Putnam’s September 11th Candle Light Vigil

Putnam County’s Annual September 11th Candle Light Vigil will be held on Friday September 11, 2020 at the Putnam Heroes Memorial located at Cornerstone Park, Carmel. With an abundance of caution, due to the COVID 19 Pandemic and its potential health hazards, the Putnam Heroes Memorial Committee has decided to live stream this year’s ceremony on the internet. 

The Ceremony will start at 8:00pm. Cornerstone Park will be closed and only be open to those involved in the actual Ceremony and its production. It is estimated that Cornerstone Park will be closed from 6:00pm until the conclusion of the Ceremony. 

This year we will be adding one name to our Memorial; Commissioner Robert McMahon, Putnam County Bureau of Emergency Services. We will also be dedicating a tree that was a seedling from the World Trade Center Survivor Tree to the healthcare workers, emergency and essential services and the volunteers who fought and kept us healthy, safe and sustained. In addition, we will also remember those who passed as a result of this pandemic. 

St. James the Apostle Church will be having its September 11th Mass of Remembrance at 7:00pm. The Mass will also be live streamed, with no congregants at the service. The site for the September Candle Light Vigil is: www.putnamcountyny.com/911candlelightvigil 

The site for the Mass of Remembrance is Youtube St James the Apostle Church Carmel NY. 

It is recommended that you sign into the sites prior to the start. 

In the event of any technical difficulties the Ceremony will be available for viewing on www.putnamcountyny.com/911candlelightvigil after the service.

It is encouraged that you watch the Mass and/or the Candle Light Vigil from the safety of your home.

Putnam County Foreclosure tax foreclosure auction WILL ONLY BE ONLINE starting August 31, 2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Putnam County Foreclosure tax foreclosure auction WILL ONLY BE ONLINE starting August 31, 2020

Due to NYS COVID-19 Mandates Related to Mass Gathering Restrictions, the Putnam County Tax Auction will be converted to STRICTLY ONLINE BIDDING ONLY.

The Putnam County Commissioner of Finance said, “this is the safest method for Putnam County to proceed with its tax foreclosure auction process and remain in compliance with New York State mandates.”

All registrations will be completed online. We are requiring ALL BIDDERS, EVEN IF YOU HAVE REGISTERED ONLINE FOR THE LIVE AUCTION ALREADY to Fully Complete and Return the “ONLINE BIDDER REGISTRATION PACKET” to the office of Collar City Auctions Realty & Mgmt, Inc. as soon as possible via online forms or we suggest overnight delivery with tracking. Unfortunately, bidders are not eligible for bidding approval until your completed bid packet is received and you will then be manually approved and provided with bidding privileges.

For further information please contact: Please visit site at www.collarcityauctionsonline.com to register and complete the “Online Bidder Registration Packet”. Please complete Online Bidder Registration Packages to putnamCoReg@collarcityauctions.com send via USPS, Overnight or via Courier to: Collar City Auctions Realty & Mgmt, Inc. 9423 Western Tpke Delanson, NY 12053-2105 Questions: Please email PutnamCoReg@collarcityauctions.com or call our office Monday – Friday 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM (EST) 518-895-8150

Putnam County is in an enhanced risk for severe thunderstorms this afternoon into this evening. Wind gusts of 60 MPH or more and large hail are likely. An isolated tornado may also be possible

Overview
The National Weather Service has notified us that we are in an enhanced risk for severe
thunderstorms this afternoon (8/27/20) into this evening. Severe thunderstorms can produce
wind gusts of 60 MPH or higher with large (2” or larger diameter) hail possible. There is also the
possibility of isolated supercells which can produce wind gusts of 75 MPH or greater and golf to
tennis ball sized hail.

County Response

Putnam County Emergency Operations Center (EOC)
The EOC is currently at Level 3. The Office of Emergency Management staff will continue to
monitor conditions and provide public information

Traffic and Road Conditions
Putnam County Sheriff’s Office reports that we are seeing normal traffic patterns.

County Facilities
All County facilities are on their appropriate normal working schedule

Utilities
NYSEG – Storm Response Team is monitoring weather forecast, planning and readying crews
and equipment. Crews have been pre-deployed to areas expected to be impacted

Bureau of Emergency Services
Putnam County 9-1-1 is fully staffed. The public is reminded that 9-1-1 should only be used for
EMERGENCY requests for Police, Fire or EMS.

Highways and Facilities
Highway crews have been notified and are ready to respond
Closing

  • Keep a flashlight and fresh batteries handy.
  • If you rely on electricity to operate a well pump, fill your bathtub for an extra water reserve.
  • Ensure adequate supplies of prescription medicine and other necessities.
  • Keep your cell phone fully charged.
  • Fuel up your vehicles.
  • Have a plan to check on vulnerable neighbors and family members.
  • Stock water and non-perishable foods that require no refrigeration or cooking.

Please monitor NY-Alert and www.putnamcountyny.gov for updates.

Preparedness 2020: Masks, sanitizers and thermometers are added to supply kits and back-to school lists

BREWSTER, NY—Being prepared is a long-established mantra for emergency readiness advocates everywhere. Each September FEMA, as the Federal Emergency Management Administration is more commonly known, creates an annual theme for National Preparedness Month. For 2020 it is “Disasters don’t wait, make your plan today.” In the age of COVID, being prepared takes on new considerations and potential consequences as additional items, such as extra masks, hand sanitizers and thermometers, should be added to supply lists. 

“There were some amazing stories of neighbors helping neighbors with our recent tropical storm Isaias and the Putnam County agencies pulled together, going above and beyond, as they always do,” said MaryEllen Odell, Putnam County Executive. “For individual residents and families, discussing how to best communicate during times of emergencies or disaster, and having a primary plan and a back-up is the best advice.”

Health Commissioner Michael J. Nesheiwat, MD, agreed, adding “This has been a year like no other, and as September approaches and families prepare to send their children back to school, they are adding masks, sanitizers and now thermometers to not only their preparedness kits, but also to their back-to school routines. Having a thermometer and a back-up thermometer, and creating a routine to ensure you are able to assess the health of your family is especially important as we make plans to reopen our schools safely.”

Preparedness kits or disaster kits are sometimes also called “go kits,” especially when they are assembled in a duffle bag or other easy-to-carry sack or backpack that may be necessary if authorities are urging evacuation. FEMA’s Ready.gov website has a handy list of basic supplies to include in your emergency kit, along with more specific suggestions, and how to maintain your kit. Ready.gov also has tips for creating an emergency plan and lists the disasters or emergency situations that you can prepare for in your plan. 

“We prepare by conducting numerous drills throughout the year so we are ready when an emergency or disaster happens, and we urge residents to prepare as well by having extra supplies and a communications plan” said Ken Clair, Putnam’s Commissioner of Emergency Services. “Isaias was the ninth tropical storm of the hurricane season, and there were many downed trees and power outages. An enormous amount of work needed to be done, and our team got it done.”

County Executive MaryEllen Odell also credits teamwork for the successful recovery, saying “Our county highway and local highway crews, law enforcement, fire departments, town hall staff,  as well as our senior services, social services and legislature, all rallied together and pushed to keep residents safe and complete the necessary work.”

To start or update a personal or family emergency plan, FEMA’s website is the place to start. Visit: https://www.ready.gov/plan.

The mission of the Putnam County Department of Health, nationally accredited by the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB), is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services, provided directly and through collaboration, include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our county website at www.putnamcountyny.gov; or visit our social media sites @PutnamHealthNY on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.  

HEALTH ALERT If you worked at or attended the 10am Mass at St. James Church in Carmel, NY on August 23 You may have been exposed to COVID-19.

HEALTH ALERT

If you worked at or attended the 10am Mass at
St. James Church
in Carmel, NY on August 23

You may have been exposed to COVID-19.

A member of the public who has tested positive for COVID-19 visited the church during this time.
Please watch for symptoms of COVID-19 which include fever, chills, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea.
Contact your physician with any concerns.

Please visit our website for testing information www.putnamcountyny.com/health/coronavirus/
If you have any questions, please contact the Putnam County Department of Health at 845-808-1390.

HEALTH ALERT If you worked at or visited ShopRite Supermarket, 184 NY-52 in Carmel, NY on August 23 from 1pm-3pm You may have been exposed to COVID-19.

HEALTH ALERT

If you worked at or visited ShopRite Supermarket, 184 NY-52 in Carmel, NY on August 23 from 1pm-3pm You may have been exposed to COVID-19.

A member of the public who has tested positive for COVID-19 visited the supermarket during this time.

Please watch for symptoms of COVID-19 which include fever, chills, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea.

Contact your physician with any concerns.
Please visit our website for testing information www.putnamcountyny.com/health/coronavirus/
If you have any questions, please contact the Putnam County Department of Health at 845-808-1390.

Breakdown of positive cases by towns in Putnam County 8/21/2020

8-21 WEEKLY DASHBOARD

Remembering Marjorie Addis, Suffragist to Editor-in-Chief, and everything in between

In the fall of 1917, Marjorie Lobdell Addis marched into Central Park in New York City carrying a banner and the list of enrollments for Putnam County Suffragists.  Alongside Mrs. C.A. Hopkins, Miss Kate de F. Crane, Miss May Fowler and  her sister, Barbara Addis, Marjorie Addis was part of a local contingent of New York women fighting for their right to vote.  The Women’s Parade for Freedom was considered one of the most important events in the Suffrage Movement and “the most striking and significant parade ever seen in New York City” according to The Brewster Standard.

This week marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, and reflection on the women that worked tirelessly to further the equality and rights of women locally and nationwide puts Marjorie Addis in the forefront.  Born in Brewster on September 11, 1890, “Marj” as she was known to family and friends, was a 1907 graduate of Brewster High school and Smith College in 1911.  She received a master’s degree at Columbia University School of Business and attended New York University Law School.

Her dedication to public service didn’t stop with equal voting rights for women.  In 1918, while working for Edith Diehl as her secretary at the Woman’s Land Army in Wellesley, Massachusetts,  Marge was called to Federal service, appointed confidential secretary to Dr. H. W. Draper, Assistant Surgeon-General of the United States Public Health Service, who was sent by President Wilson to direct the campaign to stamp out the flu pandemic in Massachusetts.

In 1922, Addis came back to Brewster for good following the unexpected death of her father Emerson W. Addis, publisher and editor of The Brewster Standard.  Never one to back down from a challenge, Marj, along with her brother, dedicated her life to providing fair and honest news to her community.  In a 1976 interview with Jane McMahon of The Reporter Dispatch, she describes her early newspaper days when she was met with great opposition from the Ku Klux Klan, “They broke my window because we supported the repeal of Prohibition.”   She also resigned from the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) in 1939 after African American contralto Marian Anderson was turned away from performing in Constitution Hall because of her race.

In addition to running the paper, Marj continued to represent the Village of Brewster and Town of Southeast as a founding member of the Women’s Republican Club of Putnam County, a trustee of the Brewster Library, member of the District Nursing Association, and supporter of the Southeast Museum.

Alexandra Johnson, niece of Marjorie Addis and part-time Brewster resident, has fond memories of her Aunt Marj and of events in the Village of Brewster.  She says her aunt rarely, if ever, reflected on the early days. “She was humble, I never knew she was a suffragist and she never spoke of her work the Women’s Land Army, Red Cross, or Victory Gardens either.”

“My Aunt Marj was an acquaintance of Eleanor Roosevelt, and one time Mrs. Roosevelt came to speak at the Wells Casino in Brewster,” says Johnson, “Aunt Marj told me to go sit on the sidewalk with my dog Taffy and wait, because Mrs. Roosevelt loves dogs.  So, I did, and sure enough, Eleanor Roosevelt walked down the path toward me, patted my dog on the head and chatted with me. I will always remember that day.”

16 year-old Brewster High School junior, Skye Johnson along with her 13 year-old brother Samuel, can appreciate what their great-grandaunt contributed to the movement and her community. “I’m proud to have such an interesting history to my family. She obviously did something very important for women,” says Skye.

Southeast Museum Director, Amy Campanaro adds,  “The Brewster Standard, under Marjorie Addis’ direction, captured the everyday lives of community members, as well as the community’s reaction to local and national events.  This created the best gift a historical researcher could wish for, a complete picture of who we were as a community and how we rose to challenges.”

Marjorie Addis died on her 95th birthday in 1985 and The Putnam County Courier stated in her obituary; “Miss Addis was known for her independent thinking and her strong principles, which were evident in her editorial policies.”

Thanks to these principals, Marjorie Lobdell Addis contributed to many worthy causes, from women’s right to vote, to responsible journalism, and everything in between.

 

Image caption/credit

Samuel (13) and Skye (16) Johnson hold The Town of Southeast Bicentennial book, featuring their relative, Marjorie Addis.  Photo courtesy of Erik Johnson.

 

An undated image of Marjorie Addis sitting at her desk in The Brewster Standard office. Photo courtesy of The Southeast Museum.

Full Volume Test for Indian Point Sirens Set for Wednesday, August 26th, 2020, at 6:00 PM

Entergy is conducting a full-volume test of the Indian Point siren system in Westchester, Rockland, Orange and Putnam counties on Wednesday, August 26th, at approximately 6:00 PM.
During the test the sirens will sound for four minutes. WHUD Radio (100.7 FM) will test the Emergency Alert System immediately following the siren test.

County officials will use the siren system to alert the public during an emergency at Indian Point. A sample of the Siren Sounds can be found at our website. www.putnamcountyny.com/pcbes/oem/indian-point/
In an actual emergency, all the sirens would sound at full volume for four minutes. Sirens are not a signal to evacuate; but to alert the public to tune to their local Emergency Alert System (EAS) radio or TV station for important information. The EAS stations are listed in the booklet “Are you Ready ? Putnam County Indian Point: Emergency Guide,” which was distributed, as well as available online.

For additional information on this siren test:

Visit www.safesecurevital.org

Information on Indian Point emergency planning is on the New York Alert website:
https://alert.ny.gov/indian-point

 

the historic Putnam County Courthouse will be lit in yellow, white and purple on Wednesday, August 26 to mark the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, which gave women the right to vote

Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell announced that the historic Putnam County Courthouse will be lit in yellow, white and purple on Wednesday, August 26 to mark the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, which gave women the right to vote.

“If not for the brave women who fought long and hard for suffrage, women would have no voice in the political arena, much less the opportunity to run for and hold elective office,” County Executive Odell said. “All of the rights we, as women, hold today stem from that first battle. As Putnam’s first female county executive, I am proud to ensure that our courthouse is lit in remembrance of and gratitude for the suffragettes who led the way.”

After years of protest marches, civil disobedience and lobbying led by women like Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott and Susan B. Anthony, the 19th Amendment was ratified on August 18, 1920. It was certified on August 26, 1920 and that is the day that is celebrated as Women’s Equality Day.

“Here in Putnam County, the Suffrage Movement was led by a mighty group of women – rich and poor – who worked tirelessly, to further the equality and rights of women locally and nationwide,” said Jennifer Cassidy, of the Putnam County Historian’s Office. “They are names we still recognize today—Addison Hopkins, Edith Diehl, Helena Fish, Marjorie Addis, and so many more.”

The colors of the Suffrage Movement were yellow, white and purple.