sign NOsmokingNOvaping

Putnam County Implements “No Smoking, No Vaping” Policy

Putnam County Implements “No Smoking, No Vaping” Policy

BREWSTER, NY—While health officials debate the question of electronic cigarettes nationwide, Putnam County is moving ahead with implementation of a revised County Code, that expands the definition of smoking to include the use of electronic cigarettes. What this means is that where smoking is prohibited in public places, such as a Putnam restaurant, bar, or school, then using electronic cigarettes is also against the law. Last May the Putnam County Legislature voted unanimously to extend the County’s Clean Indoor Air Act legislation to include all vapor-producing devices.

“Protecting Putnam County residents is our highest priority. We are taking the lead here to protect our residents and visitors from the harms of tobacco,” said MaryEllen Odell, County Executive, “and the health department has already begun distributing ‘no-smoking-no-vaping’ signs to area establishments.”

“The vapor from e-cigarettes is not benign,” said Michael Nesheiwat, MD, Putnam County’s Interim Health Commissioner. “It has fewer toxic ingredients than cigarette smoke, but that does not make it safe. Some research has shown that nicotine replacement therapy during pregnancy has adverse effects on the developing fetus, but most of the science so far focuses on the thousands of chemicals in cigarettes, not the nicotine present in both traditional and electronic varieties.”

Primary enforcement of the new code pertaining to vaping, as with cigarettes, is the responsibility of the owner of the establishment. Owners, landlords and other establishment managers

 

 

 

 

are now expected to ask patrons to turn off e-cigarettes in the same way they would ask one to put out a cigarette, pipe or cigar. As with tobacco smoking, the Putnam County Department of Health can be notified to make a complaint.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, www.facebook.com/RunWalkPutnam, www.instagram.com/PutnamHealthNY and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

# # #

zikavirusx

UPDATE: Free Zika Testing Expanded to Include Pregnant Women Travelers Without Symptoms

UPDATE: Free Zika Testing Expanded to Include Pregnant Women Travelers Without Symptoms

BREWSTER, NY—Free advanced testing for Zika virus infection has been expanded by the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH). Now pregnant women without symptoms, who travelled to the areas affected by the Zika virus, can take advantage of this free testing. Previously only pregnant women with symptoms and a travel history to the areas were eligible.

“This expanded testing makes good clinical sense,” said Putnam County’s Interim Health Commissioner, Michael Nesheiwat, MD. “Because symptoms of Zika are usually mild they may go unnoticed. For pregnant women and their developing babies the results could be severe, given the link to microcephaly.”

Testing continues for all others with symptoms who have travelled to the affected areas. The procedure to be tested remains the same: residents should visit their personal healthcare provider who will work with the Putnam County Department of Health (PCDOH) to facilitate the proper testing procedure through the NYSDOH laboratory at Wadsworth Center. Wadsworth is one of only three state laboratories in the country equipped to perform the screening and confirmatory tests of Zika antibodies and other related viruses. The NYSDOH Zika information line is 1-888-364-4723.

This public health emergency continues to evolve. The CDC is now recommending that pregnant women abstain from sex or utilize protection for the duration of their pregnancies, if their male partner has traveled to or lives in an area with active Zika transmission.

Further information on Zika virus is available at http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, www.facebook.com/RunWalkPutnam, www.instagram.com/PutnamHealthNY and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

# # #

zika thumbnail

Travelers with Zika Symptoms Are Eligible for Free Testing; Free Information Hotline Established

Travelers with Zika Symptoms Are Eligible for Free Testing;

Free Information Hotline Established

BREWSTER, NY—Putnam County residents who have traveled to areas where Zika virus infection is ongoing—and who have symptoms—can take advantage of free advanced testing by the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH).

Testing is currently not available through commercial laboratories. Symtomatic residents can visit their personal healthcare provider who will work with the Putnam County Department of Health (PCDOH) to facilitate the proper testing procedure through the NYSDOH laboratory at Wadsworth Center. Wadsworth is one of only three state laboratories in the country equipped to perform the screening and confirmatory tests of Zika antibodies and other related viruses.

“We urge any county resident who has traveled to one of the infected areas and has symptoms of Zika virus infection to visit their doctor promptly,” said County Executive MaryEllen Odell. “A New York State Department of Health Zika virus information line has also been established,” she added. The number is 1-888-364-4723.

“Symptoms of Zika virus infection are usually mild,” explained Putnam County’s Interim Health Commissioner, Michael Nesheiwat, MD. “Fever, rash, joint pain and conjunctivitis, or red eyes, are common ones that usually begin two to seven days after being bitten by an infected mosquito. The bigger problem appears to be a link to microcephaly, a birth defect that results from stunted brain development,so the infection is of utmost concern for pregnant women.” Symptoms can last from several days to one week. Severe infection requiring hospitalization is uncommon and fatalities are rare.

To date local transmission of Zika infection has been identified in at least 14 countries and territories, including Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the Caribbean, and further spread in the region is considered likely. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will update their travel notices accordingly at http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices

All travelers to any of these areas should make prevention the highest priority. Wear long sleeves and pants, and use repellant products registered with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), carefully following the directions. Pregnant women or those trying to become pregnant should consider postponing travel to these regions. The mosquito that carries the Zika virus is an aggressive, daytime biting variety.

Confirmed Zika virus infection cases have been identified in the continental U.S., including New York State. No local transmission by mosquitoes has occurred in this country, but education and surveillance efforts are being enhanced. Prior to 2015, outbreaks of the virus had occurred only in areas of Africa, Southeast Asian and the Pacific Islands. Last May the first confirmed cases were reported in Brazil.

The Zika virus cannot be passed on through casual person-to-person contact. The CDC has confirmed a case in Texas of Zika virus infection through sexual transmission. The situation regarding Zika virus is changing rapidly as new information develops.

Zika virus infection is transmitted by the same Aedes mosquito that carries dengue and chikungunya virus, which made headlines last year. This is a tropical mosquito that has trouble surviving in winter weather. The PCDOH and the NYSDOH plan to monitor mosquitos in the Hudson Valley when the warmer weather returns. Only one lone mosquito of this species has been detected in Putnam County since 1999 when surveillance began. Surveillance will continue, as well as enhanced testing of other species for Zika virus.

Further information on Zika virus is available at http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, www.facebook.com/RunWalkPutnam, www.instagram.com/PutnamHealthNY and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

# # #

For more information:

Frequently Asked Questions about Zika Virus

https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/zika_virus/

 

Travel Notices for Affected Areas

http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices

Michael Nesheiwat MD

Dr. Nesheiwat Named Acting Commissioner of Putnam County Health Department

Michael Nesheiwat MD

CARMEL, N.Y. – County Executive MaryEllen Odell has named Dr. Michael Nesheiwat Acting Commissioner of the Putnam County Health Department.

“Dr. Nesheiwat has been an asset to the Putnam County community for many years,” said Odell. “I am confident that he will do an incredible job overseeing the day-to-day operations of the Health Department while we undergo this transition.”

As a local physician, he has shared many innovative strategies to truly integrate care, striving to eliminate the silos of physical health and behavioral health.

“I am honored to be appointed Acting Health Commissioner of the greatest county in New York, Putnam County,” said Dr. Nesheiwat. “I will work closely with our County Executive’s office, and the outstanding Health Department staff to ensure that our citizens’ health, wellness and safety needs are served well.”

This is the second time Dr. Nesheiwat has assisted the health department through a period of transition in leadership.

“Dr. Nesheiwat has always been there for Putnam County through the many roles he has played,” said former County Executive Paul Eldridge, who is the current Director of Personnel. “In my short stint as County Executive, I tapped Dr. Nesheiwat to serve as our medical consultant when Dr. Amler went to serve as Commissioner for Westchester County, and Dr. Nesheiwat was there for us.  And, so he is again.”  He served as medical consultant until June 2012.

“I have known Dr. Michael Nesheiwat for many years and I am looking forward to working with him,” said Robert Morris, Putnam County Director of Environmental Health Services. “His reputation as a professional is outstanding and he is also a pillar in the Putnam County community. As the Department begins a new chapter under his leadership, I am confident we are in very capable hands.”

In addition to his own well-established family medicine practice, with offices in Brewster and Somers, Dr. Nesheiwat has been a senior attending family practitioner on staff at Putnam Hospital Center (PHC) since 1992. He also currently serves on the on the PHC Board of Directors and has served as chairman of its Department of Medicine for over a decade.

Dr. Nesheiwat received his medical degree in 1985 and completed a medical internship at Brooklyn Hospital. His post-doctoral training included a residency in family practice at St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Yonkers, where he also received training in emergency room trauma medicine.

His passion in caring for our community is evidenced by his active community involvement. He is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons; Shriners; Rotary Club; and the Putnam County Board of Health (a membership which he will be suspending during his tenure as Acting Commissioner of Health).  He also serves as Putnam County Correctional Facility’s medical director and surgeon;  Fraternal Order of Police member; Carmel Fire Department board member; and medical director/consultant to numerous Putnam County Volunteer Fire Departments.

A Carmel resident, Dr. Nesheiwat and his wife of 22 years, Heyam, are the parents of daughter Sara and son Michael.

flu_shot_needle

“Last Chance” Public Flu Vaccination Clinic Scheduled for December 10 at the Putnam County Department of Health

“Last Chance” Public Flu Vaccination Clinic Scheduled for December 10 at the Putnam County Department of Health

Brewster, NY – The influenza season is upon us with flu activity being reported sporadically across the nation. In the United States, flu activity is usually highest between December and February, but cases may linger as late as May. With flu activity starting to increase and family and friends gathering for the holidays, now is a great time to get a flu vaccine to protect yourself and your loved ones. The Putnam County Department of Health (PCDOH) is hosting its final public flu vaccination clinic Thursday, December 10, coinciding with National Influenza Vaccination Week, observed December 6 through December 12. The clinic hours will be 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., at the main health department office at 1 Geneva Road in Brewster. No appointments are necessary. Any Putnam County resident age three years and older is eligible to receive flu vaccine at this clinic. The fee, covering vaccine cost and administration, is $25. There is no fee for those over age 65 or with a Medicare card. High- dose flu vaccine will be available for individuals age 65 and older, which studies have shown appears more effective in fighting flu in seniors.

So far this year more than 3700 flu vaccinations have been given by the PCDOH; 2432 of these were administered in the schools. If you have not yet received your flu shot, it is important to do so as soon as possible since it takes about two weeks after vaccination for the immune system to build the antibodies your body needs in order to provide protection against the flu.

The mission of the Putnam County Department of Health is to improve and protect the health of our community, made up of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our website at www.putnamcountyny.gov or visit our social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth , www.facebook.com/RunWalkPutnam, www.instagram.com/PutnamHealthNY , and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

###

FLUSCHEDULE

teenhealthdayjpg

Putnam County Department of Health Hosts Two Public Events in Recognition of World AIDS Day

Brewster, NY – Tuesday, December 1, is World AIDS Day, a day set aside to increase awareness of the magnitude of the HIV/AIDS epidemic around the world and a time to remember loved ones who have died as a result of AIDS-related illnesses. To commemorate this international observance, the Putnam County Department of Health is offering free rapid HIV testing and counseling on Tuesday, December 1, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 1 Geneva Road, Brewster, NY. HIV results take just 20 minutes and no appointment is necessary.

On Friday, December 4, in collaboration with Westchester Medical Center, a Teen Health Day for individuals ages 13 to 24 will be held at the Carmel Fire Department, 94 Gleneida Avenue, from 9 a.m. to

4 p.m. The Teen Health Day will offer free and confidential services including HIV testing, STD screening,

Hepatitis C testing, pregnancy testing and mental health and substance abuse referrals. Several other community organizations will be participating in the event to provide education and answer questions.

Although new technologies have been developed in the fight against AIDS, such as rapid HIV testing, and new treatments have slowed the progression of HIV to AIDS, the disease remains a major health threat both in the U.S. and worldwide. People with HIV are living longer, healthier, more productive lives, but there is still no vaccine or cure. The only way for an individual to know if he or she has HIV is to be tested.

teenhealthdayjpg“Early diagnosis and prompt, appropriate treatment can make the difference in quality and length of life,” said Allen Beals, M.D., Commissioner of Health, “and it is also the key to protecting others from becoming infected.”

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention in Atlanta estimates that 1.2 million individuals in the United States are living with HIV and one in eight of those infected do not know they are HIV positive. Many adults report not being tested for HIV because they do not see themselves as at risk. Prevention efforts have helped keep the rates of new infections stable in recent years, but the opportunity for infection increases as more people live with the disease. Getting tested is a first step towards prevention.

For more information about HIV or Hepatitis C testing, or disease education and prevention, contact the Health Department at (845) 808-1390.

The mission of the Putnam County Department of Health is to improve and protect the health of our community, made up of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our website at www.putnamcountyny.gov or visit our social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth,www.facebook.com/RunWalkPutnam, www.instagram.com/PutnamHealthNY , and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

Open Ins. Enrollment

Open Enrollment for NYS’s Health Insurance Exchange Opens November 1

Open Enrollment for NYS’s Health Insurance Exchange Opens November 1; New Option Offers Big Cost Savings

BREWSTER, NY—On November 1, 2015, open enrollment for New York State’s official health plan exchange begins, featuring a new option called “The Essential Plan.” This insurance plan costs much less than other health plans, but offers the necessary benefits as the name implies. The Essential Plan is designed to provide quality health insurance to low-income people who don’t qualify for Medicaid or Child Health Plus, which consumers can apply for throughout the year. The Open Enrollment period for the Essential Plan and other health plan exchange options, continues through Sunday, January 31, 2015.

Access to care is an important aspect to a healthy community and the Putnam County Department of Health works with two partner organizations to help potential patients select and enroll in the best insurance plan for them, the Essential Plan or another one. MISN, a not-for-profit agency dedicated to family and community health and wellness, serves the mid-Hudson region, and offers guidance to Putnam residents, free of charge and bias. Fidelis Care NY also offers free guidance to their array of health insurance plans. Both have bilingual representatives available to help in Putnam County. MISN navigators, aptly named since they help steer individuals to the right plan, can be reached at 1-800-453-4666 or by email at navigator@misn.ny.org. A Putnam representative for Fidelis Care can be reached 845-483-1292, extension 25114.

Those who qualify for The Essential Plan may pay $20 a month per person, or nothing at all depending on income. The plan has no deductible, meaning that the plan begins paying for health services right away. Routine doctor exams, screenings, and other preventative services are provided for free. Doctor ordered tests; prescription drugs and hospital visits are also covered.

New York State’s health insurance exchange or marketplace, called “The New York State of Health,” was launched in October 2013 under the Affordable Care Act. It allows New Yorkers to compare health plan options and apply for assistance that could lower the cost of their health insurance. They may also qualify for coverage through Medicaid or Child Health Plus. Anyone who needs health coverage can apply through the exchange.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, www.facebook.com/RunWalkPutnam, www.instagram.com/PutnamHealthNY and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

dispose

Putnam County Medication Take Back Day Scheduled for November

CARMEL, NY— The Putnam Communities That Care Coalition, in collaboration with the Putnam County Health Department and Putnam County Sheriff’s Department, will be holding a Fall Medication Take Back Event at Putnam Hospital Center (PHC).

To help combat this growing threat to our nation’s children, Putnam Hospital Center will host the event on Saturday, Nov. 7. The disposal hours are between 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Please enter through the PHC Cancer Pavilion entrance. Signage will be posted leading to the disposal area. Individuals can dispose of prescription medication, over the counter medication, and pet medication. Syringes will NOT be accepted. Please keep all medications in their original packaging and remove personal patient information.

Why should I participate in Medication Take Back Day?

The answer is pretty simple – it’s safe, good for the environment and can save lives.

By bringing in your expired or unwanted medications to a take back day, you insure that it will be disposed of in a safe manner. Members of the Sheriff’s Department will be present to secure and dispose of the medications according to the law. By doing so, you also insure that there are no “accidental” poisonings/overdoses by leaving unwanted prescriptions in your home.

When you participate in Medication Take Back Day, you don’t have to worry about causing harm to the environment by flushing medications down the toilet or disposing of them in your trash. Medicines that are flushed down the drain or that leach from landfills eventually end up in our waterways. Pharmaceuticals have become a significant water pollutant nationwide.

Prescription drug abuse is the fastest growing drug problem in the United States today. Home medicine cabinets can be now be seen as the “new” drug dealer. Every year, prescription painkillers cause more than 16,000 deaths and 475,000 emergency room visits.

So on Nov. 7, come over to the Putnam Hospital Center and help us make Putnam County a better place to live! For more information, please call Robert Morris of the Putnam County Health Department at (845) 808- 1390 ext. 43166 or Bruce Kelly of the Putnam CTC Coalition at (845) 225-4646.

medicinetakebackday revised2015

PH Summit2015-BigAppleCrunchpix (1)

Public Health Summit V Convenes to Tackle Broadened Priorities

Brewster, NY—More than 85 public health partners from 43 different community agencies convened at Putnam Hospital Center on Tuesday, October 20, for the Fifth Annual Public Health Summit, organized by the Putnam County Department of Health with support from the hospital. Health Commissioner Allen Beals, PHC president James Caldas and Commissioner of the Department of Social Services and Mental Health Michael Piazza, opened the five-hour event, sharing their perspectives on the upcoming challenges as the healthcare marketplace and public health infrastructure shift, regroup and strengthen together.

“Tremendous scientific advances have taken place in medical care over my forty years practicing medicine,” noted Dr. Beals, who practiced as an obstetrician/gynecologist before becoming Health Commissioner in 2012. “Today, 50 percent or more of illnesses have a behavioral component. Now our approaches must be different.”

Preventing chronic diseases and promoting mental health remain top priorities in Putnam. However, given Putnam’s opioid overdose problem—there has been a chilling 233 percent increase in overdose deaths from heroin and opiates from 2011 to 2012 here—this component has been formally incorporated into the mental health priority. In terms of straight numbers, 63 overdose deaths have occurred between 2011 and 2015, according to statistics presented by Kristin McConnell, executive director of the National Council on Alcoholism and other Drug Dependencies (NCAAD)-Putnam, and Doreen Lockwood, project coordinator, Partnership for Success, Putnam’s Coalitions That Care (CTC).

“Promoting mental health and preventing substance abuse are intricately linked,” continues Dr. Beals. “They are part of a cluster of what is called “MEB” disorders—mental, emotional, and behavioral—that affect one in five young people nationally. These include conduct disorders, depression and substance abuse , and about 75 percent of them are first diagnosed between the ages of 14 and 24 years of age.”

Putnam’s top two priorities now mirror exactly those crafted by the New York State Department of Health’s Prevention Agenda 2013-2017. Unlike last year’s summit which was held close on the heels of the U.S. Ebola cases, this year’s event had no distractions. From the first presentation to the last, work was highly focused on strengthening community partnerships to anticipate, strategize and problem solve around the county’s Community Health Improvement Plan, the “CHIP.”

The “Forces of Change” exercise was conducted in the morning session and “breakout” groups were held in the afternoon to allow community partners to split up and focus in on one priority to share ideas, lay groundwork and formalize joint plans.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, www.facebook.com/RunWalkPutnam, www.instagram.com/PutnamHealthNY and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

Print

Lead Screening Tests Help Protect Children

International Lead Poisoning Prevention Week celebrated October 25-31

Brewster, NY—Children exposed to the environmental toxin lead face serious health risks with possible lifelong impact. Most child poisoning cases result from ingesting chips or inhaling dust from lead-based paint common in older homes built before 1978. In Putnam County approximately 30% of homes fall into this category. Preventing this exposure, early identification of children with elevated lead levels and intervention are all crucial efforts. As a result public health law requires blood lead level (BLL) screening for children at age one and then again at two. International Lead Poisoning Prevention Week, celebrated annually each October, helps raise awareness of this serious issue and the appropriate precautions that should be taken.

“Lead poisoning has very serious neurological consequences for young children and these cases are completely preventable,” explains Allen Beals, MD, Commissioner of Health for Putnam County. “Their developing brains are particularly vulnerable and exposure can affect children’s behavior and ability to learn, as well as their growth. The first step is to make sure your child has his or her blood lead levels checked at age one, and again at two. Speak to your healthcare provider or the PCDOH. Armed with the knowledge that testing is mandated by law, parents are in a good position to ensure this is done. We can assist in getting these screenings, or provide a quick test in our office by appointment.”

Young children learning to crawl spend a lot of time on the floor and put things in their mouth. Frequent washing of hands, face, toys, bottles and pacifiers is very important. A foundation of good nutrition and eating foods high in calcium, iron and vitamin C in particular, can limit the impact if lead is ingested or inhaled.

“Lead can also harm babies before they are even born, if the pregnant mother is exposed,” continues Dr. Beals, who had a private practice as an obstetrician/gynecologist for more than 20 years before taking up public service.

Lead dust is often invisible and generated during remodeling or renovation, when old paint is scraped or sanded, but can be present at other times as well, settling on windowsills, floors and toys. Even if surfaces appear to be in good condition, the opening and closing of doors and windows covered with a lead-based paint will generate lead dust. Most children with lead poisoning do not look or feel sick until much later in the course of the illness. Nonetheless, damage may be occurring. The only way to know is to have your child’s

BLL tested.

Lead exposure can occur in other ways as well, and reducing exposure should be routine and a priority for everyone. Tips include:

  • Assume any home built before 1978 contains lead paint. Keep all painted surfaces in good condition. Renters living in homes built before 1978 should ask landlords to safely repair any peeling paint. If the landlord is not responsive, local building inspectors or town clerks may be able to assist.
  • Take the proper precautions before repairing peeling paint or performing home renovations. Pregnant women, babies and children should avoid all peeling and chipped paint. Hiring a certified contractor ensures that proper safety measures are followed. Safe work practices for renovations are key to preventing contamination in a home. Call the Health Department for information on how to paint and repair safely.
  • Avoid cooking, storing or serving food in leaded glass, crystal and pewter and painted china or pottery from Asia, Latin America or the Middle East.
  • Individuals with jobs or hobbies with lead exposure, such as carpentry or hunting, should shower and change clothes and shoes before going home. Potentially contaminated clothes should be washed alone.

A list of children’s products that contain lead is available on the Consumer Product Safety Commission website at www.cpsc.gov or by calling 800-638-2772. For more information on how to prevent childhood lead poisoning, call the Putnam County Department of Health at 845- 808-1390 or visit the New York State Department of Health web site at: www.nyhealth.gov/environmental/lead.

The mission of the Putnam County Department of Health is to improve and protect the health of our community. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our website at www.putnamcountyny.gov; or visit our social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.