How to Combat COVID Fatigue and Protect Yourself and Your Loved Ones

After months of restrictions put in place to protect New York State residents from COVID-19, many people are feeling “pandemic fatigue,” especially facing the holidays ahead. The coronavirus pandemic is still going strong, and in many places resurging. It is normal to become weary of the necessary precautions to slow the spread of disease. Here is how to combat COVID fatigue and still protect yourself and your loved ones:

  • Acknowledge your feelings.
    It is normal to feel tired, frustrated, worried, mad, sad and all the other emotions in between. Let yourself feel them, write them down, talk to a loved one about them, or reach out to a mental health professional if you are struggling. The COVID-19 Emotional Support Hotline is available for NYS residents and can be reached at 1-844-863-9314.
  • Reframe your thinking.
    Shift from ‘I have to stay home’ to ‘I’m lucky I can stay home to protect myself and my family.’
    Treat your mask as an accessory or a way to express yourself instead of as something you have to wear.
  • Stay connected with others– distantly.
    A phone call or video call is a great way to stay connected. Although it does not replace a face-to-face conversation, technology can help us feel together when it is best to be apart.
  • Reduce stress by taking care of your physical health.
    Getting enough sleep, eating healthy foods, and exercising regularly can improve your mood and outlook. Limiting your alcohol intake can also improve your mood.
  • Rely on trusted news sources for information.
    Staying informed is important, but too much information can add to your COVID fatigue. Use reliable news sources and be mindful of social media, where disinformation can spread quickly.

Putnam residents have sacrificed too much and have come too far to give up now. By continuing to take extra precautions to slow the spread of the coronavirus, the curve can be flattened again.

For the Holidays, Limited Edition Local History Gifts

November 25, 2020, Brewster, NY – The Putnam County Historian’s Office has released a holiday gift guide with two limited edition items direct from the Archives, gifts sure to please any fan of local history.

“The 1829 David H. Burr map of Dutchess and Putnam counties is a really unique gift idea,” says Melinda Miller of the Historian’s Office.  “It is based on the oldest original map in our collection and it is a beautiful piece of local history!”

The color print map of the counties of Dutchess and Putnam features town lines by color, stage roads, county roads, villages, post office, flouring mills, manufacturers, forges, marble quarries, sawmills, and churches. The New York and Albany railroad lines, lakes, creeks, ponds, and mountain areas are included on the map, as well as a 1300-foot high notation at Sugar Loaf Hill in Philipstown.

The original map, now secured in the Putnam County Archives, was digitized by The Highland Studio, a family owned and operated business in Cold Spring, New York.  “They are our go-to in Putnam County for the highest quality scanning and professional treatment of our important and sometimes fragile maps and images,” says Miller.

In 2020, a limited number of 24 x 36-inch reprints were authorized by Putnam County Clerk Michael Bartolotti who is also the Records Management Officer and oversees the Archives.  Large format printing was executed by another family-run Putnam County business, Millennium Printing & Graphics in Brewster, New York.

The high-quality prints are available this holiday season in black or brown frames for $54.99 and available for pick up and by appointment only at the Historian’s Office, located at 68 Marvin Avenue in Brewster, NY.  Prints can be ordered for $29.99 (includes first class USPS shipping).

For those looking for a smaller sized gift, the limited edition of the Collaborative History of Putnam County, New York is a great resource book for new and old county residents alike. This hard cover book, produced by the Putnam County government to celebrate the County’s 200th birthday in 2012, contains over 375 pages of local history.  It is on sale this holiday season for $25.00 (includes USPS media mail shipping).

“The nice thing about this holiday offering is that proceeds to the map sales go to preservation efforts for the Historian’s Collection and historic marker restoration throughout Putnam County,” says Miller.   “We’re happy to offer a unique, safe and socially distanced gift buying opportunity this holiday season.”

Please note there are limited quantities and it is first come, first served by cash, check or money order payable to Putnam County Historian’s Office.

For more information contact the Historian’s Office at 845-808-1420 or email historian@putnamcountyny.gov.

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Image Captions:

  • Framed color prints of the 1829 David H. Burr map of Dutchess and Putnam counties available for a limited time from the Putnam County Historian’s Office
  • Collaborative History of Putnam County, New York from 2012, now on sale through the Historian’s Office

Historic Treasures: The Pandemic’s Silver Lining

November 23, 2020, Brewster, N.Y. – Recently, the Putnam County Historian’s Office hosted a virtual Historians’ Roundtable where members of local historical societies and museums discussed the interesting and increasing trend of donating ephemera and artifacts during the past eight pandemic-riddled months, all while local and former Putnam County residents have been staying home to curb exposure to COVID-19.

“There has been a noted uptick of in-kind donations to the Historian’s Collection during the pandemic,” says Jennifer Cassidy of the Putnam County Historian’s Office. “We’ve received an 1897 copy of F.W. Beers’ Commemorative Biographical Record of Dutchess and Putnam Counties, high school yearbooks, and many photographs that range from historic homesteads and families, to class pictures from the 1970s, and even more recent digital images that cover Black Lives Matter protests taking place in front of the Historic Courthouse in Carmel.”

Many residents have been cleaning up and sorting through, and sometimes deciding to donate family photos, papers, militaria and other ephemera that could be of significance to local history, rather than relegating these treasures to the garbage heap.  The local historical organizations view this as an opportunity to assess and gather important items and documents for their collections, while utilizing best practices of safety through social distancing, wearing masks, and sometimes using contactless drop off and pick up.

Over at the Putnam History Museum in Cold Spring, John Duncan, PHM’s Collections Manager, recently received donations from Anthony and Taylor Mike Belcher, former longtime residents of Garrison, NY and descendants of Henry White Belcher, owner of the Garrison and West Point Ferry Company.  The Belchers, now living in Florida, shipped local history artifacts to the Museum.  “One exceptional item is a seal stamp for the West Point Ferry Company, which operated from approximately 1854 to 1900 along the shores of the Hudson River,” says Duncan.

The Belchers also sent a selection of photographs of Garrison Landing dating back to the 1920’s and 30’s which feature a variety of unique views of the landing and surrounding areas.  The importance of photographs like these is never lost on historical organizations – they not only help tell the story of local history, but also help interpret the past, and sometimes fill a void.

“These images fill a gap in our collection since most of the photos we have of the landing are from the late 19th century, or post-1960’s. This time period is an amazing addition and comes from a family with strong roots in the Garrison Landing community,” says Cassie Ward, Executive Director of the Putnam History Museum.

Donations vary from the formal to the decidedly off-beat. Back in September, Village Trustee, Mary Bryde, contacted the Southeast Museum, located in the Village of Brewster, about a set of cobblestones. “They were once part of Main Street before the street was paved with asphalt,” says Museum Director Amy Campanaro.  “We don’t even have pictures of the Village with cobblestone streets, but here’s physical proof! We cannot wait to construct an exhibit around these historic objects.”

The stones were donated by Bryde’s friend, Ruthann Platz, daughter of the late Mayor Richard Mitchell who was a trustee of the Village from 1963 to 1969 and mayor from 1969 to 1977.  But her roots don’t end there: she’s also the granddaughter of the Village’s first clerk and great-granddaughter of an immigrant miner who worked in the iron ore mines that were once located in the village during the 1870’s.

Aside from the museums in Cold Spring and Brewster, other towns throughout Putnam County have historical societies that collect significant items relating to their towns including Patterson, Carmel, Kent and Putnam Valley.

“Donations documenting local history have been a silver lining during the pandemic,” says Cassidy, “Putnam County’s local historical societies and museums depend on donations they receive from supporters near and far.  These non-profits need the community’s continued support through financial donations and membership too, so that they may care for these historic treasures in their collections.”

Cassidy noted that the most ideal setting for collections is in climate-controlled storage facilities like the County Archives, but they are expensive to build, maintain and upgrade.   “We are fortunate to house not only our archived records but also papers and photographs from the Historian’s Collection in our humidity and temperature-controlled archives room,” says Cassidy.  “We have a wonderful facility and partnership with the Records Department and County Clerk’s Office, all working together to protect Putnam County’s history for the future.”

For more information on Putnam County’s local history organizations and museums and how you can help, please contact the Putnam County Historian’s Office at 845-808-1420 or email historian@putnamcountyny.gov.

 

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Image Captions and Credits:

  1. John Duncan, Putnam History Museum’s Collections Manager studies acquisitions received during the pandemic. Image courtesy of Putnam History Museum
  2. The 19th Century seal stamp from the West Point Ferry Company, which was operated by Henry White Belcher of Garrison, NY. Image courtesy of Putnam History Museum
  3. Cobblestones donated to the Southeast Museum dating back to early days in the Village of Brewster. Image courtesy of Southeast Museum
  4. L to R: Jennifer Cassidy and Melinda Miller review Garden Street School class pictures dating back to the 1970’s, now in the Historian’s Collection at the County Archives. PCHO
  5. Class pictures donated to the Putnam County Historian’s Collection in memory of Dorothy Weizenecker, a former Garden Street Elementary School teacher. This school was built in 1927 but closed in 2012 due to dwindling enrollment and restoration needs. PCHO

 

Data informs decision-making: Putnam Pushes State for Zip-Code Breakdown

BREWSTER, NY— Thanksgiving has always been a time for family and friends to gather. Unfortunately, as Putnam County’s COVID-19 positivity rate and daily case count have been on the rise, local officials are encouraging residents to modify holiday plans and keep their families safe.  The county is also working with the state to get information to residents, businesses, and schools that might be impacted by the Governor’s micro-cluster designations.  

The New York State Department of Health uses a variety of metrics to determine when an area will be designated a micro-cluster. Two of these metrics are readily available for residents to view: the positivity rate based on a seven-day rolling average, and the number of cases per 100,000 people. These daily metrics are available online at https://forward.ny.gov/percentage-positive-results-county-dashboard. To learn more about the other metrics considered for a micro-cluster designation, New York State has released a more detailed explanation of the strategy here: https://www.governor.ny.gov/sites/governor.ny.gov/files/atoms/files/MicroCluster_Metrics_10.21.20_FINAL.pdf  

   “The majority of our residents continue to make responsible choices that keep their community safe. However, we do rely on the state data to keep people informed– which is why we continue to push for the state to provide us with a town or zip code breakdown of their metrics.  The governor’s mention of Brewster ‘nearing yellow zone designation’ confirms that our request to view Putnam County on a hyper-local level is a necessity,” says Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell. The village of Brewster and its growing case numbers were mentioned by the Governor in his press briefing on November 23.   

Health Commissioner Michael Nesheiwat, MD advises, “We continue to encourage all residents of our county to adhere to the recommendations that helped us flatten the curve earlier this year. Putnam County has seen a sharp rise in positive cases related to social gatherings and parties. The spike that is occurring locally is a result of our actions. Whether you are in closer proximity to Brewster, or you are further west, nearer to Peekskill, it is clear that our numbers are rising, and we all must make responsible choices to keep our families and our neighbors safe.”   

The mission of the Putnam County Department of Health, nationally accredited by the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB), is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services provided directly and through collaboration include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our County website at www.putnamcountyny.com; or find us on social media @PutnamHealthNY.

Putnam County Police Policy Review Panel on November 24, 2020 Presentation

Breakdown of positive cases by towns in Putnam County 11/20/2020

Region’s County Officials Unite to Implore Residents: ‘Don’t Get Casual About COVID’

County Leaders and Health Officials highlight dramatic increase in COVID-19 cases relating to casual, social gatherings

Urge vigilance and safety precautions during holiday season

 

Poughkeepsie, NY … A week prior to Thanksgiving and the start of the winter holiday season, leaders from Dutchess, Orange, Putnam and Ulster counties gathered virtually today to ask residents to remain vigilant in the coming weeks and curtail small social gatherings. Such parties or “hangouts,” even among friends and family members, have led to a recent increase in local COVID-19 cases, raising the Mid-Hudson region’s positivity rate, affecting the ability of schools and businesses to remain open and further stressing the region’s healthcare resources.

Many residents assume COVID-19 cases are on the rise due to exposures at workplaces, schools and businesses.  In recent weeks, however, the Mid-Hudson region has seen a surge in cases resulting from gatherings in casual settings such as homes, where many residents have become lax about adhering to proper safety guidelines – proper mask wearing, hand washing and social distancing – and one infected individual can expose many more. With the broad roll-out of a COVID-19 vaccine still months away, the region’s leaders implored residents to keep their gatherings small, preferably to immediate members of their household, and continue to follow COVID-19 safety guidelines whenever people are interacting with others beyond their immediate household.

Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro said, “With the holidays soon upon us, accompanied by the traditional get-togethers, we are at a critical moment in the COVID-19 pandemic. Each of us can keep our families, community and region safe.  Keeping our  gatherings small and putting get togethers on pause are sacrifices we can make to protect our health and the health of those we love. We need to dig deep, summon the compassion and do our part to stay healthy.”

As of Wednesday, Nov. 18th, the most recent data available from New York State, the Mid-Hudson’s regional positivity rate was 4.6 percent, with a seven-day average of 3.8 percent.

In recent weeks, counties throughout the region have seen confirmed positive cases grow exponentially, largely attributable to individuals who were infected at a casual gathering presenting in the community and exposing those around them.

Orange County Executive Steve Neuhaus said in the past week, two COVID-19 deaths in his county were residents in their 20s, proving the virus can affect every individual differently, regardless of age or underlying condition.

“Thanksgiving and other holidays are usually a wonderful opportunity to get together with our loved ones, but we must remain vigilant against the spread of the virus as we continue to see an uptick in cases. Out of an abundance of caution, please avoid large family gatherings this Thanksgiving, and celebrate with those within your immediate household. Our future success in getting safely through this pandemic depends greatly on the precautions that you take today.” Orange County Executive Steven M. Neuhaus

The effects of COVID-19 exposure from social gatherings ripple through a community, impacting those exposed, their contacts, local schools where exposed individuals attend and businesses at which they work.

As they have since the start of the pandemic, leaders today again asked residents to stay home if they feel they have broad symptoms – such as fever, cough, sore throat or congestion, among others – as it’s better to remain home for a day or two only to find they don’t have COVID-19 and not expose others, as opposed to needing to quarantine for 14 days as the result of a confirmed positive case.

Putnam County’s Deputy County Executive Tom Feighery noted that Putnam saw a direct correlation between people ‘letting down their guard’ (not following safety measures in casual, social settings) and COVID-19 transmission in the six days following Halloween when positive case doubled in that county.

“We appreciate all of the essential workers, especially all the Health Departments for their efforts and hope the public will do their part,“ said Deputy County Executive Feighery

COVID-19 cases stemming from casual gatherings have a ripple effect on counties’ contact-tracing efforts, by creating an increased workload for contact tracers, which slows down the entire tracing process for all infections. Leaders today asked residents who think they may have been exposed to COVID-19 to please reach out to possible contacts so they can get tested and begin the quarantine process.

Ulster County Executive Pat Ryan described a small Halloween party attended by just three families in late October. Four children who attended that small gathering were COVID-positive, unbeknownst to themselves or their families. Since then, 15 positive cases have been traced back to that casual get-together, impacting a local college, elementary school, middle school and high school, proving the wide impact of “living room spread.”

“We know that this is a make or break moment for us as a county and a community,” Ulster County Executive Pat Ryan said. “As we see our numbers increase to levels that we have not seen in months, we must remain proactive to blunt a much more significant second wave. We will be doing everything that we can to remind residents to continue to social distance, wear masks, and take all precautions necessary.”

County Executive Molinaro concluded, “We have been battling this pandemic for eight months, and we don’t want our best efforts to go to waste. COVID-19 remains a deadly disease, and we must not become complacent and casual in our efforts to fight it. Even when you gather among your immediate family, please wear a mask, wash your hands and remain at a safe distance. The pandemic doesn’t let up for the holidays – neither can we.”

 

If you worked at or visited Ministerio Internacional Campamento De Jehova Sunday, November 15 from 7:30am to 12pm You may have been exposed to COVID-19

Beyond these doors is a business that cares.
Ministerio Internacional Campamento De Jehova follows CDC
cleaning protocols and is helping to keep our community safe by
informing their customers that a visitor here may have exposed
others during the specified time.

HEALTH ALERT

If you worked at or visited Ministerio Internacional Campamento De Jehova, at
407 Route 6, Mahopac on
Sunday, November 15
from 7:30am to 12pm
You may have been exposed to COVID-19
A member of the public who has tested positive for COVID-19 was at the ministry during this time.
Watch for symptoms of COVID-19 until November 30 These may include fever, chills, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea. Contact your physician with any concerns.
Please visit our website for testing information www.putnamcountyny.com/health/coronavirus/
Keep posted until November 30
If you have any questions, please contact the Putnam County Department of Health at 845-808-1390.

 

El Ministerio Internacional Campamento De Jehova quiere a su
comunidad y está siguiendo una guía detallada para desinfección
recomendado por el CDC. Manteniendo a nuestra comunidad segura
incluye informando a sus clientes que un visitante aquí pudo ver
infectado a otros durante el tiempo especificado en el aviso.

AVISO DE SALUD

Si usted trabajó o visitó el
Ministerio Internacional Campamento De Jehova, en la
407 Ruta 6, Mahopac el
Domingo 15 de Noviembre al de 7:30am-12pm
Es posible que haya estado expuesto a COVID-19
Un miembro de la comunidad salió positivo para COVID-19 y estuvo en el Ministerio Internacional Campamento De Jehova durante este tiempo.
Watch for symptoms of COVID-19 until November 30 Por favor este pendiente y vigile para síntomas de COVID-19 que incluyen fiebre, escalofríos, dificultad para respirar, fatiga, dolores musculares o corporales, dolor de cabeza, nueva pérdida de sabor o olfato, dolor de garganta, congestión, nariz mocosa, náuseas, vómitos o diarrea. Llame a su médico si tiene preguntas o síntomas.
Visite nuestro sitio web para obtener información sobre las pruebas para COVID-19 www.putnamcountyny.com/health/coronavirus/
Este aviso permanecerá en efecto hasta el 30 de Noviembre, 2020.
Si usted tiene peguntas por favor llame al Departamento de Salud del Condado de Putnam al 845-808-1390

HEALTH ALERT – If you worked at or visited The Home Depot in Brewster on Saturday, November 7 You may have been exposed to COVID-19

Beyond these doors is a business that cares.
Home Depot follows CDC cleaning protocols and is helping to keep
our community safe by informing their customers that a visitor
here may have exposed others during the specified time.

HEALTH ALERT

If you worked at or visited The Home Depot, at
80 Independent Way, Brewster on
Saturday, November 7
from 10am to 11am
You may have been exposed to COVID-19

A member of the public who has tested positive for COVID-19 was at the facility during this time.
Watch for symptoms of COVID-19 until November 22 These may include fever, chills, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea. Contact your physician with any concerns.
Please visit our website for testing information www.putnamcountyny.com/health/coronavirus/
Keep posted until November 22
If you have any questions, please contact the Putnam County Department of Health at 845-808-1390.

HEALTH ALERT – If you worked at or visited Mahopac Golf & Beach Club in Mahopac on Thursday, November 12 to November 14 You may have been exposed to COVID-19

Beyond these doors is a business that cares.
Mahopac Golf & Beach Club follows CDC cleaning protocols and is
helping to keep our community safe by informing their customers
that a visitor here may have exposed others during the specified
time.

HEALTH ALERT

If you worked at or visited Mahopac Golf & Beach Club, at
601 North Lake Boulevard, Mahopac on
Thursday, November 12 from 10:30am to 4pm
Friday, November 13 from 10:30am to 4pm
Saturday, November 14 from 10:30am to 4pm
You may have been exposed to COVID-19
A member of the public who has tested positive for COVID-19 was at the facility during this time.
Watch for symptoms of COVID-19 until November 29 These may include fever, chills, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea. Contact your physician with any concerns.
Please visit our website for testing information www.putnamcountyny.com/health/coronavirus/
Keep posted until November 29
If you have any questions, please contact the Putnam County Department of Health at 845-808-1390.