MEMMORIALDAYEVENTSAROUNDPUTNAMx

Memorial Day Events & Festivities Around Putnam County

Friday , Saturday , Sunday, May 27,28,29, 2016

Putnam County Joint Veterans Council-
John Morris Memorial Watchfire Vigil, each night
6 PM-6AM May 27,28,29 Opening Ceremony Friday the 27th at 7:00 PM
Flag Retirement through out the Vigil.

Sunday May 29, 20156

VFW Post 1374 & Auxiliary, Carmel & American Legion Post 270-
9:00 AM Ceremony at monument on Terryhill Road, Kent
11:30 AM Ceremony at Post Home 32 Gleneida Ave, Carmel
Refreshments to follow 11:30 Ceremony

Monday May 30, 2016:

VFW Post 391, Putnam Valley-
11:00 AM Ceremony Putnam Valley Town Hall
12:00 Ceremony Lake Peekskill Monument (Chester Place)
1:00 PM Ceremony Post Home 153 Oscawanna Lake Road
Refreshments to follow 1:00 PM ceremony at Post Home
2:00PM Start of “Round of Honor”. Visiting grave sites, cemeteries, and monuments in vicinity, including Lakeland High School, Bill Mangero Park

VFW Post 672, Brewster-
Parade from Brewster Fire House to Electrozone Field
(step off 11:00 AM)
Ceremony at Electrozone Field following parade.
Light Lunch to follow at post home on Peaceable Hill Road
VFW Post 2362 and American Legion Post 275 Cold Spring-
Village Hall at 85 Main Street for a Ceremony.

VFW Post & Ladies Auxiliary 5491 Mahopac & American Legion Post 1080-
Parade from Clarke Place to Veterans Memorial Park on East Lake Blvd. (step off 10:00 AM)
Ceremony to follow at Monument
American Legion Post 1080 Ceremony at noon following VFW
Ceremony at 333 Buckshollow Road
Ceremony and Refreshments to follow at VFW Post home
154 East Lake Blvd

VFW Post 9257& Ladies Auxiliary & AMVET Post 1111
Putnam Lake-
Parade from Castle Restaurant to Veterans Monument on Haviland Road (step off 10:00 AM)
Ceremony to follow parade at monument
Refreshments to follow at Post Home at 4 Fairfield Drive

VFW Post 8013, Somers-
Annual Memorial Day Parade and Remembrance Ceremony. Step off 10:00 AM from Somers Middle School to Ivandell Cem-etery.
( Somers has been added to the list of Memorial Day events because the Somers VFW has recently joined Putnam County Council VFW)
American Legion Post 1542, Patterson-
10:00 AM walk from Post home to monument on Rt. 311 for ceremony
Refreshments to follow at Post Home.

Saturday day May 30, 2015:

Putnam County Joint Veterans Council-
Sunrise Memorial Day Prayer Service at close of Vigil.

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GEORGE D’ALESSANDRO and GLORIA TROY Named “OUTSTANDING VOLUNTEERS” Among Putnam’s Senior Citizens

GEORGE D'ALESSANDRO

GEORGE D’ALESSANDRO

GLORIA TROY

GLORIA TROY

 


George D’Alessandro of Carmel and Gloria Troy of Mahopac are the County’s 2016 Outstanding Volunteers, according to County Executive MaryEllen Odell.  Both Mr. D’Alessandro and Ms. Troy were recognized by the County Executive and Director of Office for Senior Resources, Patricia Sheehy, at the R.S.V.P. Luncheon held on May 6, 2016 at the Putnam County Golf Course.  Then each were accompanied to ceremonies in Albany by the Director of Senior Resources, Patricia Sheehy, where they were recognized by the State Office for the Aging Acting Director, Greg Olsen, for the value to their communities at the Senior of the Year Recognition Event held on May 10, 2016 at the The Egg, in the Hart Pavilion located in Albany, New York.

“Both Mr. D’Alessandro and Ms. Troy demonstrate on a daily basis how Putnam County Senior Citizens enrich the lives of others when they volunteer their time and skills,” declares Director Sheehy.

George D’Alessandro is an enthusiastic man who spreads his positive attitude everywhere he volunteers.  Since 2012, George has been a Senior Fitness Instructor for Putnam County Seniors volunteering his time several days a week at the Carmel and Mahopac Senior Friendship centers.  As a Senior Fitness Volunteer Instructor, George helps many people improve themselves physically and has shown seniors that fitness can be fun.  His classes are always full and the seniors feel that he makes a big difference in their lives.  George has been volunteering his time since the 1950’s showing his commitment to making a difference in the lives of others.  Through the years, he has been a coach for many baseball and basketball teams.   George founded the Kent Day Camp and started many children’s programs such as the  gymnastic program, a kickball league, little league baseball, a softball league and flag football.  Beginning in the 1980’s and continuing until just a few years ago, George started and ran after school intramural sports programs for parochial schools and was a faculty consultant for the school newspaper.  George continues to write a sports column for local newspapers.

Gloria Troy has volunteered and served for many volunteer efforts.  Gloria has volunteered for many organizations.  Presently she volunteers at the William Koehler Senior Center in Mahopacand is the Activity Leader for the RSVP Sewing Group, a group that sews cancer pads for patients.  She also heads up the knitting group that knits baby hats and shawls for wheelchair patients.  At the center, she calls BINGO keeping the game lively for the seniors.   Gloria volunteers her time at the Mahopac Library continuing her knitting for babies and wheelchair patients.  As an RSVP Wellness Ambassador, she visits nursing homes. Gloria has been a bell ringer to help raise funds for the Salvation Army.  As well, she has volunteered her time at the Eagle Eye II Thrift Store cataloging and selling items to raise funds for the Putnam Hospital.  Gloria has walked the RSVP Golden Mile to raise funds for the March of Dimes.  Gloria is also very compassionate towards her neighbors and keeps an eye out for them.  People say that Gloria is a person who works selflessly to help her community.

We congratulate these two outstanding Seniors for the invaluable contributions to our community of Putnam County.

You talk we listen-png

Take the survey. Tell us what you think about community strengths, and health-related issues and concerns.

Take the survey. Tell us what you think about community strengths, and health-related issues and concerns.

The Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP) is being updated by the Putnam County Department of Health, Putnam Hospital Center and other public health system partners. The input of residents and those who work in Putnam is also important to this process.

Your responses to the survey, along with other community assessments, will help create a strong Community Health Improvement Plan.

keepputnamfarming

PUTNAM COUNTY’S AGRICULTURAL & FARMLAND PROTECTION BOARD RELEASES NEW “KEEP PUTNAM FARMING” REPORT

PUTNAM COUNTY’S AGRICULTURAL & FARMLAND PROTECTION BOARD
RELEASES NEW “KEEP PUTNAM FARMING” REPORT

Original Research Includes Current Data on Farmers, Farmland and Local Community
Access to Farm Products; Recommendations Identify Opportunities for a Vibrant and
Diverse Agricultural Sector in Putnam County

Cold Spring, New York – May 9, 2016 – Founded in 1997, the Putnam County Agricultural and
Farmland Protection Board advises the County Legislature on actions that impact farms located in
the County’s Agricultural District. As such, a need for updated, “real time” data on the current state
of Putnam County’s agricultural landscape was identified by the Board as a way to inform the
County and local municipalities on opportunities, challenges and strategies to cultivate and
embolden its food and farming sector. Following two years of convenings and surveys, the Board is
releasing this research in its new Keep Putnam Farming report.
Based on Glynwood’s Keep Farming protocol, a community-based research method used in areas
throughout the Hudson Valley and beyond, the Keep Putnam Farming process began in earnest in
April 2014 with a Farmer Forum, a gathering to inform local farmers about the program, provide
them an opportunity to meet one another, and offer a venue in which to share their concerns.
Farmers reported that, prior to this meeting they had never met as a group with one another.
Glynwood’s role as an advisor and participant continued throughout the survey, data-gathering
and reporting process.
“There is a renewed energy regarding farming and accessing locally grown fresh healthy food,”
said MaryEllen Odell, County Executive. “Through the Keep Putnam Farming program and the
new Tilly Foster Farm Educational Institute we expect to bring state of the art training
opportunities to our local farmers, residents, and students as well as showcase Putnam County
farm products.”
In May 2014, letters were sent to Town Supervisors announcing the official launch of the project in
Putnam County. After informing farmers and community members about Keep Putnam Farming,
the next step was to begin the data collection phase of the program. By gathering current data
using surveys and interviews we are then able to enhance knowledge of local farming and
improving market connections.
“Through the efforts to Keep Putnam Farming Initiative we have identified active farms in
Putnam County so that we can work on strengthening the economic viability of our farms by
enhancing the awareness of all our local agricultural products and services for all our residents,”
said Lauri Taylor, District Manager, Putnam County Soil & Water Conservation. “Through the
new Hudson Valley Farmlink Network we can work on matching new farmers with existing
agricultural land. Putnam County plans to be at the table for the farm to table experience – do
you?” Ms. Taylor provided technical and outreach assistance on the Keep Putnam Farming
process.

Research (Excerpts)
Thirty-eight farms participated in the Keep Putnam Farming research process. Data and insights
into current farming activities were gleaned from surveys that described existing conditions,
challenges and opportunities for farming in Putnam County. The findings have been used as the
basis for recommended actions, including:
● Formalize the Putnam County Farmers Network
● Training, education and technical assistance programs for farmers
● Solutions to existing needs for processing service in Putnam County
● Increase and diversify market opportunities for Putnam County farms
● Update the Putnam County Agriculture and Farmland Protection Program

Four different agricultural sectors were covered by the survey process: Food, Food and Equine,
Equine and Nursery, and a demographic profile of respondents is included. Extensive results are
provided in the full report, but some highlights include:

Local Farmers:
● Almost one-third of the farmers who responded indicated they have been in the County for
10 years or less. Most are farmers growing food products and looking to build their business
and take advantage of the increased demand for local products;
● 58% of respondents own 20 acres of working farmland or less;
● Several equine farmers report that they are diversifying their farm operations to include
other types of livestock, vegetable and fruit production;
● 50% of respondents indicated they provide agritourism activities on their farms;
● Importantly, 83% of respondents were over the age of 50 years, with 63% of these farmers
over the age of 60 – suggesting that farmland succession is a pressing issue for this group of
farmers. Over 40% of farmers also indicated that the types of assistance they had the
greatest interest in receiving relate to farmland preservation and succession planning.

Local Residents:
To better understand the degree to which local food is purchased and consumed in Putnam
County, surveys were conducted with Putnam residents and food service providers:
● 75% of respondents indicated they look to see where their food is grown when grocery
shopping. However, they most frequently shop at large supermarkets and only 11%
participate in CSA (Community Supported Agriculture.)

Institutions & Restaurants:
Seventy-two restaurant owners and chefs completed surveys at the annual Food Operators
Seminar conducted by the Putnam Board of Health in March 2015. These food businesses
represent a large potential market for local products.
● While only two of the restaurant owners indicated that their establishment has a policy for
purchasing local products, all indicated that they would like to purchase local food from
Putnam farms. The two items they are most interested in purchasing are vegetables and
eggs. They would also like greater access to local meat and poultry.
The full report is available online at putnamcountyny.com/keepputnamfarming.

About Putnam County Soil and Water Conservation District:
Established in 1967, the Putnam County Soil and Water Conservation District provides technical
assistance and programs to residents, landowners and units of government on the conservation,
wise use, and development of soil, water, and related resources. The District is a resource
management agency, coordinating and implementing resource and environmental programs at the
local level in cooperation with federal and state agencies. For more information visit:
www.putnamcountyny.com/keepputnamgreen.

About Putnam County Agricultural and Farmland Protection Board:
Putnam County’s Agricultural and Farmland Protection Board was formed in 1997 to advise the
County Legislature on actions that impact farms located in the Putnam County Agricultural
District and develop plans and programs to assist farmers throughout Putnam County. For more
information visit: www.putnamcountyny.com/keepputnamfarming.

About Glynwood:
Glynwood’s mission is to ensure the Hudson Valley is a region defined by food, where farming
thrives. The organization works to advance regenerative agriculture that benefits the natural
environment, energizes local economies, enhances human health and strengthens rural
communities. The agricultural nonprofit’s Keep Farming program is a community-based initiative
that engages a diverse set of stakeholders in gathering and analyzing data about the current state of
agriculture in order to better understand current conditions and challenges faced by local farmers.

CLICK HERE TO SEE REPORT

# # #

Contact info:
Lauri Taylor
Putnam County Soil & Water Conservation
(845) 878-3480 ext. 48104
lauri.taylor@putnamcountyny.gov

lifeiswhyamericanheartassociation

Thank you for making this year’s Heart Walk amazing!

Our County Executive MaryEllen Odell revived a very nice Thank You message from Dawn Dorien – Chair, 2016 Putnam Heart Walk Executive Committee 

Hi MaryEllen,

You did it!

This year’s Putnam Heart Walk was our best ever — thanks to you. Thousands of passionate, caring people came together to send a message: We want healthier lives, free of heart diseases and stroke, and we’re walking to make it happen! You gave the best gift one can ever give — life.  From the bottom of our hearts, “Thank you!” We’re still wrapping things up, so don’t forget to get every donation in online or at our office to count toward your final total.Log into your HQ and make your last call for donations now, and don’t forget to thank supporters and share your Heart Walk story and photos. MaryEllen, I’m going to remember this day for long time. I loved the spirit and energy. I hope you did, too, and that you keep this cause close to your heart. 

We’re on our way to a healthier future, thanks to you. With gratitude,

Dawn Dorien
Chair, 2016 Putnam Heart Walk Executive Committee

P.S. Look out for our next email that will include preliminary totals from the Heart Walk. We can’t wait to share. Can’t wait either? Visit our website and check out where we are right now.

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Spring has sprung! That means some of Putnam County’s best attractions are about to re-open after a long winter

Spring has sprung! That means some of Putnam County’s best attractions are about to re-open after a long winter

Boscobel : April 1st Wednesdays-Mondays 9:30am- 5pm

Boscobel is one of Putnam’s top destinations that is about to open for the season. Visitors can tour the Boscobel House built in the 1800’s, walk through the blooming gardens and grounds, and see spectacular views of the Hudson River and Constitution Marsh.

Chuang Yen Monastery : April 1st 9am-5pm

Chuang Yen Monastery is home to the largest Buddha statue in the Western hemisphere and is one of the most unique attractions in Putnam. As of April 1, visitors will also have access to the Thousand Lotus Terrace, Seven Jewel Lakes, and expansive grounds.

Stonecrop Gardens : April 1st  Mondays-Saturdays select Sundays 10 am-5pm

Stonecrop Gardens in Cold Spring has become a treasured destination among garden visitors and horticultural enthusiasts. After April 1, visit the garden display that includes a diverse collection of plants and gardens spanning 12 acres of well manicured property. Stonecrop also includes a Conservatory, a display Alpine House and the Pit House, with an extensive collection of over fifty plant families.

Visit Putnam County Tourism for more information!

16 Final Group photo

The Putnam County Youth Bureau celebrated the 31st Annual Youth Awards

The Putnam County Youth Bureau celebrated the 31st Annual Youth Award Dinner held on Friday, April 15, 2016 at the Putnam County Golf Club. There were over 80 youth nominated for this award and the Youth Board selected 17 youth to receive the award for their outstanding volunteer service in Putnam County.  Also, honored at the dinner were Cliff & Judy Fitzgerald and Sue Stone as the Adult Award winners.

MEO pinwheels

April Is Child Abuse Prevention Awareness Month

April Is Child Abuse Prevention Awareness Month

Brewster, NY – April 11, 2016 – Every kid deserves a great childhood that’s carefree and full of promise. The Child Advocacy Center and Prevent Child Abuse New York “Pinwheels for Prevention” campaign are using pinwheels to plant that message in Putnam County with the help of County Executive MaryEllen Odell. “Pinwheels are a happy and uplifting token of childhood. They are meant to convey that every child deserves the chance to be raised in a healthy, safe and nurturing environment,” said Odell. “Putnam County is a great place to raise a family. Join us as we plant a pinwheel garden to show that our community supports children.”

The Pinwheel Garden will be planted on Friday, April 15th from 1-4 p.m. in front of the Sybil Ludington Statue at Lake Gleneida on Route 6 in Carmel.
“The CAC has long advocated that education is imperative to preventing child abuse and continues to partner with local agencies to implement innovative programs to ensure the physical, mental, and emotional health and wellbeing of the children of Putnam County,” said CAC Program Coordinator Marla Behler. “As more prevention education programs become available, it is clear that people understand the importance of early and comprehensive prevention of abuse, not just responding to it after it occurs.”
According to Prevent Child Abuse America, research documents pervasive and long-lasting effects of child abuse and neglect on children, their families and society as a whole. Effective child abuse prevention programs ensure the health of children and families, allowing children to grow into adults who prosper and contribute to society.

The “Pinwheels for Prevention” campaign is based on the belief that communities must be more proactive to prevent abuse. It’s not enough to simply respond to cases of abuse through prosecution and intervention—programs and policies that focus on child development, engage communities and create conditions that give parents the supports they need to succeed are essential. These programs and policies include strategies such as home visiting, parent education, mutual self-help support, mental health treatment and substance abuse treatment.
Among the tips provided by Prevent Child Abuse New York are acknowledging that parenting is a tough job. Reassure a parent coping with a difficult situation in public. Help amuse a restless child. Bea a good neighbor and get to know the families in your neighborhood and point out the special things they do for their children. For your own kids, be patient and really listen when they speak to you, and make it a priority to spend time with them, undistracted by work and the other demands on your time.
For more information on child abuse prevention programs call the Child Advocacy Center of Putnam County at (845) 808-1400 or Prevent Child Abuse New York at 1-800-CHILDREN.

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PUTNAM COUNTY WELCOMES NEWEST CITIZENS – 41 NEW CITIZENS AT NATURALIZATION CEREMONY APRIL 2016

2016 Donate for Life picture for release

PUTNAM COUNTY CLERK MICHAEL BARTOLOTTI AND COUNTY EXECUTIVE MARYELLEN ODELL BOOST ORGAN DONATION

PUTNAM COUNTY CLERK MICHAEL BARTOLOTTI AND COUNTY EXECUTIVE MARYELLEN ODELL BOOST ORGAN DONATION

Putnam County Clerk Michael C. Bartolotti and County Executive MaryEllen Odell will be partnering with the New York Alliance for Donation (NYAD) to promote organ, eye and tissue donation in Putnam County.  This program is responsible for saving and improving the lives of thousands of New Yorkers in dire need of transplants.

“April is National Donate Life month, and we are delighted to continue working with NYAD on a countywide basis to encourage residents to become an organ or tissue donor.”  Mr. Bartolotti said, “Putnam County is proud to be one of the many counties throughout the state participating in this important program and I am pleased to partner with County Executive Odell in bringing this program to the attention of our residents.”

There are over 19 million New Yorkers; yet only 24% of adults in New York State are registered donors, compared to the national average of more than 50%.  In New York alone, the number of men, women and children waiting for a transplant is over 10,000.  While 33% of Putnam County residents are registered donors, we believe we can do better!

Mr. Bartolotti will be placing brochures and posters in the Putnam County DMV alerting customers of the donor crisis and asking them to enroll on the Life Registry.  Interested customers can also enroll by checking off the organ donor box on any license or non-driver ID card transaction (MV-44).

“21 people die every day due to the lack of available organs.  98% of New Yorkers enroll in the New York State Donate Life Registry through local DMV offices which makes our efforts on this behalf even more important.”  County Executive Odell said, “We can make a significant difference in increasing the numbers of donors through our constant contact with residents, and I am happy to work alongside County Clerk Bartolotti and NYAD to make their goal of a significantly increased registry a reality.”