Capture

County Clerk’s Office Press Release

Dennis J. Sant
County Clerk

Michael C. Bartolotti
First Deputy County Clerk

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, November 12, 2014

PUTNAM COUNTY CLERK’S OFFICE APPLAUDS THE SIGNING OF LEGISLATION WHICH ELIMINATES FEE FOR VETERAN’S DISTINCTION ON DRIVERS’ LICENSES AND NON-DRIVER ID CARDS

Putnam County Clerk Dennis J. Sant and First Deputy Clerk Michael C. Bartolotti today thanked Governor Andrew Cuomo for signing legislation which eliminates the fee for the addition of a Veteran’s distinction on a driver’s license or
non-driver identification card prior to renewal. The Bill unanimously passed both the New York State Senate (Bill S5955A) and Assembly (Bill A8231A) earlier in the year.

“With the Governor signing this legislation into law, Veterans across New York State have the right to proudly display their service and status on their drivers’ licenses and non-driver identification cards at no additional cost,” said Bartolotti. “This is another way to honor the men and women who have served our great nation not only on Veteran’s Day, but every day.”

In 2013, a law was enacted to allow honorably discharged service men and women the option of having their Veteran status on drivers’ licenses and non-driver identification cards. Unfortunately, the State DMV interpreted this law to require a Veteran to pay a $12.50 amendment fee to add the Veteran status when requested prior to the renewal date of the document. County Clerks throughout New York State rallied against the imposition of this unnecessary fee.

NYSACC passed a Resolution setting forth the County Clerks’ position that any fees associated with displaying the Veteran status on a NYS driver’s license or non-driver ID card should be waived and should not be imposed. In 2014, this position was of the highest priority in the County Clerks’ 2014 Legislative Agenda which was delivered to members of the State Legislature.

“I am pleased that the Governor has joined County Clerks who are committed to honoring those who have served our great nation by signing this legislation into law,” said Sant.

###

For further information, call: Office of the Putnam County Clerk at 845-808-1142 Ext. 49301

thPZKXOVMD

Questions about Ebola?

New York State has launched a new State information line to answer questions from New Yorkers about Ebola. The free info line is 1-800-861-2280. Trained staff will answer 24/7. The line is for public health information purposes only, not for those in need of medical attention.

worlddoctor

Emerging Infections: Enterovirus D68 and Ebola

The Health Department strives daily to ensure the health and safety of Putnam County residents. Trained staff members monitor the health status of the community in order to identify emerging infections and work with community partners to reduce transmission of disease. Partners include the healthcare providers, hospitals, schools, laboratories, and the EMS community.

Enterovirus D68

Ebola

 

thWIDLZ5P7

PUTNAM COUNTY CLERK’S OFFICE WARNS RESIDENTS OF TELEPHONE ‘SCAM”

Capture

Friday, August 1, 2014

PUTNAM COUNTY CLERK’S OFFICE WARNS RESIDENTS OF TELEPHONE ‘SCAM”

First Deputy County Clerk Michael C. Bartolotti today warned Putnam County residents of a telephone scam which claims the phone call recipient will have a warrant for their arrest if they fail to dial an out-of-state phone number by 5:00 p.m. that same day and make payment.  In this current scam, the caller ID appears as a number from the County Clerk’s Office and the fraudulent person identified herself as calling from the Putnam County Clerk’s Office.  In a message left to one resident, the phone number to return the call was (423) 536-6354 which is a telemarketing agency in Tennessee.

“It is very important for residents to know that the Clerk’s Office does not make phone calls pertaining to warrants or demanding that anyone make payment over the phone,” said First Deputy County Clerk Michael Bartolotti.  “If you receive this phone call, do not return the call and never send money to an unknown caller who demands payment.”

The Putnam County Clerk’s Office has been notified by a resident who received this type of call.  “We are alerting residents to be aware of this scam so others won’t be sending their hard earned money to these criminals,” added Bartolotti.

Bartolotti provided further guidance on how to handle these types of scams.  “People should never provide personal information over the phone when receiving these types of calls.  If you do get a phone call from any purported government agency requesting personal information or a credit card payment over the phone, hand up immediately and contact the government agency’s public telephone number for clarification.

Bartolotti also urges those receiving these fraudulent calls to contact the Putnam County Clerk’s Office at 845-808-1142 Ext. 49301 and file a report.  Bartolotti has also alerted the New York State Attorney General’s Office for further review of these types of scams.

1

Putnam is Paying for the Perks of New York City with New Energy Capacity Zone

Dear Editor,

As of May 1, residents in Putnam and the rest of the Hudson Valley will have double digit increases on their utility bills without any new benefit or service being provided to the local communities. The implementation of the new Energy Capacity Zone, which was brainchild of the New York Independent System Operator and approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, attempts to resolve the future energy shortfall caused by the consumption in New York City and Long Island by allowing energy generators to increase rates to communities in the Lower Hudson Valley now.

Residents can anticipate up to a 10 percent rate hike and business owners are expecting up to an 18 percent increase.

As the county executive for Putnam County, I know all too well how the needs of New York City and Long Island fall on the backs of the people in the Lower Hudson Valley. We are already subject to the MTA Payroll Tax and the MS4 regulations which cause extra expenses and few benefits to our communities. The new capacity zone is expected to impose a $230 million increase in energy costs for Hudson Valley residents in the coming year and almost $500 million over the next three years.

Our residents cannot afford this and they should not have to bear this burden. The only ones benefitting from the NYISO’s insistence that the zoning start now is the existing energy generating companies that already charge the highest rates in the state.

Technology has forced our society to rely on energy, but charging more will not help deliver a better product or control consumers’ usage. Instead the higher rates will force residents to have less discretionary income and could stall any growth in the region’s economy.

Alternative ways to generate and transmit energy need to be explored and a comprehensive plan should be in place before communities are forced to pay for hypothetical solutions.

In March, I joined Senator Charles Schumer, Reps. Sean Patrick Maloney, Chris Gibson and State Senator Terry Gipson in urging the FERC to delay the implantation of the new capacity zone until 2017 when more information would be available and other solutions considered. We need all of our local representatives to unite with us for the sake of our constituents.

I have called on Albany to take action. I am still waiting. We need our representatives in the NYS Senate and Assembly to work on putting a stop to the new capacity zoning. They need to be our voice and we are saying, “We cannot afford to pay for the needs of New York City.”

This is not a partisan issue. The issue is simple. Residents and businesses in Putnam County and the rest of the Lower Hudson Valley should not have to pay higher energy bills just because their neighbors to the south will one day use more energy than can currently be generated.

Contact your local, state and federal representatives and urge them to join the fight against the new capacity zone.

Sincerely,

MaryEllen Odell
Putnam County Executive

 

2

Opt Out

PUTNAM COUNTY CLERK REMINDS ALL PISTOL PERMIT HOLDERS “IT’S NOT TOO LATE TO FILE YOUR OPT-OUT FORM”

March 26, 2014
PUTNAM COUNTY CLERK REMINDS ALL PISTOL PERMIT HOLDERS “IT’S NOT TOO LATE TO FILE YOUR OPT-OUT FORM” 

To All Putnam County Pistol Permit Holders:

Putnam County is continuing to fight for the right to protect our citizens from an unwarranted invasion of their safety and personal privacy. Putnam County Clerk Dennis J. Sant and First Deputy Clerk Michael C. Bartolotti have one thing to say to all Putnam County Pistol Permit Holders; that is, “It’s not too late to file your opt-out form.”  RUN, don’t walk, to your Putnam County Clerk’s Office so you can help us help you.

During our latest wave of community outreach to our pistol permit holders to assist in the filing of their opt out forms, we learned that this provision in the law, more notably the 120 day moratorium period, was very confusing to the public it was designed to protect.  The wording of the law, along with its misinterpretation by certain media outlets, led to confusion by the public that once the moratorium period ended no opt out forms would be accepted.  We just want to stress to all pistol permit holders that is not the case and nothing could be further from the truth.

Again, we urge all pistol permit holders that if you have not done so already, please remit an Opt-Out form to this office as soon as possible.  Currently, the only protection you may have from disclosure is to have an approved Opt Out form in your permit file.    The sooner you get this completed form back to our office, the sooner your personal information will remain confidential.  Contact Michael Bartolotti, 1st Deputy County Clerk, at 845-808-1142 Ext. 49303 to file your opt-out forms and with any questions or concerns you may have. 

 

Putnam County Pistol License holder FOIL “Opt Out” Form

If you are a pistol license holder or know of somebody who is this may be of interest to you;

As you may be aware New York State has made available an “Opt Out” form for all pistol license holders who wish to exempt their name and address from disclosure. County Clerk Dennis Sant and County Executive MaryEllen Odell want to make sure all pistol license holders have the opportunity to take advantage of this new provision.

If a pistol license holder wishes to “Opt Out” of disclosure they may do the following:

  • Please download the attached form
  • Complete all relevant parts of the form
  • Sign and date the form
  • Return the completed form to the Putnam County Clerk’s Office either in person, or via U.S. mail at 40 Gleneida Avenue, Room 100, Carmel, New York 10512

Should you have any questions regarding this matter please contact us at 845-808-1142 extension 49307.

 

bicentennialsmall

Putnam County Market Overview 2014

Putnam County Market Overview 2014

Well, what do you know? According to data from the Hudson Gateway MLS footprint of Westchester, Putnam, Rockland and Orange counties, the Putnam County housing market is holding its own.

A year to date comparison over 2012 indicates a 13.8% percentage increase in closed transactions and a 2.8% median sales price increase in Single Family Houses. Our inventory shows a slight decrease 0f 3.8% while neighboring Westchester boasted a 9.5 % decrease in inventory. All in all the numbers point to a market going in the direction of a steady recovery.

Breaking down the data by price ranges gives a little more insight into Putnam County’s strengthening market.

By the end of the 4th quarter, 316 homes were sold at prices ranging from $100k-300k, which means there were 316 REAL buyers. Currently, there are 227 active listings with an absorption rate of 8.63 months.

This is quite a contrast to homes in the $850k to $1million range with 34 currently active and 16 sold in 2013, which means 16 REAL buyers and an absorption rate of 25 months.

Continuing with homes in the $300k to $500k range with 231currently active and 274 sold in 2013, which means 274 REAL buyers and an absorption rate of 10 months.

And lastly homes in the $500k to $800k range with 124 currently active and 95 sold in 2013, which means 95 REAL buyers and an absorption rate of 16 months.

The contrasting numbers by price range are a reflection of the market boom in the early 2000s, where the shortage of higher end homes in Westchester caused a price hike and a new construction boom in Putnam and perhaps an oversupply of homes over $500k before the economy took its downturn.

That said, Putnam County does possess some things in its favor when it comes to attracting buyers in all price ranges.

•We have a low unemployment rate of 5.8%.

•We are an affluent community with an median household income of $92,711.

•Since 2009, Putnam County’s crime rate has decreased 34.2% making it the most improved county in New York State in this metric.

•Our home ownership rate is 83.4% which is much higher than surrounding counties.

•We are still a small, closely knit community with our population just under 100,000.

There is room for even more optimism. Our current County administration works hand in hand with our EDC/IDA, Chambers of Commerce, and Tourism and is focused on quality of life issues such as infrastructure improvements, revitalization, smart development, and transportation improvements. The county has even partnered with local Realtors to sell county owned properties. Putnam County is a place that has astutely avoided overdevelopment and over commercialization and instead is famous for its bodies of water, parks and mountains. As we well know the county still lies within a short, easy commute to Manhattan.

2014 is shaping up to be a banner year as far as sales volume is concerned. We know that the health of the housing market relies heavily on the greater economy. National political debates involving Health Care reform, the recent government shutdown, the sequester and debt ceiling surely do not help things. The fact that Putnam County shares the region’s issue with continually increasing taxes, offers less services than neighboring counties, and has a less developed infrastructure makes it a challenge to attract more buyers to the county.

Luckily, these issues are balanced by the pleasant lifestyle offered by the open, green spaces, bodies of water and privacy we have to offer. Putnam County is poised for growth. We have many revitalization and infrastructure improvements in the works such as Envision Brewster, a new sewer district in Kent, improvements in downtown Mahopac being discussed. Coupled with our beautiful surroundings and demographics we will continue on our path of housing recovery.

This is where we as the Realtor community come in. I encourage more fellow HGAR members to get involved at a local level to watch dog our municipal governments and partner with our

elected officials to slow down the tax increases, and foster sustainable improvement to the quality of life.

We can make a difference. While we face our challenges, Putnam County should enjoy a favorable real estate market in the near future, while active community leaders work together to build an even stronger community and an attractive place to live, work and play.

Jennifer Maher,

Associate Broker J. Philip Real Estate LLC

Broker/Managing Partner J.Philip Commercial Group

Chairwoman Putnam County Chambers of Commerce

bicentennialsmall

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: “POLAR VORTEX”

MaryEllen Odell
Putnam County Executive
(845) 808-1001

January 7, 2014

“POLAR VORTEX”

With the Artic freeze continuing to affect the Northeast, the Putnam County Court House experienced problems this morning.  At approximately 8:00 am a fire sprinkler head on the fourth floor east wing burst, partially flooding the 4th & 3rd floor.  Commissioner Fred Pena said “due to the quick action of the Highway staff, crews who were in the building making rounds, when the sprinkler head burst, were able to shut of the water to minimize damage”. 

Administrative Judge for the 9th Judicial District Alan D Scheinkman said “we’ve had a number of weather related issues in several of our court facilities around the district, including Putnam County.  The County Executive and her team are on the situation and we expect that it’s going to be remedied very quickly and we expect to be operational tomorrow.  All essential operations have alternative sites for the day using the County Office building and Historic Courthouse”.

As the temperatures continued to hover well below freezing, the County Executive convened the Incident Response Team in the Courthouse to evaluate the current situation and formulate a response plan.  “The situation today is that we have closed the building while we are assessing the sprinkler system” said County Executive Odell.  “We have to maintain safety as our first priority and because the fire suppression system is off line we don’t feel that occupancy at this time would be in the best interest of the safety and welfare of the employees and of course the visitors to our building.  After we have evaluated the assessment we will make a determination on what the next step will be, whether it is reopening the building or reallocating court operations and personnel to other county facilities”.