Putnam County Department of Health Schedules Pfizer Bivalent COVID-19 Booster vaccine clinic

The Putnam County Department of Health has scheduled a Pfizer Bivalent COVID-19 Booster vaccine clinic:

  • Monday, October 3 from 3 pm to 6 pm at the Putnam County Department of Health, located at 1 Geneva Road in Brewster

Pfizer Bivalent vaccine will be available for those 12 and older who received their most recent COVID vaccine at least 2 months prior.

Registration is required and can be completed at https://apps2.health.ny.gov/doh2/applinks/cdmspr/2/counties?OpID=E9493B7E97760338E0530A6C7C163FC1

Please make sure to bring your vaccination card to be updated. This is NOT a drive thru clinic.

Long COVID

What is Long COVID?

Long COVID may also be called post-COVID conditions, long-haul COVID, and post-acute COVID. Long COVID refers to a wide range of new, returning, or ongoing symptoms four or more weeks after first being infected with COVID-19. Long COVID can occur even if you did not have symptoms with initial infection.

Who can get Long COVID?

Any child or adult who was previously infected with COVID-19 can experience long-term effects from COVID-19, although it appears to be less common in children and adolescents. Research continues to better understand how many people infected with COVID-19 will go on to have Long COVID.

Why should I care about Long COVID?

Doctors and public health officials are still learning about the long-term effects of COVID-19. Long COVID has been shown to have a significant impact on people’s health and quality of life months after initial infection.

What are some of the effects of Long COVID?

The most commonly reported persistent symptoms include:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Tiredness or fatigue
  • Symptoms that get worse after physical or mental activities (also known as post-exertional malaise)
  • Difficulty thinking or concentrating (sometimes referred to as “brain fog”)
  • Cough
  • Chest or stomach pain
  • Headache
  • Fast-beating or pounding heart (also known as heart palpitations)
  • Joint or muscle pain
  • Pins-and-needles feeling
  • Diarrhea
  • Sleep problems
  • Fever
  • Dizziness on standing (lightheadedness)
  • Rash
  • Mood changes
  • Change in smell or taste
  • Changes in menstrual period cycles

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

How can I get help if I am struggling with Long COVID?

Long COVID can be considered a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Learn more at http://ow.ly/97eG50FLf8M.

NY Project Hope offers support for those who have COVID or are experiencing Long COVID, including online support groups. Learn more at https://nyprojecthope.org

WMC Health Post-COVID Recovery Program offers patients a tailored Post-COVID-19 treatment plan led by expert providers. Learn more at: www.westchestermedicalcenter.org/wmchealthpostcovid19recoveryprogram

How can I prevent Long COVID?

The best way to prevent Long COVID is to get the COVID-19 vaccine. To find vaccine providers near you, please visit vaccines.gov

Last reviewed: August 2, 2022

COVID Variants

What are COVID variants and how do they occur?

COVID variants are versions of the COVID virus that can be distinguished by differences (or variations) in their genetic code.

The formation of COVID variants was not unexpected. Changes in a virus’s genetic code (mutations) happen continuously as a virus replicates. The more a virus spreads, the more chances it has to replicate and mutate. So, genetic variations occur over time, and if certain variations make a virus better able to infect more people (like Delta or Omicron), it will come to predominate (be more common).

More information about variants can be found at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/variants/variant.html

How are COVID variants distinguished from one another?

COVID variants are distinguished from one another by a laboratory process called genomic sequencing. Genomic sequencing involves making a map of the entire genetic code of the virus. The process takes several days and is only done in specialized labs with this capability.

Do standard COVID tests tell us what variant a person is infected with?

No, standard COVID tests tell us if the COVID-19 virus is detected in the sample, but they do not distinguish between variants of the virus–that requires genomic sequencing.

Is genomic sequencing done for every positive COVID test?

No, genomic sequencing is only done on some positive samples for the purpose of genomic surveillance.

What is genomic surveillance and why is it important?

The goal of genomic surveillance is to continuously sequence enough positive samples across all areas of the state and the country to allow us to see what variants are circulating in what proportions where. Genomic surveillance allows scientists to monitor how the virus changes into new variants over time, study how mutations may affect the characteristics of the virus, and use this information to better understand how it might impact health.

More information about how variants are tracked in New York State can be found at: https://coronavirus.health.ny.gov/covid-19-variant-data

How can I find out what variants are circulating in my area?

The New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) provides a summary of variants currently circulating in NY, as well as charts displaying proportions of variants over time for NY and CDC Region 2 (includes NY) at: http://coronavirus.health.ny.gov/covid-19-variant-data

Why are variants a concern?

Not all variants are a concern, but some mutations might make a new variant more contagious, result in more severe illness, or reduce the effectiveness of vaccines and treatments. Scientists analyze the mutations observed in a new variant to determine if they are of concern.

Do vaccines work against variants?

National data are showing that COVID-19 vaccines authorized in the USA are highly effective in preventing severe disease and death, even against variants. However, we are seeing increases in the risk of becoming infected for vaccinated people.

How has the spread of variants changed public health recommendations?

Given what we have learned about variants, and trends in virus transmission, public health professionals are recommending layered protection strategies to reduce transmission of this variant. Layered prevention strategies include continuing to increase primary series and booster vaccination rates, but also continued attention to tried and true prevention strategies like masking, social distancing, and handwashing.

So, does that mean if I am vaccinated, should I still wear my mask?

There are definite benefits for vaccinated individuals to wear a mask in certain situations. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has made the following updates to its guidance for those vaccinated individuals: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/about-face-coverings.html. This information is subject to change.

Last reviewed: August 2, 2022

Putnam County Vaccine Clinics And Testing Sites Will Reduce Operations

Immediate Release

 

Putnam County Executive

MaryEllen Odell 845-808-1001

January 28, 2022

 

With the number of Omicron cases dropping and demand for COVID vaccines and tests decreasing, Putnam County’s vaccine clinics and testing sites will reduce operations, though both can be restarted on short notice, if necessary, Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell announced.

The Covid test site in Carmel will be open on Mondays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.  In Philipstown, the testing site will be open Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Both sites will be closed Saturday, Jan. 29, 2022 for the storm.

The Department of Health has scheduled its last vaccine clinic for Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2022.

County Executive Odell thanked the Department of Health and Ambulnz, the county’s partner in the drive-through COVID test sites, for helping to keep Putnam residents safe.

“Our Department of Health has worked incredibly hard throughout this entire pandemic to educate and vaccinate our residents. During the recent surge, they ran vaccination clinics every week for everyone eligible,” County Executive Odell said.  “They are a small department, but they never gave up and we owe each member of the staff a debt of gratitude for helping protect our communities.”

In addition to vaccine clinics in Philipstown and Carmel, the Putnam County Department of Health has regularly held clinics in places where immigrants and other hard to reach populations could access them. The department also vaccinated the homebound in partnership with the Department of Social Services.

The Department of Health set up its first COVID vaccine clinic in January 2021 and has administered 25,392 vaccines since then.  In the vaccine clinic scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 1, only 53 people have signed up.

“Because the cases and positivity rate are dropping, people are now, unfortunately, not worrying about getting vaccinated,” Dr. Michael J. Nesheiwat, the Putnam County Commissioner of Health said. “By the time we finish our next two clinics, the demand will be able to be managed by the pharmacies and community providers.”

Ambulnz, the county’s new partner, set up COVID tests sites in Carmel and Philipstown during the height of the Omicron surge, enabling residents on both sides of Putnam County to easily get tested when they needed it most.

“Pharmacies across the county were out of rapid test kits, community medical providers were completely overwhelmed by the demand for tests and the federal and state governments were dragging their feet in offering help to a small county like ours,” Odell said. “Then Ambulnz stepped in and within days they were running a highly-efficient, professional testing operation. Without our partnership with Ambulnz, our residents would have had to travel a great distance to get tested, and who knows how many more COVID cases could have resulted from that impediment to easy testing?”

At the height of the Omicron surge, Ambulnz administered 600 to 700 COVID tests per day.  From Jan. 23 to Jan. 25, only 154 tests were given.

Should the need arise, Ambulnz is prepared to increase the number of testing days per week and can hold COVID vaccine clinics. “We are proud to be serving the residents of Putnam County and look forward to our continued partnership to bring healthcare services to those in need.” Michael Witkowski, Chief of EMS Operations for Ambulnz.

For more information on COVID vaccine clinics and COVID testing sites, see putnamcountyny.com

 

Health Department Continues COVID-19 Vaccinations; Registration Open for Tuesdays, Jan 25 and Feb 1

The Putnam County Department of Health continues to vaccinate children and provide important and appropriate boosters. Online registration is currently open for the next two clinics, January 25 and February 1, at: www.putnamcountyny.com/health/covid19/#vaxinfo By appointment only, no walk-ins.

  • First and second dose Pfizer will be available for the 5 to 11-age group.
  • Moderna boosters will be available for individuals 18 years and older.
  • Pfizer boosters will be available for individuals 12 and older.

Both clinics are from 1 to 3:30 pm. The January 25 clinic will be held at the Claudio Marzollo Community Center in Philipstown. The second clinic on February 1 will be in Carmel at Putnam Plaza, in the former Dressbarn location.

January 25 is the last scheduled clinic in Philipstown at this time. A final clinic will be scheduled February 8, in Carmel. Check the health department website or follow the PCDOH on social media @PutnamHealthNY. To find other nearby locations, visit vaccines.gov. COVID vaccines can also be scheduled at health department immunization clinics. For further information, call the health department at 845-808-1390. Currently, there is vaccine availability in Putnam at pharmacies as well as healthcare providers.

Free At-Home COVID-19 Test Kits Available Through Mail

Each home in the United States is eligible to receive 4 free at-home COVID-19 test kits through the United States Postal Service.

Find out more information, and order your test kits at covidtests.gov

Test kits start shipping at the end of January.

Children Twelve to 15 Years Old Now Eligible for Pfizer Boosters; COVID Registration Open for Tuesday, Jan 11 and Tuesday, January 18

 

The Putnam County Department of Health will be administering boosters to all newly eligible residents, beginning with their next clinic on January 11. This comes with the announcements by Centers for Disease Control and the New York State Department of Health that boosters for this group are safe and offer improved protection. Online registration is currently open for the next two clinics, January 11 and January 18, at: www.putnamcountyny.com/health/covid19/#vaxinfo By appointment only, no walk-ins.

  • First and second dose Pfizer will be available for the 5 to 11-age group.
  • Moderna boosters will be available for individuals 18 years and older.
  • Pfizer boosters will be available for individuals 12 and older.

Both clinics are from 1 to 3:30 pm in Carmel at Putnam Plaza, in the former Dressbarn location.

COVID vaccines are also given at health department regularly scheduled immunization clinics. For further information, call the health department at 845-808-1390.

Future COVID vaccine clinics are planned for January 25 in Philipstown, and February 1 and 8 in Putnam Plaza. Stay tuned and watch for when online registration officially opens—usually after the previous clinics are completed. Check the health department website or follow the PCDOH on social media @PutnamHealthNY.

Putnam County will be distributing thousands of rapid COVID tests

Putnam County will be distributing thousands of rapid Covid tests to CAP, food pantries, shelters, libraries, senior citizen centers and houses of worship over the coming days in an effort to stem the spread of the Omicron variant and keep schools and businesses open, Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell announced.

“Putnam County entered into a public/private partnership with Ambulnz to set up testing centers in Carmel and Philipstown where our residents can get the services they need,” County Executive Odell said. “Not all of our residents can easily reach those testing sites, however, so we are distributing these home tests to help them get fast, accurate test results in order to protect themselves, their loved ones and our communities.”

The county received 4,437 rapid antigen test kits from the state in its first shipment. More are expected.

The drive-in test sites are open from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. on weekdays for school children and school district staff and from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. seven days a week for all other Putnam County residents. The Paladin Center and Philipstown Rec sites opened on December 27 and tested more than 4,500 people and found that 810, or 17%, were positive for Covid.

The New York State Department of Health guidelines for isolating and quarantining have been shortened to five days. For the latest information, see https://coronavirus.health.ny.gov/quarantines-contacts

The Putnam County Department of Health offers clinics for vaccines and booster shots every Tuesday. An appointment is required. See the PCDOH website for more information:  https://www.putnamcountyny.com/health/

Results from the rapid antigen test kits the county is distributing may not be accepted by airlines, some work settings or by medical facilities requiring Covid clearance before medical procedures.  People who need testing for those reasons should secure a PCR test from their doctor’s office or elsewhere.

 

Online COVID Registration Open for Tuesday, Dec 28 and Tuesday, January 4

The Putnam County Department of Health has two upcoming COVID clinics open for online registration at: www.putnamcountyny.com/health/covid19/#vaxinfo

Children five to eleven years of age are eligible for either a first or second dose of the Pfizer vaccine. Adults are eligible to receive first doses, second doses and boosters of both the Modern and Pfizer vaccines. The first clinic is Tuesday, December 28, in Carmel Plaza at the former Dressbarn location, from 1 to 3:30pm. A second clinic will be held on Tuesday, January 4, in Philipstown at the Claudio Marzollo Community Center, located on Route 9D in Garrison. Both clinics run from 1 to 3:30pm.

Second doses and boosters will be given provided that the proper amount of time has passed. Second doses follow three to four weeks after the initial dose, depending which initial vaccine was received. Boosters for adults can be given if six months has passed since the second dose was received, or two months after a single-dose vaccine, such as the Johnson & Johnson. Individuals who received the “J&J” shot initially, may receive either Moderna or Pfizer boosters, since the Johnson and Johnson vaccine will not be available at these clinics.

To be eligible for a Moderna booster, an individual must be 18 years and older. Pfizer boosters can be given to those 16 years of age and older. If an individual 16 or 17 years old received two doses of Pfizer more than six months ago, a Pfizer booster is the only option. Those 18 years of age and older can switch vaccines manufacturers if desired.

COVID vaccines are also given at health department regularly scheduled immunization clinics. For further information or to schedule an appointment, call the health department at 845-808-1390.

More COVID vaccine clinics are planned for January. Stay tuned and check the health department website or follow the PCDOH on social media @PutnamHealthNY.

Online COVID Registration Open for Tuesday, Dec 28 and Tuesday, January 4

The Putnam County Department of Health has two upcoming COVID clinics open for online registration at: www.putnamcountyny.com/health/covid19/#vaxinfo

Children five to eleven years of age are eligible for either a first or second dose of the Pfizer vaccine. Adults are eligible to receive first doses, second doses and boosters of both the Modern and Pfizer vaccines. The first clinic is Tuesday, December 28, in Carmel Plaza at the former Dressbarn location, from 1 to 3:30pm. A second clinic will be held on Tuesday, January 4, in Philipstown at the Claudio Marzollo Community Center, located on Route 9D in Garrison. Both clinics run from 1 to 3:30pm.

Second doses and boosters will be given provided that the proper amount of time has passed. Second doses follow three to four weeks after the initial dose, depending which initial vaccine was received. Boosters for adults can be given if six months has passed since the second dose was received, or two months after a single-dose vaccine, such as the Johnson & Johnson. Individuals who received the “J&J” shot initially, may receive either Moderna or Pfizer boosters, since the Johnson and Johnson vaccine will not be available at these clinics.

To be eligible for a Moderna booster, an individual must be 18 years and older. Pfizer boosters can be given to those 16 years of age and older. If an individual 16 or 17 years old received two doses of Pfizer more than six months ago, a Pfizer booster is the only option. Those 18 years of age and older can switch vaccines manufacturers if desired.

COVID vaccines are also given at health department regularly scheduled immunization clinics. For further information or to schedule an appointment, call the health department at 845-808-1390.

More COVID vaccine clinics are planned for January. Stay tuned and check the health department website or follow the PCDOH on social media @PutnamHealthNY.