If you worked at or visited Salsa Fresca in Carmel NY on You may have been exposed to COVID- 19

HEALTH ALERT

If you worked at or visited Salsa Fresca in Carmel, NY on July 7 from 7pm-8pm

You may have been exposed to COVID-19.

A member of the public who has tested positive for COVID-19 visited the restaurant during this time.

Please watch for symptoms of COVID-19 which include fever, chills, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea.

Contact your physician with any concerns.

Please visit our website for testing information www.putnamcountyny.com/health/coronavirus/

If you have any questions, please contact the Putnam County Department of Health at 845-808-1390.

HEALTH ALERT | If you worked at or visited Tom & Jerry’s Bar & Grill in Brewster, NY on July 6 from 1:30pm-3pm  You may have been exposed to COVID-19.

If you worked at or visited Tom & Jerry’s Bar & Grill

in Brewster, NY on July 6 from 1:30pm-3pm

 You may have been exposed to COVID-19.

A member of the public who has tested positive for COVID-19 visited the Bar & Grill during this time.

Please watch for symptoms of COVID-19 which include fever, chills, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea.

Contact your physician with any concerns.

Please visit our website for testing information www.putnamcountyny.com/health/coronavirus/

If you have any questions, please contact the Putnam County Department of Health at 845-808-1390.

 

Phase 4 reopening | UPDATED TO REFLECT THAT MALLS WILL OPEN FRIDAY IN REGIONS THAT HAVE REACHED PHASE 4

Museums, exhibitions, historical sites and low-risk entertainment venues are now allowed to reopen in Putnam County as the Mid-Hudson region enters Phase 4 of the state’s reopening plan.

Social gatherings of up to 50 people will also be allowed as will low-risk youth sports including baseball, softball, gymnastics, field hockey, cross country and track, with no more than two spectators.

“We are thrilled to have social gatherings, kids’ sports and our Main Street businesses almost fully back again,” Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell said. “Under the guidance of our Department of Health, we have proceeded with caution throughout this pandemic and our vigilance has paid off. We can now shop Putnam and patronize the businesses that belong to our friends and neighbors, while also maintaining the health and safety of our communities.”

Malls in the Mid-Hudson region, and other areas of the state that have reached Phase 4, will reopen Friday July 10. Malls must have air filtration systems that can remove coronavirus particles from the air. Shoppers will also have to follow social distancing rules and stores will be restricted to 50 percent occupancy.

“We are happy to see that the malls will reopen,” County Executive Odell said. “With nearby states allowing mall shopping, this will level the playing field for New York State.”

Gov. Andrew Cuomo did not permit gyms, indoor fitness centers and movie theaters to reopen as part of Phase 4, instead they must remain closed through August 5.

“We feel the pain of those small business owners, and we are disappointed with the delay,” said Kathleen Abels, president of the Putnam County Economic Development Corporation. “Now, at least, there’s a light at the end of the tunnel. Barring a change, the governor’s Executive Order gives gyms, indoor fitness centers and movie theaters a projected reopening date of August 6.”

The same cannot be said for much of the rest of the country, 38 states are seeing large increases in infection rates. A travel advisory has now been expanded to 19 states, with travelers from Delaware, Kansas and Oklahoma added to the list of those who must quarantine for 14 days when they come to New York State.

In New York, the Mid-Hudson region has been getting back to normal, or the new normal, since the first phase of the reopening started at the end of May. Over the past six weeks, jobs came back, restaurants opened — first for outdoor dining and then for indoor dining — and now low-risk entertainment is returning.

In Phase 4, colleges and other institutions of higher education can reopen, as can zoos, botanical gardens, nature parks, historic sites and cultural sites. Media production companies, including film, television, music and website producers, can also get back to business.

In addition to Putnam, the Mid-Hudson region includes Westchester, Rockland, Dutchess, Orange, Sullivan and Ulster counties.

For the latest information, check the county’s website at putnamcountyny.gov and the Putnam County Economic Development Corporation’s website at putnamedc.org.

For help determining whether or not your business is eligible to reopen, use the state’s reopen lookup tool.

NY FORWARD BUSINESS REOPEN LOOKUP TOOL

Putnam Looks to Phase 3: Indoor Dining, Bigger Gatherings and Personal Care Businesses Allowed

BREWSTER, NY— Phase III in Putnam and the Mid-Hudson region is upon us. The region is moving forward after 14 days of meeting the benchmark numbers required in current phase. As this stage gets into full swing residents can expect inside dining, larger gatherings, and personal care businesses coming back with some specified restrictions. Personal care businesses, beyond hair-related businesses, now will include tanning and nail salons, spas, massage therapy, and tattoo and piercing facilities. Along with inside dining, these new services will limit capacity to optimize social or physical distancing. Both will also require mask wearing by patrons and employees. These two practices, in addition to proper handwashing, remain the best avenues for public protection in all situations.  

“We are happy to continue to move toward a more fully open economy,” said MaryEllen Odell, County Executive. “Our calculated approach to watching our health measures, combined with the ingenuity, patience and commitment of our business community, has really paid off for us. We continue to move forward in the right direction.” 

 The size of permissible gatherings has been increased from 10 to 25 which is good news for families planning reunions and other events, as well as small-party planners. For restaurants and personal care establishments however, which are expanding services or re-opening, the requirements dictate that indoor capacity be limited by 50 percent.  

“The reductions in capacities have been determined with one goal in mind—to best protect both customers and employees,” said Michael J. Nesheiwat, MD, Commissioner of Health. “Much planning and thought has gone into this phased opening and graduated guidelines at the state level. This is why Putnam and the Mid-Hudson region continue to move forward successfully. We are truly grateful for the support our Putnam businesses and community organizations have shown in implementing these involved guidelines.” 

Employees of both types of establishments will be required to wear masks at all times when working. This is especially important any time they interact with customers, even if they are 6 feet or more apart. Restaurants can lose their liquor licenses if social distance requirements are not met. If patrons notice a lapse in social distancing practices while dining and feel uncomfortable, they are encouraged to consider politely informing the facility management. Making a complaint through official channels is also an option online at www.coronavirus.health.ny.gov/new-york-state-pause

Customers are required to wear masks as well. Once seated at a table in a restaurant however, patrons can remove their masks to eat, similar to the requirements with outdoor dining. In the personal care sector, some services may also necessitate clients remove their masks. Staff will direct customers by following current state-approved guidelines. Modified schedules and services may be in place and calling ahead is advised. Reservations are encouraged so that businesses can be more prepared.  

Other requirements have been developed to best ensure workers are healthy and remain that way. Restaurants are charged with conducting daily health screenings of their employees. This will include such things as temperature checks and questionnaires about symptoms, and for personal care workers COVID-19 tests will be required every 14 days. 

The mission of the Putnam County Department of Health, nationally accredited by the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB), is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services, provided directly and through collaboration, include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our County website at www.putnamcountyny.com/coronavirus; or visit our social media sites @PutnamHealthNY on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. 

Preparing for phase 3 on Tuesday June 23rd

Restaurants are set to offer indoor dining and personal care businesses are preparing to open on Tuesday June 23, when the county is expected to enter Phase 3 of the state’s reopening schedule. “Team Putnam” is on hand to help businesses plan their restarts and adapt to new requirements.

“Since the very beginning of the pandemic, Putnam County has worked as a team to support Main Street businesses and to help them endure,” Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell said. “Now we are taking a team approach to help businesses develop reopening plans that will help them thrive, keep our communities safe and encourage residents and visitors to shop Putnam.”

It’s a formidable team. In addition to County Executive Odell, the county Legislature and the Department of Health, the team includes several local business agencies. Deputy County Executive Thomas Feighery, will interface with The Putnam County Economic Development Corporation (PCEDC) to help businesses through this transition. The PCEDC’S new Small Business Advisory Committee offers a forum for small business owners to share concerns and ideas. The Putnam County Business Council and the county’s Industrial Development Agency are all on board, too, offering guidance, adaptable plans and Zoom webinars to help businesses navigate the new landscape.

“The best thing that the businesses can do in advance of reopening is make a plan and be prepared,” said Kathleen Abels, the President of PCEDC. “We can help with that. There are several new steps required and plenty of new guidelines to follow, so knowing in advance what you need to do is important. Business owners should check our website at putnamedc.org and contact us with questions.”

Phase 3, which includes reopening for nail salons, tattoo parlors and other personal care businesses in addition to indoor dining for food service establishments, is scheduled to begin Tuesday June 23 as long as the coronavirus infection rate in the Mid-Hudson region that includes Putnam does not increase.

Among the requirements for indoor restaurant seating are a maximum occupancy of 50 percent, not including staff, and tables placed six feet apart.

Tourism Director Tracey Walsh, whose work showcases all the venues that the county offers its residents, is an essential part of the team.

“Putnam residents are in a sweet spot,” Walsh said. “Their home county offers the kinds of activities that people everywhere now crave: safe, responsible, outdoor fun. With plenty of hiking, biking, golf, tennis and stunning natural beauty, the county is a great spot for residents to relax and take a staycation. It’s a good time to eat at your local restaurants, shop in your neighborhood stores and support your Main Street businesses.”

Visitors can start at the county’s tourism website, visitputnam.org.

The Putnam County Health Department, which led the way and helped curb the spread of coronavirus in our region, is part of the team and will continue to play a big role in keeping us healthy and preventing an uptick in COVID-19 cases.

Putnam County began reopening on May 26, when construction, manufacturing, curbside retail, agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting began. Phase 2 went into effect on June 9 and included Outdoor Dining, Professional Services (including hair salons & barbershops), Retail, Admin Support and Real Estate/Rental & Leasing.

But Putnam’s progress will depend on residents ongoing use of good judgment.

“We must all use common sense,” Odell said. “We must continue to exercise social distancing, wear masks and other PPE and wash our hands thoroughly and often. Anything less could increase local coronavirus numbers and lead to another PAUSE, and that’s the last thing any of us want.”

For more information, see the following useful links: 

New York Forward (State Reopening Guidelines) – https://forward.ny.gov/

Food Service Reopening Guidelines – https://www.governor.ny.gov/sites/governor.ny.gov/files/atoms/files/Food_Services_Summary_Guidelines.pdf

Putnam County Economic Development Corporation – www.putnamedc.org

Putnam County Business Council – https://putnamcountybusinesscouncil.com/

Putnam County Industrial Development Agency –  https://www.putnamcountyny.com/PutnamIDA/

Empire State Development – https://esd.ny.gov/

Putnam County Tourism Department – visitputnam.org

Deputy County Executive Thomas Feighery,

Outdoor Dining and In-store Retail Shopping Returns | County Agencies Reopen June 8

BREWSTER, NY— Phase II reopening begins in Putnam and the Mid-Hudson region, and outside dining will soon be back. Barbershop trims and “Cuts and Colors,” office-based work including Putnam County agencies, and in-store retail shopping are also some of the familiar activities that will resume at this stage. Putnam County offices will reopen June 8, with Phase II anticipated to start officially the following day. Modified schedules and services may be in place, and appointments may be necessary.  Calling ahead is advised.

“The good news is that we have local businesses that are committed to the well-being of our community,” says County Executive MaryEllen Odell. “We have counted on them in the past to sponsor our little leagues and support causes we care about. Now they have stepped up to do everything from donating meals to front line workers to implementing innovative safety protocols. Towns and municipalities are working to streamline the permit process to allow more local restaurants to begin to offer outdoor dining. The private/government partnerships are working together both for the health of our community and to support our local businesses.”

For outdoor dining, restaurants will incorporate the “new normal” safety measures such as tables spaced six feet apart. All staff will be required to wear face coverings at all times, and customers must do the same when not seated. Restaurants with outside dining areas will be required to follow 13-pages of guidelines issued by New York State Department of Health, issued on June 3. It covers everything from mandatory daily health screenings of restaurant staff to instituting 6-foot spacing in table arrangement, as well as lines for payment areas, restrooms, and food pick-up areas. Restaurants seeking to open new outdoor seating spaces such as on sidewalks, grass lawns or parking lots, are partnering with local town and village building departments. These municipalities are working to expedite permits to accommodate the  restaurants and their customers. Restaurants may be allowed to expand outdoors with PCDOH and local Code Enforcement approval.

Retail shopping, barbershops and hair salons, and County agencies are also reopening, all with strict New York State and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) requirements for face coverings and distancing. Some apprehension is normal and ultimately wise, but significant progress has been made to lower the infection rate and this is good news for residents, businesses and organizations alike.

Putnam County’s Health Commissioner Michael J. Nesheiwat, MD,  urged all employees, whether they work for small businesses, not-for-profit organizations, or the County, to remember that “If you are not feeling well or you are exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19, you should remain home. We have done a great job of ‘flattening the curve.’ It is important not to lose focus of this and to continue to pay attention and monitor our health.”

COVID-19 symptoms, which can be mild or severe, include fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, or diarrhea. These are the current symptoms presented on the CDC website at cdc.gov/coronavirus and may be updated as new symptoms are identifying with this novel illness. Additionally, some people have been found to spread the disease “silently,” meaning they are asymptomatic and have no symptoms or their symptoms are so mild they don’t know they are sick.  People should err on the side of caution and if not feeling completely well, to stay or work from home whenever possible. This is also the reason for the mandatory use of face coverings in public spaces, where distancing is not always possible. Examples of these types of situations are in hallways, elevators and small reception or waiting areas.

The mission of the Putnam County Department of Health, nationally accredited by the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB), is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services, provided directly and through collaboration, include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our County website at www.putnamcountyny.com/coronavirus; or visit our social media sites @PutnamHealthNY on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Governor Announces Dental Practices Permitted to Reopen

Guidelines updated to ensure safety for patients and staff

BREWSTER, NY— Governor Cuomo announced dentists can begin seeing patients for routine dental care starting on June 1. Originally slated to reopen in “Phase 2,” dentists have been given the green light sooner than expected with declining NYS coronavirus cases, hospitalizations, intubations and deaths. 

“Our dental health care providers in Putnam have been team players from the start of this pandemic,” says County Executive MaryEllen Odell. “Some donated masks and gloves to our frontline workers and all have now invested time and resources to ensure safety for their patients and staff as they return to their offices.” 

From physical distancing to personal protective equipment, New York State has shared a twelve-page document which includes a link for providers to affirm their receipt of and agreement to follow the guidance set forth.  

For dental health care providers, proper use of personal protective equipment is nothing new. While dental settings are traditionally designed with patient and provider safety in mind, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), dentistry in the time of the novel coronavirus goes further to balance the need to provide necessary services while minimizing risk to patients and dental health care personnel. 

On March 16, the American Dental Association (ADA) was one of the first national professional health associations to recommend postponement of all but urgent or emergency procedures. Just over two months later, the ADA designed an interim return to work toolkit for dental practitioners. Together with documents from the CDC, and now New York State, the comprehensive guidance addresses ways dentists and hygienists can reduce the risk of coronavirus transmission before, during and after visits.  

Dr. Daniel Doyle, of Doyle Dental and president of the Putnam County Board of Health says, “The dentists of Putnam County are thrilled to be back seeing their patients. They are now seeing all patients for routine procedures, not just for emergencies.”  

As dental offices begin planning to reopen their doors they may be adapting their offices to meet new safety state and federal guidelines. Doyle Dental’s website and patient correspondence describes new safety protocols. Some changes patients can expect as they return to their dentist’s office include plexiglass partitions at reception, waiting room modifications including chair spacing, removal of magazines and mask requirements as well as screening for symptoms of illness. Additionally, because many dentists donated their personal protective equipment (PPE) to essential workers and closed their doors for over two months, some may have had to rebuild their PPE stock. 

Modifications to dental care will impact everything from pre-appointment communication to provider and patient interactions. According to the ADA, dental office staff may call patients for a preliminary health screening prior to an appointment. Patients may notice their dentist or dental hygienist wearing additional protective gear such as a face shield and gown. While the state allows offices to begin reopening as of June 1, Dr. Doyle recommends residents check with their local dentist regarding specific safety measures and exact reopening dates. 

The mission of the Putnam County Department of Health, nationally accredited by the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB), is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services, provided directly and through collaboration, include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our County website at www.putnamcountyny.com/coronavirus; or visit our social media sites @PutnamHealthNY on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. 

After a nine week pause, some businesses in the Mid-Hudson Region will reopen

After a nine week pause, some businesses in the Mid-Hudson Region will reopen on Tuesday, including construction, manufacturing, retail (for curbside pickup only), wholesale trade and agriculture.

The seven-county region, which includes Westchester, Rockland, Putnam, Dutchess, Orange, Sullivan and Ulster counties, has shown a significant downward trend in the spread of coronavirus and met the seven metrics the state required to enter Phase 1 of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s four-phase reopening plan.

“The counties in this region have worked hard to get to this stage. We stayed home, stayed safe and flattened the curve, and now we are eager to get back to business,” Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell said. “The businesses that will reopen will make safety their first priority.  We want people working, and we also want to keep our communities safe.”

Main Street businesses will need guidance during the reopening and county officials will be there for them, Marc Molinaro, the Dutchess County Executive, said.

“We were smart, we were vigilant, and, now, we begin a new chapter,” Molinaro said. “As we begin to reopen, we will keep supporting our businesses, families and farmers. As we keep making smart choices, we will protect lives while helping our community get back to life.”

All seven county executives who are part of the Mid-Hudson Regional Control Room that will monitor the metrics, welcomed the transition to Phase 1.

“While it is critical that we begin reopening the economy and getting people back to work, we will approach this first phase and each additional phase with ‘safety first, people always’ as our motto,” said Rockland County Executive Ed Day.

The lessons learned over the past few months will now be put to good use, Steve Neuhaus, the Orange County Executive, said

“Our region is anxious to get back to work and we look forward to helping businesses as they restart our local economy,” Neuhaus said. “Practical social distancing and wearing masks will help us open all phases as soon as possible.”

A major part of the Phase 1 plan includes having contact tracers notify those who have been exposed to COVID-19.  Contact tracers throughout the region will be trained this weekend and begin work on Tuesday.  The region’s contact tracers include a mix of health department employees, other county employees, summer interns and volunteers from the Medical Reserve Corps.

Phase 1 will last for two weeks while the number of COVID-19 cases in the Mid-Hudson region are closely monitored. If the downward trend reverses and the numbers increase, the state can put the region back on pause.

But if the epidemic continues to subside, the region will progress to Phase 2, which includes professional services, retail, administrative support and real estate.  Phase 3 includes restaurants and food service and the last phase, Phase 4, includes arts, entertainment, recreation and education.

The state’s seven criteria for reopening included: a 14-day decline in net hospitalizations; a decline in death; fewer than 2 new hospitalizations per 100,000 residents; at least 30 percent availability of hospital beds; 30 percent availability of ICU beds; and an aggressive testing and contact tracing program.

Businesses seeking more information on the reopening guidelines should see the Forward New York Business Opening Lookup Toolkit  at businessexpress.ny.gov/app/nyforward)

Putnam County Prepares to Reopen Economic Development Arm Urges Residents to Stay Loyal and Shop Local

In an effort to help small businesses reopen and recover from the economic crisis caused by the Covid-19 shutdown, the Putnam County Economic Development Corporation (PCEDC) has formed an advisory committee of local small businesses to help provide, share and disseminate information as we accelerate toward a post-Coronavirus world.

The PCEDC’s Small Business Advisory Committee represents a broad cross section of industries and business leaders from every corner of the county.  Members include Tom Feighery, Fiddler’s Green Pub and Putnam County Project Manager;  Bryan Kelly, AON Physical Therapy;  Ed Galligan, Carmel Flower Shop;  Chris DeBellis, Contractor & Assistant Town Code Enforcement Officer;  Maria Quezada, Six Diamonds Tree Service and Landscaping;  Brian Ledley, Ledley Food Service;  Stephanie Tomlinson, Salon Uccelli;  Kimball Gell, Dolly’s Restaurant at Garrison’s Landing;  Nisim Sachakov, Limni & Mezzaluna Restaurants;  Angela Briante, Briante Realty Group; and Emily Simoness, SPACE on Ryder Farm.  PCEDC Board members on the Committee include Richard Weiss, CPA, Founder and Consultant Weiss Advisory Group, Margie Keith, retired Cornell Cooperative Extension Executive Director, Bob Zubrycki, Concertmaster for the American Symphony Orchestra and Walter Recher, SmallBall Marketing.

“This is a forum for small businesses to voice their concerns and share ideas that will help them to survive and prepare for a new economic reality” said Kathleen Abels, President, PCEDC.  “Since the pandemic shut down life as we once knew it, we have seen many small businesses suffer and worry about their ability to carry on.   We implore county residents to stay loyal to Putnam’s businesses by continuing to Shop Putnam now and to hold on just a little longer until more area businesses are allowed to reopen.”

“Putnam County is one community, the same community that encompasses the heroes of the pandemic, such as health care workers, first responders, delivery  people, sanitation and utility workers, grocers and other essential businesses that have continued to serve us at their own peril,” said PCEDC Board Chairman Daniel Leary, Esquire.

The PCEDC has posted on their website, putnamedc.org, ongoing COVID-19 Related Business Resources to assist businesses to stay abreast of opportunities and orders from the State and Federal Government.  NYS Industry Re-Opening Guidelines, including mandatory practices, recommended best practices and templates for business safety plans, can be found on Forward New York at https://forward.ny.gov/industries-reopening-phase

The PCEDC Small Business Advisory Committee will continue to meet during the coming months to promote Shop Putnam and to develop strategies to adjust to new trends in the way we think, live, work, learn, shop, travel and entertain.

For more information, contact Kathleen Abels, President, Putnam County Economic Development Corporation (845) 242-2212

About Putnam County Economic Development Corporation (PCEDC)

The mission of the Putnam County Economic Development Corporation (PCEDC) is to drive the economic vitality of Putnam County by working to attract appropriate new businesses, broaden the County’s tax base, retain and grow employment opportunities within the County and aid in the enhancement of the quality of life for residents. The PCEDC acts as a facilitator, bringing together businesses, government agencies and other stakeholders.  Recently, the PCEDC has pivoted its focus to assist existing Main Street businesses to survive and recover from the economic impact of COVID-19.

For more information, please visit https://putnamedc.org/

Putnam County Economic Development Corporation Announces Response to COVID-19 Economic Crisis

Carmel, NY – The Putnam County Economic Development Corporation (PCEDC) today announced that it will be shifting into “response and recovery” mode to address the economic fallout wreaked by COVID-19.

The PCEDC is committed to helping county businesses survive and recover from the financial disaster incurred by business shutdowns necessitated to diminish the spread of the coronavirus.

“It’s a new world.  Our team is dedicated and we are nimble enough to address changing needs in this unprecedented time,” stated Kathleen Abels, President of the PCEDC.  “The Main Street businesses are an essential part of the fabric of our community.  We must make every effort to help them.”

The PCEDC is a non-profit organization funded by Putnam County that acts as the county’s external marketing agency for the economic and employment development.  Normally, the PCEDC works to attract appropriate new businesses, retain and grow employment opportunities and broaden the tax base in order to enhance the quality of life in Putnam County.

Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell joined Abels and her team on a conference call Friday to brainstorm ideas for assisting local business in this difficult time.

“Putnam County relies on our Main Street economy to offset property taxes, provide employment opportunities and foster our caring community values,” Odell said. “These businesses constantly work behind the scenes to support our non-profits, including local  sports clubs, veterans groups, cancer support events like Relay for Life and much, much more.  They have always been there for our community, now we need to be there for them.”

The PCEDC has added a COVID-19 Related Business Resources banner to the opening page of its website, www.putnamedc.org, to direct businesses and not-for-profits to the most current programs available to assist them.  These will be updated as needed and presently include:

  • Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), which is administered by financial institutions and which provides small businesses with funds to pay up to 8 weeks of payroll costs including benefits.
  • The Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Emergency Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL), Debt Relief Program and Express Bridge Loans to help business owners navigate through this labyrinth of uncertainty.
  • Community Capital of New York’s Emergency Express Loan of up to $10,000 for Small Businesses in the Hudson Valley impacted by COVID-19.
  • Congress’ Small Business Owner’s Guide to the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act.

The PCEDC remains grateful for the continued support of Putnam County and urges everyone to patronize local businesses.  Below are a few suggestions:

  • Thank essential businesses and their employees for remaining open to serve us. While most of us stay at home, these dedicated individuals are working hard to perform extra cleaning and other services to keep customers and employees safe
  • Order Take-Out – many area restaurants deliver; patronize them as often you can
  • Purchase Gift Cards – for a friend or family member
  • Tip More Generously – help businesses retain their employees
  • Shop Putnam/Local Online – buy what you can and help them remain open
  • Spread the Word! – go to social media pages and post a positive comment or recommendation, and share it with others
  • Take an online class – from local gyms, health clubs and yoga studios
  • Check area businesses’ websites and social media pages for updates and services
  • Check area arts and non-profit organization’s websites and social media for additional online content

About Putnam County Economic Development Corporation

The Putnam County Economic Development Corporation is a 501(c)(6) Public-Private Corporation formed in 1996 to promote the economic vitality of Putnam County.  It acts as a facilitator, bringing together businesses, government agencies and resources.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Putnam County Economic Development Corporation

Contact Name: Kathleen Abels

(845) 808-1021
Kathleen.Abels@putnamcountyny.gov

https://putnamedc.org/