All Putnam County Government Offices, with the exception of essential services will be CLOSED Wednesday, 8/5/20

After meeting with the ICS Team and evaluating the impact of the current weather conditions, Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell has closed all Putnam County Government Offices with the exception of essential services for Wednesday, August 5, 2020.

This includes:

Our public transportation system which includes the Croton Falls Commuters and fixed route PART System

“While the storm has left our area, the impact of Isaias have left the majority of our residents without power and many roadways impassable”, said County Executive Odell.  “In addition many of our government facilities are without power”.

NYSEG and Central Hudson continue to work on restoration efforts. Currently NYSEG reports over 33,000 customers without power. Highway crews, who worked through the night, will continue their efforts to open roadways.

All Non-Essential Putnam County Government Offices on a 2 hour delay for Wed August 4, 2020

After meeting with the ICS Team and evaluating the impact of the Tropical Storm Isaias, Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell has delayed the opening of all Putnam County Government Offices with the exception of essential services for 2 hours on Wednesday, August 5, 2020. Offices that normally open at 8:00 AM will open at 10:00 AM and offices that normally open at 9:00 AM will open at 11:00 AM. 

In addition to the delayed opening of non-essential government offices, please note the following: 

Our public transportation system which includes the Croton Falls Commuters and fixed route PART System will be closed for the entire day 

Employees should check the Employee Weather Help Line at 845-808-4087 tomorrow morning for any additional updates. Please use caution when traveling to work as there may still be downed trees and power lines.

With wires and trees down across the county, Putnam County residents are asked to stay off roadways to allow highway crews to clear

“Highway crews have been working through the storm keeping critical roads open”, said County Executive MaryEllen Odell, “in order for them to work effectively residents are asked to limit travel and stay off roadways.

The Putnam County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) reports 80 roads totally impassable and 40 roads with debris but passable throughout the county.

NYSEG reports that currently 33,600 customers are without power with Central Hudson reporting 1300. 

NYSEG and Central Hudson Gas and Electric are working with our highway departments to safely clear downed trees and branches.  NYSEG and Central Hudson both report that mutual aid crews have been assigned to our area and are ready to respond once the winds allow safe operation of equipment.

Residents are reminded to report any outages to their local utility company.  NYSEG can be contacted at 800-572-1131. Central Hudson Gas & Electric can be contacted at 845-452-2700. Both companies have an app available for download to track outages.

Putnam County 9-1-1 remains fully manned and should only be used for emergency requests for Police, Fire or EMS. 

 

Safety Near Fallen Wires:

  • You can’t tell if a power line is energized just by looking at it. You should assume that all fallen power lines are live and proceed with extreme caution.
  • If you see a fallen power line, stay at least 30 feet away from it and anything touching it. The ground around a power line and any objects it contacts, such as a fence, may be energized. Call 911 to report the condition so that emergency responders and Central Hudson or NYSEG are notified.
  • If a downed wire comes in contact with your vehicle, stay inside and wait for help. If you must get out because of fire or other danger, jump clear of the vehicle to avoid any contact with the vehicle and the ground at the same time. Land with your feet together and hop with feet together or shuffle away; don’t run or stride. 
  • Do not attempt to move a fallen power line or anything else in contact with it using an object such as a broom or stick. Even non-conductive materials or cloth can conduct electricity if slightly wet.

Generator Safety: 

  • NEVER operate a generator in an enclosed space, even with a window or door open. This includes inside your home, basement or garage. Doing so can lead to a potentially lethal build-up of colorless, odorless, poisonous carbon monoxide gas.

  • Only have an experienced electrician connect a generator to your home. Improperly installed generators may overload circuits, cause a fire or shock hazard, and can result in serious injury or property damage. Improperly installed generators can also back-feed onto electric lines and endanger repair crews working to restore service.

  • Plug appliances directly into the generator using a heavy-duty, outdoor-rated extension cord that is designed to handle the wattage of all the appliances being connected.

  • Generators should be sized to meet the needs of the appliances they are connected to. If too small, appliances can be damaged, and the generator can overheat, creating a fire hazard.

As the result of the high winds and heavy rain from Tropical Storm Isaiah the County reports numerous road closures and wide spread power outages. All Putnam County Non-Essential Offices have been closed

County Executive MaryEllen Odell remains at the Putnam County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) with the ICS Team.

As predicted this storm packed a very powerful punch, closing roads and disrupting power across the entire region”, said County Executive Odell. “Our highway crews continue to stay focused on making roadways passable however we rely on the power crews to make downed wires safe before our crews can safely remove the debris”.

“With power out across most of our government campuses, we have closed our non-essential government offices”, continued Odell. 

The EOC will continue to monitor the weather. The National Weather Service is showing that the high winds should dissipate by 7:00 PM and the storms should move out of our area after 9:00 PM this evening.

NYSEG reports that currently 33,800 customers are without power with Central Hudson reporting 1300. 

NYSEG and Central Hudson Gas and Electric will continue to work on “Make Safe” efforts which allows our Highway Departments to safely clear downed trees and branches.  NYSEG and Central Hudson both report that mutual aid crews have been assigned to our area and are ready to respond once the winds allow safe operation of equipment.

Residents are reminded to report any outages to their local utility company.  NYSEG can be contacted at 800-572-1131. Central Hudson Gas & Electric can be contacted at 845-452-2700. Both companies have an app available for download to track outages.

Putnam County 9-1-1 remains fully manned and should only be used for emergency requests for Police, Fire or EMS. 

 

Safety Near Fallen Wires:

  • You can’t tell if a power line is energized just by looking at it. You should assume that all fallen power lines are live and proceed with extreme caution.
  • If you see a fallen power line, stay at least 30 feet away from it and anything touching it. The ground around a power line and any objects it contacts, such as a fence, may be energized. Call 911 to report the condition so that emergency responders and Central Hudson or NYSEG are notified.
  • If a downed wire comes in contact with your vehicle, stay inside and wait for help. If you must get out because of fire or other danger, jump clear of the vehicle to avoid any contact with the vehicle and the ground at the same time. Land with your feet together and hop with feet together or shuffle away; don’t run or stride. 
  • Do not attempt to move a fallen power line or anything else in contact with it using an object such as a broom or stick. Even non-conductive materials or cloth can conduct electricity if slightly wet.

 

 Please continue to monitor NY-Alert for updates

From Carmel to Clemson: Remembering “Marie”

Putnam County Archives, February 19, 2020 – Recently, the Putnam County Historian’s Office was contacted by Mari Rosalie Noorai, Curator of Education & Interpretation, Department of Historic Properties at Clemson University, South Carolina. She was pursuing the identity of “Marie”, an African American servant featured in a photo in Clemson’s archives. Noorai’s department researches black history and interprets stories about African Americans in the “narrative of the total life experience” as it relates to the Clemson and Calhoun families of South Carolina.

In August 1871, “Marie” took baby Isabella Floride Lee upon her knee as they sat for a photograph. Years later, this tintype would be donated to Clemson University by Margaret Calhoun, the daughter of the baby in the picture, and great-granddaughter of Thomas Green and Anna Calhoun Clemson who bequeathed their Fort Hill plantation to South Carolina to found Clemson University. Far from that original southern plantation, this photograph was likely taken in an unlikely town – Carmel, New York.

Baby Isabella was the daughter of Gideon Lee, the son of another Gideon Lee who was a New York City mayor and a U.S. Representative, and Floride, daughter of Thomas and Anna Clemson. They were married in 1869 and moved to the large Hazen Hill farm in Carmel, where they built “Leeside”, a stately, 17-room colonial mansion overlooking Lake Gleneida, surrounded by hundreds of acres of farmland, woods and orchards.

Just weeks before the photo was taken, young mother Floride died and Gideon depended on Marie as his daughter’s nurse for the next nine years. When Gideon eventually remarried, Marie returned south in 1879 to work with another family, while the Lees remained in Carmel. “Marie” was the only name on record for her in the Clemson and Calhoun families’ collection.
Gideon Lee died in 1894 and his will is on file in the probate records at the Putnam County Archives. Even though many years had passed since Marie had left Putnam County, Gideon remembered her in his will, leaving an annuity to “Marie Venning, my daughter’s colored nurse.”

With the information from the Putnam County Historian’s Office, Clemson University was able to match Marie Elizabeth Venning’s name to the bequest dated 1871 in the will of Anna Clemson, who, following the death of her daughter Floride (the baby in the picture) left an impressive sum to Marie in gratitude to the woman who had cared for her only grandchild, as “a token of our appreciation of her devotion and fidelity.”

“This story is just one example of the importance of our archives and partnership with other historic institutions,” says Michael Bartolotti, Putnam County Clerk and Records Management Officer. “It’s a long way from Carmel to Clemson, but our records have now added to the narrative of Clemson University.”
For more information on the Putnam County Historian’s Office and Archives, visit: www.putnamcountyny.com/countyhistorian

  • Photo caption:  “Marie” and Isabella Floride Lee.
    Photo Credit: Fort Hill: National Historic Landmark Collection, Clemson University
  • Photo caption:  “Leeside”, Gideon Lee’s home, located on Hazen Hill, Carmel, NY.
    Photo Credit: Putnam County Archives
  • Photo Caption:  Will of Gideon Lee, Series 34, No. 3390
    Photo Credit: Putnam County Archives

 

Public Health Efforts Continue as Putnam County Comes Back to Life

BREWSTER, NY—A deliberate, phased-in approach to reopening began in other parts of the state. Now its Putnam and the Mid-Hudson region’s turn. Deaths from COVID-19 have continued to decline and contact tracer training is underway, so phase one has begun. 

“We have been watching carefully around the State and we know what a safe re-opening looks like,” County Executive MaryEllen Odell said. “It is a delicate process. Getting the economy moving again is crucial, which is why Putnam County formed the ‘Reopen Putnam Safely Task Force.’ We must all do our part and not become complacent. Following the guidance will ensure the virus continues to decline. Large gatherings and crowds still need to be avoided, as we continue to practice social and physical distancing. The good news is that over the Memorial Day weekend, we saw residents at Putnam beaches showing restraint and being responsible. ”  

The key is to remain diligent in practicing the tried-and-true public health practices of good hygiene, social distancing and now keeping gatherings to groups of less than ten people. By keeping groups small, contact tracing can be managed. According to the NYS reopening benchmarks, thirty contact tracers are needed per 100,000 residents. However, NYS reopening requirements for Putnam stipulated that the county identify 84 contact tracers in order to track and identify people who may become sick and advise them on how to avoid spreading the virus further.  

Putnam County’s Health Commissioner Michael J. Nesheiwat, MD, also emphasized the importance of continuing public health efforts, saying, “Everyone must remain strong and continue to practice social distancing, hand washing and wearing face coverings. With these practices we have flattened the curve. With these practices we can keep it flattened. Then we can continue to reopen and get everyone back to work. The key words are caution, patience and perseverance.”  

In Putnam, as around the state, Phase One begins with the reopening of businesses where physical distancing can be most easily preserved. Construction, farms and landscaping businesses, manufacturing, and wholesale trade are some of the businesses that are getting the green light first. Retail establishments as well can open, limited to curbside or in-store pickup or drop off.  If all proceeds with reason and restraint and hot spots are quickly identified through contact tracing and testing, progress will continue. If lapses occur, it will take some time for that to be reflected in the numbers of positive cases and hospitalizations. 

Anonymous cellphone data shows that people across the country initially took very seriously the government’s advice to stay at home. Now with the warmer weather, the easing of restrictions in some areas, and nearly everyone tired of staying home, more people are venturing out more. This is all good for the economy. If public health practices can remain in place, then resurges can be contained, the economy will continue to revive itself. Putnam residents can continue to do their part, both for the health of the community and to support local businesses. 

The Southeast Museum

History give us many things, a sense of who we are, a sense of pride, an opportunity to showcase our heroes, a perspective of the struggles we have endured and the knowledge that together we will get through this.

 

We are happy to say our programs have been and are available through Zoom sessions. We have even added a few new programs.

Ongoing Programs
Hey Neighbor– Weekly meet up. Have your history questions answered and say hello to your friends and neighbors. Wednesdays at 2:00pm
History Exchange – Monthly local history talk and discussion. Next Exchange is Wednesday May 13 at 5:30pm
History Book Club – The last Thursday of the month.
Documentary Club – Watch documentaries and meet to discuss

Coming soon
Virtual Local History Tours
History video game

To Register/For More Information: director@southeastmuseum.org

About the Southeast Museum: Established in 1963, the Southeast Museum offers exhibits on the history of the Town of Southeast, including the early American Circus, the Harlem Line Railroad, the Tilly Foster Mine, the Borden Milk Condensery, and the Croton Reservoir System.

Remember to check out our Facebook page to see historic images and event information.

Nearly 140 Putnam County residents were tested for COVID-19 today at the PCDOH drive-thru testing clinic.

Nearly 140 Putnam County residents were tested for COVID-19 today at the PCDOH drive-thru testing clinic. PCDOH is planning additional drive-thru testing -details will be released soon.

 

 

X COVID HEALTH

TEST