSTER, NY—Nearly 60 percent of Putnam households believe they would be reunited with their children within several hours of a major disaster. Yet history has proven otherwise: it took an astounding seven months to reunite the last child with family after Hurricane Katrina. This reality, and the fact that each day, nearly 20,000 children in Putnam County spend the majority of their day at a childcare facility or school, are the reasons behind the disaster preparedness exercise performed by Putnam County’s Community Resilience Coalition on Wednesday, May 3. More than 50 attendees from 28 organizations and agencies participated in the event which ran from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Centennial Golf Club in Carmel.

“This exercise brings a deeper understanding of how our Putnam organizations and agencies interact during an emergency,” said County Executive MaryEllen Odell.  “By providing an opportunity for our child-serving institutions to partner with local emergency responders, we improve communication and response to support and protect the children of our community.”

To better address the unique needs of children, the local Community Resilience Coalition (CRC), an official subcommittee of the longstanding Disaster Preparedness Task Force of Putnam County, conducted a discussion-based, “tabletop” exercise to test the assumptions, protocols and resources of child-serving institutions and key community stakeholders who may interact with children before, during, and after an emergency.

“The purpose of the exercise was to envision all the possibilities that could happen and then to decide how we, as community organizations, would handle it,” said Commissioner Anthony Sutton of the Bureau of Emergency Services of Putnam County. “By talking through the steps of a specified scenario, we identify where the gaps are and how best to fill them.” The scenario that was played out involved a major earthquake with direct damage in Putnam County, causing evacuation at some childcare and other essential facilities, and limiting availability of state and federal resources.

More than 65% of American households do not have an adequate emergency plan, and nearly half have none at all. Additionally, 45% of Putnam households believe help will arrive in under an hour in the event of a large-scale, unanticipated disaster, indicating a widespread sense of unrealistic expectations and false security. Furthermore in Putnam County, 41% of households are not familiar

with their child’s daycare or school evacuation and emergency plan. These statistics collectively support the notion that if disaster were to strike, many communities would be underprepared to protect children.

This exercise is a component of the national Resilient Children/Resilient Communities Initiative (RCRC), a partnership between the National Center for Disaster Preparedness (NCDP) at Columbia University’s Earth Institute and Save the Children (STC) funded by a grant from GSK. Putnam County is one of two pilot communities in the U.S. working on the RCRC Initiative.

The players in the exercise included representatives from schools, child care and after-school programs, law enforcement, public health and healthcare, emergency management and first responders, and other various government and community organizations.

“Strengthening the link between emergency management and child-serving institutions ultimately improves all emergency plans, in addition to sharpening our response and recovery action,” said interim Health Commissioner Michael J. Nesheiwat, MD.

Barbara Garbarino, project liaison for the CRC, who previously worked for the Child Care Council of Dutchess and Putnam, Inc., further explained that, “When childcare facilities are better prepared to take care of their children in an emergency, it not only frees responders to help others in need, but it also helps ensure children will recover more readily after the crisis. Children do best when their normal routines resume as quickly as possible.”

“An exercise like this better prepares local counties to anticipate and meet the unique needs of children,” said Jeff Schlegelmilch, deputy director of the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University’s Earth Institute. “This is one of many activities of the Community Resilience Coalition that serves as a model for other communities looking to do this kind of work.”

The exercise scenario was collaboratively developed with input, advice, and assistance from a multi-agency exercise planning team. This exercise followed the guidance set forth by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and is compliant with Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) protocols and standards.

To learn more about Putnam’s CRC, visit the web page: http://www.putnamcountyny.com/health/community-resilience-coalition/.

About the Resilient Children/ Resilient Communities Initiative

The Resilient Children/Resilient Communities Initiative (RCRC) is funded by a grant from GSK and is led by the National Center for Disaster Preparedness in partnership with Save the Children. Launched in 2015, the three-year RCRC initiative has brought together local stakeholders in two pilot communities in New York and Arkansas to create emergency plans that meet the substantial needs of children in disasters. It has also established a national panel of experts to link the community work with preparedness priorities of communities throughout the United States. Learn more about the initiative here: http://ncdp.columbia.edu/rcrc

About Putnam County Department of Health (PCDOH)

The Department of Health’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

About Putnam County Bureau of Emergency Services (BES)

The BES mission is to keep county residents safe from harm, by providing services to all fire, EMS and related emergency management initiatives. This includes training and equipping special teams for fire investigation, police response and hazardous materials mitigation, and a credible assessment team (CAT). Additionally, BES maintains a countywide communications system and continually seeks ways to improve response to both natural and manmade disasters. For more information, please visit the Bureau of Emergency Services website at http://www.putnamcountyny.com/pcbes.

MEDIA CONTACTS: 

 

 

Tick Season is Back; Experts Predict Increase in Tick-borne Illnesses this Year

Tick Season is Back;

Experts Predict Increase in Tick-borne Illnesses this Year

BREWSTER, NY— The recent mild winter, together with an unusually large population of mice last year, have experts thinking there will be increased numbers of ticks and the diseases they carry this season. A single mouse can carry up to 100 infected ticks on its tiny ears and face.

“Unfortunately, it is not only Lyme disease we are concerned about,” says interim Health Commissioner Michael J. Nesheiwat, MD. “There are other illnesses carried by ticks and we are seeing increases in all of them. Our number-one line of defense has been, and still is, preventing tick bites in the first place.”

More than a dozen tick-borne illnesses have been identified by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention, including five that infect residents in the Hudson Valley region. Lyme disease is the most common and the most well-known, but anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis and babesiosis are present as well and appear to be on the increase. Powassan disease, a rarer and potentially deadly infection, is also carried by the same black-legged tick (commonly referred to as a deer tick) that transmits Lyme disease, anaplasmosis and babesiosis.

To prevent these illnesses, residents should take extra care this summer when outside, especially in wooded or brushy areas with high grass and leaf litter. Young or nymphal ticks develop in the spring and their tiny size makes them more difficult to see. They feed primarily on white-footed mice, which may be infected with Lyme or other bacteria. The nymphal ticks then go on to bite and infect humans. Infected squirrels and birds can also serve as hosts, or go-betweens, to spread the disease to ticks. Deer play a role as well, by providing a third and final blood meal that the tick needs in order to reproduce.

Unfortunately tick-borne illnesses can be challenging to diagnose. If a blood test is performed too early, the results may come back negative when the person has in fact contracted the infection. The test is only negative because the patient’s antibodies have not reached a level high enough to be detected, which takes approximately one week. A physician makes a diagnosis based on a combination of available tests, his or her observation of the patient, along with a patient history and description of symptoms. The only way an absolute diagnosis of Lyme disease can be made is in a patient with the unmistakable bullseye rash, which occurs in only 70 to 80 percent of infected individuals.

Making the situation worse, a small percentage of patients who do contract Lyme disease

may have lingering symptoms of fatigue, joint pain or muscle aches, lasting 6 months or more

after completing treatment. The cause of this condition, sometimes called chronic Lyme disease, but more

accurately described as post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome, is not completely understood.

“Patients may not recall a tick bite, and early symptoms, when antibiotics are most effective, are

non-specific or similar to other viral illnesses,” continues Dr. Nesheiwat. “Not all patients get the telltale bullseye rash with Lyme. That’s why preventing bites is so important.”

Research shows that using insect repellent with 20 percent or more of DEET (chemical name, N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide), performing frequent tick checks and wearing protective clothing are effective methods to reduce a person’s chance of infection. As a result, even in spring and summer when the weather is warm, shoes and socks, along with long pants and long-sleeved shirts are advised in areas where ticks are common. Clothing that is factory-treated with the insecticide permethrin has proven highly effective in deterring tick bites in research studies as well. Treated clothing is commercially available, as is a spray that can be applied on one’s own clothing. These may be worth considering if much time is spent in risky environments. If clothes are untreated, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends placing them in a dryer on high for at least ten minutes to kill any ticks that may have been brought in from outside. Damp clothing may need up to one hour of drying to rid them of ticks—simply washing clothes does not work.

Full tick checks are also advised. Ticks crawl upwards—they don’t fly or jump. They instinctively move up to attach around the scalp, neck or ears, where skin is naturally thinner and where animals and people alike, have more trouble finding and dislodging them. Places to especially check are behind the knees, around the groin area, underarms, head, neck and ears. If a tick is found attached, it should be removed at once with fine-tipped tweezers. Application of petroleum jelly, alcohol or other substance is not advised and may increase infection risk. Studies done on mice show that removal within 24 hours provided 100 percent protection from Lyme disease transmission and removal at 48 hours provided 63 percent protection. No protection was found with removal after 66 hours of attachment.

In Dutchess County to Putnam’s north, where tick-borne illnesses are similarly high, a five-year study has begun to test if neighborhood-based prevention efforts can reduce human cases of tick-related diseases. Two tick control methods will be tested. The first applies a low dose of fipronil, a tick medicine used on dogs and cats to kill their ticks, onto mice and chipmunks; the second involves applying a spray on vegetation to eliminate ticks. The spray, developed from a naturally occurring fungus, is safe for people, pets and the environment. Called the “Tick Project,” this research may formulate a neighborhood-based plan that can reduce these diseases, since no human vaccine is available.

If you think you have been bitten by a tick and develop symptoms within a few weeks, you should visit your healthcare provider as soon as possible. The most common symptoms include fever/chills, aches and pains, and a skin rash. Your provider will evaluate your symptoms and order diagnostic tests if indicated. For more details, visit the CDC’s webpage on “Symptoms of Tick-borne Illnesses.”

The Department of Health’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

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NYMTIC: PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD AND PUBLIC REVIEW MEETINGS FOR DRAFT PLAN 2045, CONGESTION MANAGEMENT REPORT, AND TRANSPORTATION CONFORMITY DETERMINATION

NYMTC announces an opportunity for the public to offer comments and attend various public review
meetings for the draft of its new Regional Transportation Plan (Plan 2045), related Congestion Management
Process (CMP) Status Report and the draft Transportation Conformity Determination for the Plan and the 2017-2021 Transportation Improvement Program.

The 30-day public comment period will begin on May 1, 2017 and ends at 4 p.m. on
May 30, 2017. All the documents will be available for download at www.nymtc.org.

Public review meetings will be held throughout the region:

CLICK THIS LINK TO DOWNLOAD FLYER

or View Flyer Below!

Putnam County Golf Course Announces Season Opening

Putnam County Golf Course Announces Season Opening

By – Jim Woods, PGA

MAHOPAC, NY (April xx, 2017) – Putnam County announces the official start of the Golf Season at the Putnam County Golf Course. Open to golfers of all levels, the Putnam County Golf Course offers special rates to seniors and Putnam County residents, as well as  golf passes that will cover golfers’ green fees for the season.

“After the long winter, golfers need to get out in the fresh air and shake off the rust from their swing,” says Jim Woods, PGA Golf Pro. “I’ll be offering private lessons at the course or folks can register for one of our adult classes or junior summer camps. We also offer a Putnam Golf League that runs Wednesday nights at 5:00 all summer long, so please contact us if you’re interested in playing or becoming a sub.”

The Putnam County Golf course features 18 holes of championship golf, practice range and putting green, and a fully stocked golf shop. Golfers and visitors can also enjoy a beverage or meal while they refresh, relax and socialize before or after a game at The Grille at The Fairways.

Golfers should book their reservations online at www.putnamcountygolfcourse.com or by calling the golf shop, 845-808-1880, ext. 2, as tee times get booked early.

 

Golf Shop Hours

  • April 15th – September 10th – 6:30 AM – 6:00 PM Daily
  • May 20th – July 30th – 6:00 AM – Weekends Only

 

First Starting Time

  • April 15th – September 10th – 7:00 AM
  • May 20th – July 30th – 6:30 AM Weekends Only

Putnam County Golf Course
187 Hill St. – Mahopac – NY – 10541

PGA Professional – Jim Woods
jimw@putnamcountygc.com

845-808-1880 X3

New Health Department Initiative Helps Prevent Environmental Problems and Saves Water

New Health Department Initiative Helps Prevent Environmental Problems and Saves Water

Brewster, NY—Earth Day 2017 is over and Earth Month is ending. However, protecting the environment is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year responsibility and springtime brings a special challenge. Melting snow and April showers saturate the ground and rates of septic failures typically rise as a result. This spring the Putnam County Department of Health is launching a pilot program that may prevent some of these failures from happening by offering homeowners free toilet leak detection tablets and easy-to-follow instructions.

“Preserving our wonderful Putnam County environment is always a priority,” says County Executive MaryEllen Odell. “It fosters a healthy community and in this case, it also helps residents on an individual level. This new program saves water, and by uncovering hidden leaks, it has the potential to save homeowners thousands of dollars that it would cost to replace a septic system.”

“Many residents may not realize that septic system failures are a public health hazard, with the potential to cause serious illness, injury or even death,” explains interim Health Commissioner Michael J. Nesheiwat, MD. “Unfortunately, the number of required septic repairs continues to increase as older systems reach the end of their useful life. The health department oversees a variety of septic-related activities including approving repair permits, licensing and training repair contractors and responding to septic complaints so that the public is adequately protected. ”

Homeowners interested in participating in the pilot program can stop by the health department to pick up the tablets and instructions, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Summer hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.) They will be asked to provide an email address so that a short follow-up survey can be emailed. The tablets are dropped into the tank of a toilet. If the non-toxic dye leaks into the bowl without a flush, it indicates a leakage.

“The problem is you can’t always hear a leak,” says Robert Morris, PE, MPH, director of environmental health services at the health department. “Most people are familiar with the noise a toilet makes when it is ‘running,’ but this only occurs when a large enough amount of water escapes. You can have a smaller leak that you can’t hear, and it can still cause a septic failure.”

If a leak is detected, an inexpensive, $15 kit to replace the flush-valve assembly can be purchased at a hardware store. Either the homeowner or a plumber can replace it, potentially averting a much larger and more expensive problem.

For advice or more information about the program, call the health department at 808-1390, or visit the office at 1 Geneva Road in Brewster.

The Department of Health’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

April 22 is Earth Day, Time to Recommit to Protecting our Planet

April 22 is Earth Day, Time to Recommit to Protecting our Planet

PCDOH Staff Volunteer Time to Commemorate Day with Early Clean-up and More

Brewster, NY—When Earth Day began April 22 in 1970, there was no Clean Air Act, no Clean Water Act and no Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Since then many successes have been won, but some of the largest challenges still lie ahead.

This year Earth Day Network has proclaimed a campaign for environmental and climate literacy. Tackling great challenges begins with smaller local steps. On Friday, April 21, Putnam County Department of Health staff will be out in the community at lunchtime, volunteering and cleaning roadside litter along the stretch of Route 312 near the main health department office. Additionally beginning Sunday, April 16, the department will be tweeting and posting information daily to spread the word and improve environmental and climate literacy.

“Roadside litter is more than an eyesore,” explains Vicki DiLonardo, the health department’s recycling coordinator. “It can harm wildlife and damage the water supply, and the quantity of roadside litter is staggering. Last year, the litter patrol operated by the PARC organization collected more than 26,000 pounds from 493 miles of Putnam County roadside.”

To reduce roadside litter, the health department runs a program that lends community members clean-up kits, complete with litter bags, litter “grabbers,” roadside safety instructions, safety vests and highway flags. Roadside cleanups are a great activity for community groups and neighborhood associations. Park and school campus cleanups are great community service projects for girl scouts, boy scouts and other youth organizations. For more information or to borrow a “clean-up kit,” contact the health department at 808-1390.

The litter clean-up program is one of a number of environmental improvement initiatives the health department spearheads. Last September the department launched a campaign to increase plastic film recycling in the county. Unlike bottles and cans, plastic film must be dropped off at a store that collects it. Currently 25 drop-off spots in the county are required to collect plastic film, which includes store “carry-out’ bags, shrink-wrap plastic (e.g. beverage cases, paper towels packs) and newspaper delivery bags.

Other environmental initiatives and events in Putnam County include a push for more residential composting, an easy and convenient way to reduce solid waste, and the Household Hazardous Waste Collection Days sponsored by the health department and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. These events provide a way for residents to safely dispose of environmentally hazardous materials (e.g. cleaners, pesticides, oil-based paint, automotive solvents, mothballs, gasoline, small propane tanks). The next one is scheduled for Saturday, May 6, in Fahnestock State Park. Electronic waste is not accepted at Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day. To get rid of “e-waste,” residents should call their local town for disposal instructions. To register for Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day, or for information on any other of these programs, call the department at 808-1390 or visit the website below.

For more information on the Earth Day Network, which brings together 55 environmental organizations and government agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, visit www.earthday.org.

The Department of Health’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

 

PUTNAM COUNTY CLERK MICHAEL BARTOLOTTI AND COUNTY EXECUTIVE MARYELLEN ODELL BOOST ORGAN DONATION

PUTNAM COUNTY CLERK MICHAEL BARTOLOTTI AND COUNTY EXECUTIVE MARYELLEN ODELL BOOST ORGAN DONATION

For Release:  Immediate (April 19, 2017)

Contact:  Michael C. Bartlotti, 845-808-1142, Extension 49301

Putnam County Clerk Michael C. Bartolotti and County Executive MaryEllen Odell will be partnering with the New York Alliance for Donation (NYAD) to promote organ, eye and tissue donation in Putnam County.  This program is responsible for saving and improving the lives of thousands of New Yorkers in dire need of transplants.

“April is National Donate Life month, and we are delighted to continue working with NYAD on a countywide basis to encourage residents to become an organ or tissue donor.”  Mr. Bartolotti said, “Putnam County is proud to be one of the many counties throughout the state participating in this important program and I am pleased to partner with County Executive Odell in bringing this program to the attention of our residents.”

There are over 19 million New Yorkers; yet only 28% of adults in New York State are registered donors, compared to the national average of more than 50%.  In New York alone, the number of men, women and children waiting for a transplant is over 10,000.  While 37% of Putnam County residents are registered donors, we believe we can do better!

Mr. Bartolotti will be placing brochures and posters in the Putnam County DMV alerting customers of the donor crisis and asking them to enroll on the Life Registry.  Interested customers can also enroll by checking off the organ donor box on any license or non-driver ID card transaction (MV-44).

“21 people die every day due to the lack of available organs.  98% of New Yorkers enroll in the New York State Donate Life Registry through local DMV offices which makes our efforts on this behalf even more important.”  County Executive Odell said, “We can make a significant difference in increasing the numbers of donors through our constant contact with residents, and I am happy to work alongside County Clerk Bartolotti and NYAD to make their goal of a significantly increased registry a reality.”

 

Start the Journey to a Smoke-Free Life: Freedom from Smoking Program Begins May 8

Start the Journey to a Smoke-Free Life:
Freedom from Smoking Program Begins May 8

BREWSTER, NY- Smoking is an addiction—and a difficult one to overcome. For some smokers, unsuccessful attempts at quitting have led them to believe that they are unable to quit. Becoming a nonsmoker is a journey. Most people have tried to quit, even more than once, before they find ultimate success. Although the first steps can be hard, finding your path to becoming a nonsmoker is easier with the right help. This spring, the Putnam County Department of Health will be offering the Freedom from Smoking (FFS) Program, a proven way to quit smoking for good.

“We’re always looking for ways to help our residents,” said County Executive MaryEllen Odell, “and for those who want to quit smoking, this new service provided by the health department offers extra support.”

“You are never too old to quit,” said Michael Nesheiwat, MD, Interim Health Commissioner. “Even if you’ve smoked for a long time, there are great health benefits to quitting. It may take multiple attempts, but you should keep trying. The next time might be your success.”

FFS is an evidence-based program that has helped hundreds of thousands of smokers quit since it was first introduced over thirty years ago. Eight weekly classes, each lasting 60 to 90 minutes, are led by a certified facilitator. The program covers planning and preparing to quit, as well as lifestyle changes that will support maintenance. Use of Nicotine Replacement Products (NRT) is encouraged as part of the program, but is optional.

The FFS program will be held at the Bureau of Emergency Services, 112 Old Route 6 in Carmel, on Mondays from 6 pm to 7:30 pm, beginning May 8. Free NRT will be offered to participants while supply lasts. Pre-registration is required, as group size is limited. For more information or to pre-register, contact the Putnam County Department of Health at (845) 808-1390, ext. 43258.

The Department of Health’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.