Paralegal Job Opening

Putnam County seeks a Paralegal to perform various paralegal tasks in support of attorneys, including research, review & preparation of legal docs, process petitions, Court orders, & prep litigation cases. Interact with legal professionals, Department. staff & public.  Requires possession of Paralegal certification plus BS or Assoc. degree.  Amount of experience determined by level of education.  Submit resume to:

Putnam County Personnel Dept.

Attn: Jan Miller

110 Old Rt. 6, #3

Carmel, NY 10512

Not later than March 9, 2020.       

EEO/AA

New initiative, Parent As Driving Partners

Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell is pleased to announce a new initiative, Parent As Driving Partners, at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, February 25, 2020, in the lobby of the Putnam County Office Building, 40 Gleneida Avenue, Carmel, New York.

Parents As Driving Partners is a partnership of the Putnam County Clerk, Putnam County Probation STOP-DWI, Putnam County Sheriff, Putnam County Traffic Safety Board and the Putnam County Youth Bureau. This new initiative emphasizes the role of parents in promoting safe driving habits in teens. The Youth Bureau has developed a booklet that contains some basic guidelines to help parents in their role as driving partners and includes a Parent/Teen Driving Agreement. This agreement outlines the responsibilities of both parents and teens in promoting safe driving.

Crashes are still the leading cause of teen deaths and 6 out of 10 teen crashes involve driver distraction. One-third of deaths among 13 to 19 year-olds occur in motor vehicle crashes and 16 year olds have higher crash rate than drivers of any other age.

The Putnam County Department of Motor Vehicles will be distributing this booklet to parents of teens applying for their learning permit and asking that they sign the Parent/Teen Driving Agreement.
The booklet and agreement will also be available at the Putnam County Youth Bureau as part of a comprehensive program addressing safe driving which also includes the SIDNE (Simulated Impaired Driving Experience) required by all county high schools in order to qualify for a school parking space.

Please join us on February 25th and help make Putnam County a better place for youth and their families.

Governor’s proposed Medicaid funding changes

Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell wants to voice her concern about the impact our communities would feel if the governor’s proposed Medicaid funding changes are enacted.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced he wants the state’s 62 counties to contribute an additional $150 million to pay for Medicaid’s skyrocketing costs. The counties enroll Medicaid recipients, but because we don’t set the eligibility guidelines, we are not responsible for the increase.

“Here in Putnam we take care of our most vulnerable citizens, and will always make sure they get the services they need,” Odell said. “But if the state shifts the cost of that care to the counties, we will have to make other cuts that will devastate our budget and hurt our communities.”

Putnam is not the only county on the brink of hardship if the funding change is enacted. Odell is in contact with Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone, who sits on the governor’s Medicaid Redesign Team, and he has heard Putnam’s concerns from many others.

In 2012, to help counties and local governments adhere to the 2% property tax cap, Governor Cuomo and State Lawmakers enacted a zero growth Medicaid cap. The cap helped counties stabilize and, in several cases, reduce county property tax rate levies.

We are asking the governor and state legislature to keep the zero growth Medicaid cap.

“As we have always done, counties stand united behind lowering the cost of Medicaid and improving the quality of care for those in need,” said New York State Association of Counties President John F. Marren, the Ontario County Chair. “However, any state Medicaid proposal must protect local taxpayers and services by keeping the current cost control caps in place.”

State Sen. Pete Harckham who represents Putnam County as well as parts of Westchester and Dutchess counties, said the state should look for more reasonable approaches to closing the budget gap before turning to already overburdened taxpayers.

“With the share of Medicaid costs in New York State making up about half of every county’s tax bill, no one should expect our hard-working property owners to foot an even larger share in order to close the state’s budget deficit,” said Harckham, a member of the Senate’s Local Government Committee. “Not when New York’s local government already pay the highest share of Medicaid costs in the country.”

 

New York is one of the few states in the nation to require county funds to cover the cost of Medicaid, and the only one that required county taxpayers to fund a full half of the State’s share when it was implemented in 1966. Today, counties and New York City fund $7.6 billion of the state’s more than $70 billion Medicaid program.

It’s undeniable that Medicaid costs have increased. In Putnam alone, the costs have risen by $4 million from 2018 to 2019.

Before 2015 in Putnam County, about 5,000 residents were enrolled in Medicaid. By July, 2019 the county had 13,114 Medicaid recipients.

None of these cost or enrollment increases are the result of Putnam County policy.

The governor has suggested the counties can find the extra funds by being ferreting out waste.

Putnam County has already done that.

A few years back, the county brought in consultants who worked with the Department of Social Services to flag suspected fraud. Upon inspection, some well-to-do residents did, in fact, seem to be abusing the system. By taking reverse mortgages on expensive homes, writing off investments as losses and hiding assets in untouchable retirement accounts, they qualified for Medicaid. But here’s the surprising thing: That’s all legal.  If the state closed its gaping loopholes, it could save some money.

During Odell’s tenure, the county has adopted eight budgets that were each under the state property tax cap. Putnam officials are not spendthrifts. We look after our taxpayers’ interests by spending conservatively.

To stay below the state’s 2 percent property tax cap, Putnam can only raise its spending by $1.2 million in this fiscal year.  But if the state shifts its Medicaid costs onto our backs, it will eat up a significant portion of our spending.

The bottom line is, if this shift in Medicaid costs goes through, Putnam’s outside agencies will see funding cuts and our aging infrastructure will continue to crumble.

We ask the Governor and the state Legislature to keep the zero Medicaid growth cap and work with the counties to find a way to solve the problem.

Putnam County Goes Red to Honor Judge Reitz and Support Heart Health for All

BREWSTER, NY—Despite the rainy, cold weather, dozens of Putnam County employees from commissioners to clerks, came out on Go Red Day to honor Honorable Judge James F. Reitz who passed away suddenly from a fatal heart attack last June. His widow Barbara joined the group in support of Go Red Day, the first Friday of every February, which is designated as American Heart Month. Every year, from coast to coast, Americans unite for a common goal—the eradication of heart disease and stroke. The slogan, Go Red for Women, calls attention to the fact that more women die every year of heart diseases than all cancers combined.

The overarching message is to encourage everyone, men and women, to spread the word and get your numbers checked. A basic annual physical and bloodwork should check your heart rate, blood pressure and cholesterol.

In April, residents will have the opportunity to join the 2020 Putnam Heart Walk, which will also honor Judge Reitz. Walkers can recognize him further by joining the community team called “‘Honoring Our Heart,’ Remembering Judge James F. Reitz.” The event takes place on Sunday, April 26, 2020 at 9 a.m. at Brewster High School. Walking is a heart-healthy exercise and participants can join this community team or create their own. Either way they will be joining with the American Heart Association to create a world of longer, healthier lives free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke by participating, fundraising, volunteering or sponsoring the Heart Walk. To learn more, visit www.PutnamHeartWalk.org and register!

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

March 1st ban single-use plastic bags

It’s time for Putnam County residents to remember to bring their own reusable bags with them when they go shopping, Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell said.

“Starting March 1, a New York State law will ban single-use plastic bags,” said Putnam County Legislature Chairwoman Toni Addonizio. “Retailers in Putnam, and throughout the state, will no longer be able to provide plastic bags to customers for carrying their goods.”

Jane Meunier, solid waste management program coordinator for the Putnam County Department of Health, praised the new law.

“It is our goal for Putnam County to not only embrace recycling initiatives such as this but to make our County an example of how to improve and be at the forefront in the recycling and solid waste management field,” Meunier said. “We all need to do our part.  The inconvenience of bringing your own reusable bags for shopping cannot compare to the devastation that single-use plastic bags cause to our environment – and specifically our beautiful Putnam County!”

Reusable shopping bags are sturdy, washable and hold more, if you can remember to bring them, Amy Sayegh, chairwoman of the Legislature’s Health Committee said.

“This is an important law for the state, the county and, of course, the planet,” Sayegh said.

There are some exemptions from the state ban, including dry cleaning bags, newspaper delivery bags and bags used by customers to package fruits, vegetables or other loose items.  But now is a good time to think ahead to reduce other plastic waste, said Victoria DiLonardo, Recycling Educator for the Putnam County Department of Health.

“After it becomes a habit to bring your shopping bags with you to the store, try switching to reusable produce bags,” DiLonardo said. “And once that becomes a habit, try bringing your own travel mug to the coffee shop, and so on. If we can all make small steps towards creating less plastic waste, it will make a big difference.”

 

,” said Putnam County Legislature Chairwoman Toni Addonizio. “Retailers in Putnam, and throughout the state, will no longer be able to provide plastic bags to customers for carrying their goods.”

Jane Meunier, solid waste management program coordinator for the Putnam County Department of Health, praised the new law.

“It is our goal for Putnam County to not only embrace recycling initiatives such as this but to make our County an example of how to improve and be at the forefront in the recycling and solid waste management field,” Meunier said. “We all need to do our part.  The inconvenience of bringing your own reusable bags for shopping cannot compare to the devastation that single-use plastic bags cause to our environment – and specifically our beautiful Putnam County!”

Reusable shopping bags are sturdy, washable and hold more, if you can remember to bring them, Amy Sayegh, chairwoman of the Legislature’s Health Committee said.

“This is an important law for the state, the county and, of course, the planet,” Sayegh said.

There are some exemptions from the state ban, including dry cleaning bags, newspaper delivery bags and bags used by customers to package fruits, vegetables or other loose items.  But now is a good time to think ahead to reduce other plastic waste, said Victoria DiLonardo, Recycling Educator for the Putnam County Department of Health.

“After it becomes a habit to bring your shopping bags with you to the store, try switching to reusable produce bags,” DiLonardo said. “And once that becomes a habit, try bringing your own travel mug to the coffee shop, and so on. If we can all make small steps towards creating less plastic waste, it will make a big difference.”

2019 Novel Coronavirus Information

What is a coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are known to cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS).

What is a novel coronavirus?

A novel coronavirus (CoV) is a new strain of coronavirus that has not been previously identified in humans. The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is a virus (more specifically, a coronavirus) identified as the cause of an outbreak of respiratory illness first detected in Wuhan, China in December of 2019.

What is the most recent information about 2019-nCoV?

2019-nCoV has since been identified outside of China, in a growing number of countries, including the United States. The first US case was identified on January 21, 2020 and the second case was announced on January 24, 2020. Both cases reported travel to the Wuhan Province in China and neither reside in NYS. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is closely monitoring the outbreak caused by the novel coronavirus first identified in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. For the latest information about 2019-nCoV, visit the CDC 2019 Novel Coronavirus, Wuhan, China webpage.

How are coronaviruses spread?

Coronaviruses are zoonotic, meaning they are transmitted between animals and people. Since the 2019-nCoV is newly identified, it is being carefully studied by health officials to determine how it is spreading. Some coronaviruses have previously been transmitted person-to-person after close contact with an infected individual. There is more to learn about the 2019-nCoV. Health authorities are continuing to watch how the virus spreads, and the PCDOH will update this site as new information becomes available.

What are the symptoms?

Patients with confirmed 2019-nCoV infection have reportedly had mild to severe respiratory illness similar to pneumonia, with symptoms of:

  • fever
  • cough
  • shortness of breath

What can travelers do to protect themselves?

  • The CDC recommends that travelers avoid all nonessential travel to Wuhan, China. Chinese officials have closed transport within and out of Wuhan, including buses, subways, trains, and the international airport. If you must travel:
  • Avoid contact with sick people.
  • Avoid animals (alive or dead), animal markets, and products that come from animals (such as uncooked meat).
  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Older adults and travelers with underlying health issues may be at risk for more severe disease and should discuss travel to Wuhan with their healthcare provider.

What should I do if I (or someone I know) traveled to Wuhan, China?  

If you recently traveled to Wuhan or have been in close contact with someone who has confirmed novel coronavirus 2019 and you feel sick with fever, cough, or difficulty breathing, you should:

  • Seek medical care right away. Before you go to the doctor’s office or emergency room, you must call ahead and tell them about your recent travel and your symptoms.
  • Avoid contact with others.
  • Do not travel while sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.

Is there treatment for 2019-nCoV?

There is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for 2019-nCoV infection. People infected with 2019-nCoV should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms. For severe cases, treatment should include care to support vital organ functions.

What can I do to protect myself?

There is currently no vaccine to prevent 2019-nCoV infection. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to this virus. We recommend everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses, including:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick. Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

 

Resources:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/index.html

https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/communicable/coronavirus/ 

https://www.putnamcountyny.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/NYSDOH-Advisory.-Update-and-Interim-Guidance-on-Outbreak-of-2019-Novel-Coronavirus.pdf

Putnam County Welcomes Newest Citizens at the Naturalization Ceremony January 22nd 2020 at the Historic Courthouse

PUTNAM COUNTY WELCOMES
NEWEST CITIZENS

PUTNAM COUNTY CLERK MICHAEL C. BARTOLOTTI SWEARS IN 43 NEW CITIZENS AT NATURALIZATION CEREMONY ON WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2020 AT PUTNAM COUNTY HISTORIC COURTHOUSE

Putnam County Clerk Michael C. Bartolotti hosted a Naturalization Ceremony on Wednesday, January 22, 2020 at 11 a.m. at the Putnam County Historic Courthouse, Carmel, New York. Clerk Bartolotti administered the Oath of Allegiance to 43 new citizens from 24 different countries.
The Honorable Victor Grossman of the 9th Judicial District served as the officiating Supreme Court Justice and offered court remarks. Honorable Robert L. Langley Jr., Putnam County Sheriff, offered welcoming remarks. Putnam County District Attorney, led the opening prayer. Karl Rohde, Director of the Putnam County Veterans Affairs, led the Pledge of Allegiance. Ms. Carolyn Robinson from the Transplant Support Team, was the guest speaker. Isabella Ciatto, a senior at Carmel High School, presented the gathering with beautiful renditions of the “Star Spangled Banner” and God Bless America.”
After the ceremony, a coffee and cake reception was held to welcome our newest citizens.

 

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Twenty-Four (24) Nations

NATION NUMBER OF CASES

ALBANIA 1
ARGENTINA 1
AUSTRALIA 1
BANGLADESH 1
BRAZIL 3
CANADA 2
COLOMBIA 1
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 3
ECUADOR 4
FIJI 2
GUATEMALA 3
GUYANA 1
HAITI 1
JAMAICA 2
JORDAN 1
KOSOVO 3
MEXICO 3
PHILIPPINES 2
POLAND 2
RUSSIA 1
SOUTH KOREA 1
SPAIN 1
UKRAINE 2
UNITED KINGDOM 1

TOTAL PERSONS NATURALIZED 43

For further information, call:
Office of the Putnam County Clerk at 845-808-1142 Ext. 49301

National Hat Day at the Putnam Valley Senior Center

Wednesday, January 15th, was National Hat Day!  The attendees at the Putnam Valley Senior Center thought why not celebrate the day with fun hats!  Here are a few pictures of our Seniors enjoying our silly day!!  It really brightened up the day!  Everyone wore their smiles along with their hats making a dull winter day so much more fun!!

 

Census 2020 – Everyone Counts in Putnam

April 1, 2020 is Census Day. The Census is mandated by the U.S. Constitution. The United States has been conducting the Census every ten years since 1790. Data from the Census will be used for the next ten years for many things – including determining New York State’s representation in Congress as well as local districting. Your responses determine where over $675 billion is distributed each year to communities nationwide for clinics, schools, roads, and more. Census data gives community leaders vital information to make decisions about building community centers, opening businesses, and planning for the future. Responding also fulfills your civic duty because it’s mandated by the U.S. Constitution. The United States has counted its population every 10 years since 1790. Your responses are used to redraw legislative districts and determine the number of seats your state has in the U.S. House of Representatives. The Census Bureau estimates that every person not counted equals a loss of approximately $2,500 per year to local municipalities. This means that every 400 people who are not counted equates to a loss of about $1 Million in funding – each year to our community.

We need to get everyone living in Putnam counted.

What does the Census ask
The 2020 Census contains simple questions about the number of people in your household and their basic demographic data, along with whether the home is owned or rented. The Census Bureau will never ask you for your Social Security number, money or donations, anything on behalf of a political party, your bank or credit card account numbers, or about citizenship. See what questions are asked (https://2020census.gov/en/census-data.html) and why your answers matter.

Confidentiality
The Census Bureau is bound by Title 13 of the United States Code. These laws not only provide authority for the Census Bureau’s work, but also provide strong protection for the information they collect. All responses to the Census are confidential, and cannot be shared with any other federal or local government entity, including law enforcement agencies. More information (https://2020census.gov/en/data-protection.html) on data protection and confidentiality is available.

How to complete the Census form
Completing the Census is simple. There are only nine questions to answer, sample forms are available in English (https://2020census.gov/content/dam/2020census/materials/partners/2019-08/2020-informational-questionnaire.pdf)  and Spanish (https://2020census.gov/content/dam/2020census/materials/partners/2019-08/2020-informational-questionnaire-spanish.pdf) on the U.S Census Bureau’s website. Every household will receive an invitation to respond to the Census in March. This is the first time you will have the opportunity to respond quickly and easily online at www.2020census.gov. The Census Bureau will also accept response via phone or mail. Additional support to complete the Census will be provided in 59 languages including Polish.

How to Complete the Census Online

Want to know how to fill out the 2020 Census online? This is the first decennial census with an option to respond via the Internet. The Census Bureau has posted a preview of the 2020 Census Video Language Guide (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXZAe8XYeNQ) on YouTube that serves as a step-by-step tutorial for how to navigate the online interface of the 2020 Census. Study up on how to complete your Census questionnaire online before you receive your invitation to respond in March!

Census Jobs
The Census Bureau is hiring in Putnam. Apply, and with one application, you may be considered for several positions, including census taker, recruiting assistant, office clerk, and supervisory staff—and help your community while getting paid. Census takers are paid at a rate of $21.00 per hour, and receive reimbursement for work-related mileage and expenses, where applicable. Multilingual individuals are in high demand in Putnam County. Online applications are available in English and Spanish. See https://www.census.gov/library/video/2019/2020-census-jobs-be-a-census-taker.html.

Schools as Partners
The Census Bureau has developed comprehensive resources for educators of all ages. The 2020 Census matters for our children’s schools and the children themselves. The 2020 Census count will play a vital role in how federal funds are distributed to communities each year for critical programs and services. The new Statistics in Schools (SIS) classroom activities and materials for the 2019-2020 school year spotlight the 2020 Census and the importance of making sure everyone is counted, especially children.  A variety of age-oriented activities and fun facts are available for educators to use in the classroom at https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/sis/resources/games/coloring.html .

Community Outreach Toolkit

The U.S. Census Bureau has produced a Community Outreach Toolkit (https://www.census.gov/partners/toolkit.pdf) which outlines how to make communication and outreach efforts as effective as possible. This quick guide is great reading for anyone looking to make a difference in their community to increase participation in the 2020 Census.

The Census on YouTube

Prefer to watch a video? The Census Bureau’s YouTube channel features videos on the basics from “Census Made Simple” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXZAe8XYeNQ) to shorter Public Service Announcements on “Getting an Accurate Count” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXZAe8XYeNQ and “Completing the 2020 Census Online with Language Guide” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXZAe8XYeNQ) . Visit the Census Bureau’s YouTube channel  at https://www.youtube.com/user/uscensusbureau to access these and more educational resources in video format.

Who to contact
For more information on Putnam County’s Census 2020 efforts, contact Barbara Barosa, AICP, Senior Planner at 845-878-3480 or Barbara.barosa@putnamcountyny.gov.

Putnam County Clerk Michael C. Bartolotti to swear in New Citizens at Naturalization Ceremony on Wednesday January 22 2020

Putnam County Clerk Michael C. Bartolotti to swear in New Citizens at Naturalization Ceremony on Wednesday January 22 2020 at 11:00 a.m. at the Putnam County Historic Courthouse in Carmel NY

Putnam County Clerk Michael C. Bartolotti will host a Naturalization Ceremony on Wednesday, January 22, 2020, at 11:00 a.m. at the Putnam County Historic Courthouse, 44 Gleneida Avenue, Carmel. At the ceremony, Clerk Bartolotti will administer the Oath of Allegiance to our new citizens.