mosquitoday2016

July 12 was Mosquito Control Day in Putnam County

July 12 was Mosquito Control Day in Putnam County. Public Health Sanitarian Mike Luke shows Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell, Michael Nesheiwat, MD, Interim Health Commissioner, right, and Eric Gross, left, the mosquito larvae he had collected from a storm drain. One had developed into an adult flying mosquito in the jar in just a few short days. That is why it is so important for residents to dump all standing water.

The health department is deploying mosquito traps around the county and will send samples for testing at the NYS Wadsworth Lab in Albany. Two questions need to be answered: What mosquitos are in Putnam and what diseases, if any, do they carry? The only known transmitter of Zika virus is the the Aedes aegypti and it has never been found in Putnam. The Asian Tiger mosquito, the Aedes albopictus, has only been captured once here back in 2006, but it is still questionable whether or not it can transmit the Zika virus.

County Executive MaryEllen Odell reminds everyone that public support is an important and necessary part of any mosquito control program. Mosquito Control Day is a call to action for residents to dump standing water on their property now—and weekly throughout the summer, especially after a rainfall. Personal protection, in the form of mosquito repellant with DEET, is also highly advised. The event was videotaped. To see a recap of the event go to: https://youtu.be/WeOpf39PCJw

bluegreenalgeputnam

Blue-Green Algae Arrives Early in Putnam County

Blue-Green Algae Arrives Early in Putnam County

BREWSTER, NY— Algal blooms have arrived early in Putnam County lakes this year, due to the recent mild winter. So far this year, at least six beaches have been closed due to harmful growth. Algae can be more than a simple nuisance and may present a serious health hazard. Residents should be cautious when swimming, boating, or even just cooling off in waters with any algae.

“Blue-green algae present special problems,” explains Michael Nesheiwat, MD, Interim Commissioner of Health. “This type is a toxin-producing cyanobacteria, which if swallowed is harmful to humans and animals. At high levels, it can cause nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. It can also cause irritation of the skin, eyes, nose, throat, and respiratory tract.”

Some algae are harmless and in fact are an important part of the food web. However certain types grow quickly and form blooms, which can cover all or portions of a lake. Because it is hard to tell a harmful algal bloom from a harmless one, it is best to avoid swimming, boating or otherwise playing in or drinking water with a bloom.

Robert Morris, PE, MPH, director of environmental health at the Putnam County Department of Health (PCDOH), says, “To be safe residents should avoid contact with any water that has a floating covering or scum on its surface, is discolored or has an unpleasant odor. Blue-green algae can form a thick mat on the water surface resembling paint. It can also range in colors from green, blue, brown, yellow, grey, or even red. It has been a significant problem in Putnam County in recent years, as elsewhere.”

The Putnam County Department of Health (PCDOH) closely monitors permitted bathing beaches, performing periodic checks at regular weekly or biweekly intervals, depending on the situation. The PCDOH also responds to calls from town and village personnel. Town officials must close a beach when there is visible presence of blue-green algae and they work closely with the PCDOH to reopen the beach as soon as the bloom clears. This process was streamlined last year when the PCDOH began expedited, on-site testing at the main office. Previously, samples were sent to an outside lab and results could take three to four days.

While not all algal blooms are hazardous, the PCDOH recommends the following precautions for all of them:

  • Avoid or limit exposure to water when these algal blooms occur. Swimming, water-skiing, wading, playing by the water, etc., may cause accidental swallowing, skin exposure, or inhalation of airborne droplets. Use added caution with open cuts or sores.
  • Do not allow young children or pets to play in water where an algal bloom is present.
  • Wash hands and body thoroughly if any exposure occurs.
  • Do not use any water from lakes with algal blooms for drinking unless treated through a municipal water treatment plant.

 

There are water treatments to reduce the blooms in lakes but prevention is by far the best tactic. Treatments can involve the use of algaecides, but they have the same precautions as any pesticide.  Treatment methods, if any, are strictly a town decision, and application of an algaecide requires approval by the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).  Prevention involves community-wide efforts to reduce fertilizer use, keep septic systems running efficiently and manage storm water.

When the water clears, either naturally or by treatment, water testing must be conducted to ensure resident safety. Toxins can still be present even after the bloom looks like it has passed. Only after a satisfactory result on a water test can town personnel re-open the beach.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.  # # #

mosquitocontrolbanner

July 12 Set as Mosquito Control Day in Putnam;

July 12 Set as Mosquito Control Day in Putnam;

Zika Education Bags Arrive at Town Halls

BREWSTER, NY—Tuesday, July 12, has been designated “Mosquito Control Day” by County Executive MaryEllen Odell and Michael J. Nesheiwat, MD, Interim Commissioner of Health, calling residents to action to dump all standing water on their property. Zika “education bags” are being delivered to local town offices and will be available for pick-up next week. Each bag contains information about mosquito control and Zika virus, and two mosquito “dunks.” These donut-shaped mosquito control products are made from a biological larvicide that kills mosquitoes before they are old enough to bite. A limited number of free bags, which also include a sample DEET wipe, are available for Putnam County residents.

“Public support is an important and necessary part of any mosquito control program,” said County Executive Odell. “Residents should check their yards and dump all standing water that can be removed. If the water cannot be easily emptied, consider using a mosquito dunk. This will help reduce the mosquito population.” County Executive Odell, together with Town supervisors, has been working with the health department to plan and provide the latest guidance about reducing the potential for local spread of the Zika virus in Putnam County.

“Another crucial strategy is to prevent mosquito bites,” said Dr. Neisheiwat. “Apply an EPA- approved insect repellant (such as those containing DEET), and dress in long sleeves and pants which may be unpleasant on hot and humid summer days. Fortunately the mosquito which could prove to be a local carrier of the Zika virus is not currently in Putnam.”

The Zika bags can be picked up at the following town hall locations, during their usual business hours, as long as supplies last:

Carmel, 60 McAlpin Avenue, Mahopac, NY 10541; Phone:  845-628-1500

Kent, 25 Sybil’s Crossing, Kent Lakes, NY 10512; Phone: 845-225-3943

Patterson, 1142 Route 311, Patterson, NY 12563; Phone: 845-878-6500

Philipstown, 238 Main Street, Cold Spring, NY 10516; Phone: 845-265-3329

Putnam Valley, 265 Oscawana Lake Road, Putnam Valley, NY 10579; Phone: 845-526-2121

Southeast, 1360 Route 22, Brewster, NY 10509; Phone: 845-279-2196

 

A limited supply is also available at the Putnam County Department of Health, 1 Geneva Road, Brewster, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

# # #

You talk we listen-png

Health Department and Hospital to Residents: You Talk, We Listen! TAKE OUR SURVEY!

Take the survey. Tell us what you think about community strengths, and health-related issues and concerns.

The Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP) is being updated by the Putnam County Department of Health, Putnam Hospital Center and other public health system partners. The input of residents and those who work in Putnam is also important to this process.

Your responses to the survey, along with other community assessments, will help create a strong Community Health Improvement Plan.

 

Health Department and Hospital to Residents: You Talk, We Listen

BREWSTER, NY— Putnam County residents are being asked to share their thoughts and opinions to make the community a better place to live and work. The Putnam County Department of Health is partnering with Putnam Hospital Center to launch a “community asset survey” to gain insight into what the public thinks are the greatest strengths of the community and where the gaps exist so resources can be directed adequately to develop a healthier community. Already more than 300 residents have expressed their views, but everyone who lives or works in Putnam County is invited to voice their opinions. The quick and anonymous survey is on the homepage of the Putnam County website at www.putnamcountyny.com and will run until July 31. The direct link is: http://tinyurl.com/Community-Asset-Survey.

“This is a chance to let us know where you think improvement efforts should focus,” explained Michael Nesheiwat, MD, Interim Commissioner of Health for the Putnam County. “This survey is an integral step in developing our community health assessment, which looks at an array of socio-economic factors that affect health,” Dr. Nesheiwat continued, “and the results help form the basis for our Community Health Improvement Plan.”

From start to finish, the survey has 13, easy-to-answer questions that can be completed in five to ten minutes. The first asks respondents to choose the county’s greatest strengths from a list that includes broad factors such as low crime, a clean and healthy environment and public transportation. The second presents a similar list, but asks where improvement efforts should focus. The third question concentrates on specific health issues in the county, and the next two questions ask about how the person gets his or her health care. The remaining eight questions collect simple demographic data such as zip code, age and ethnicity.

Putnam County businesses and other organizations that wish to ensure their employees’ opinions are counted can contact the health department at 845-808-1390 or are encouraged to email the survey link directly to their employees.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of Putnam County residents through prevention of illness and injury. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our website at www.putnamcountyny.com; or visit our social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth  and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

Boyd Well Drillers repair

Water Emergency in Mahopac; County Executive and Health Department Step In

Water Emergency in Mahopac; County Executive and Health Department Step In

BREWSTER, NY— A public health emergency was in the making according to Interim Health Commissioner Michael Nesheiwat, MD. On Thursday, with the Chateau Ridge well water system in Mahopac barely functioning and with no hope of immediate repair, County Executive MaryEllen Odell authorized an emergency delivery of 6,000 gallons of water to be delivered to the water storage tanks for Chateau Ridge.

“We have been monitoring the overall situation,” explains Dr. Nesheiwat. “From a water safety perspective, the water quality has been fine. This week all thirteen water districts serviced by Forest Park Water Company had been put on water conservation restrictions until further notice in order to avert a potential major water outage. Up until now, only some districts and their residents have had to contend with water shortages, resulting from the various problems with the water systems.”

“With this health emergency, we needed a short-term and a long-term solution,” said County Executive Odell. “We needed water out there immediately and we got it there in a matter of hours. I have further called upon our law department, and with the assistance of Senator Terrance Murphy, we have reached out to the New York State Public Service Commission to help expedite the sale of Forest Park Water Company that has allowed this unacceptable situation.” The sale to United Water Company is currently slated to take place in September.

On Thursday, one of the two wells at the Chateau Ridge water supply stopped producing water. Forest Park Water Company could not arrange for repair because their payment could not be guaranteed, causing an emergency situation. When the functioning well could not keep up with demand, Mr. Cody Barticciotto, from CEMCO, the current water supply operator put in overtime. According to residents, Mr. Barticciotto spent two nights at the Chateau Ridge pump house trying to maintain the system. Additionally Henry Boyd, of Henry Boyd Well Drillers, has stepped in at the request of the health department, to provide an emergency repair without knowing when payment would be made.

As of early Friday afternoon, workers from Boyd Well Drillers had replaced the well pump and removed one bad section of line of the broken well. Currently this well is producing 60 gallons a minute. As of 3 p.m., both wells are functioning and the system is back on line.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

foodborneillensseswhenindoubtpcdohbk

Summer Activities Increase Risk for Foodborne Illness; PCDOH Advises “When in Doubt, Throw it Out”

Summer Activities Increase Risk for Foodborne Illness;
PCDOH Advises “When in Doubt, Throw it Out”

Brewster, NY – Each year, 1 in 6 people get food poisoning nationwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, meaning approximately 48 million Americans get sick by consuming contaminated foods or beverages, and 3,000 of them die. With warm weather here, more cooking will be done on the grill and more coolers packed for picnics, presenting additional challenges to ensure food safety. Food may be improperly prepped, cooked, stored, or simply left out in the sun too long, creating opportunities for bacteria to grow. In 2012 Putnam County experienced its largest food-related illness outbreak, effecting approximately 150 individuals, due to food being kept at an improper temperature for an extended period of time.

“Residents can protect themselves with thorough cooking and proper refrigeration of perishable foods,” says Interim Health Commissioner Michael Nesheiwat, MD. “Illness-causing microorganisms can be present in a number of foods, so keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold.”

Rules to follow consistently to protect against foodborne illness include:

  • Cook meat to at least 130ºF (for a rare steak), chicken to 165ºF, hamburger to 158 ºF and fish to 140ºF. Do not rely on the color of the meat juices for determining doneness. Instead, check the food’s internal temperature with a stem thermometer in the center.
  • Refrigerators should be set at 40°F or slightly lower to store foods including eggs, milk, meats, chicken, seafood, cooked leftovers, gravies, soups, or products with these ingredients. Discard food if temperature exceeds 40°F for longer than two hours.
  • Fruits, vegetables, juices, and cheeses may be stored above 40°F for a limited time. Check appearance, odor, texture and color before serving or eating.
  • Use a stem thermometer to ensure foods are at the correct temperature when storing, serving, or checking for doneness.
  • If food is to be held longer than two hours before eating, keep hot foods at 140°F or higher, and cold foods at 40°F or lower.
  • To keep foods hot, use a heat source underneath the food, and to keep foods chilled,

have the cooling source/ice packs on top of foods.

  • Refrigerate leftovers immediately after cooling. Use a wide shallow container for faster cooling. Reheat leftovers only once to 165°F or above.
  • Select frozen and refrigerated products last when shopping. Refrigerate or freeze these items immediately on arriving home.
  • Cook from frozen, or defrost in the refrigerator. Never thaw frozen foods at room temperature.
  • If uncertain whether a food item should be eaten, follow this rule: WHEN IN DOUBT, THROW IT OUT.

Kitchen and personal cleanliness is important year-round:

  • Wash hands and under fingernails thoroughly with hot water and soap before preparing food and after handling raw fish, meats and poultry.
  • Wash and sanitize sponges and dishrags in the dishwasher, or sanitize them by heating in the microwave on high for at least one minute.
  • Wash and sanitize any surface that comes in contact with food. To make a sanitizing solution, place a capful of bleach in a gallon of water and use for wiping down food surfaces. Rinse with clean water after sanitizing. Ideally, refrigerators should be cleaned at least once a week.

For more information, call the Putnam County Department of Health’s Food Safety Program at (845) 808-1390.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health; or visit our social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth  and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

Edward Murphy, president of the Putnam Chapter of the National Association of Mental Illness, casts his vote for promoting mental health and preventing substance abuse as the top health priority.  Putnam residents can voice their opinions online at http://tinyurl.com/Community-Asset-Survey

Public Health Summit VI Convenes Record Number of Community Partners; Nearly Three Dozen Community Interventions Highlighted

Public Health Summit VI Convenes Record Number of Community Partners;Nearly Three Dozen Community Interventions Highlighted

Brewster, NY—More than 78 public health partners from 47 different community agencies convened at Putnam Hospital Center (PHC) on Tuesday, June 6, for the Sixth Annual Public Health Summit, organized by the Putnam County Department of Health with support from the hospital. The event serves as an opportunity for community health partners to discuss progress on the Community Health Improvement (CHIP) plan, and to learn of new developments concerning the county’s various health priorities.

Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell praised Putnam’s public health system, saying “The silos are being eliminated. Partnership was one of the things that impressed the Public Health Accreditation Board when the health department received national accreditation earlier this year. It’s wonderful to see the collaboration between the health department, county mental health services, Putnam Hospital Center and all other community agencies—with a common goal of keeping our residents healthy.” PHC president James Caldas, Open Door President and CEO Lindsay Farrell, Commissioner of Social Services and Mental Health Michael Piazza, and Interim Health Commissioner Michael Nesheiwat, MD, were among the other attending public and healthcare leaders.

The format for the half-day event was streamlined from previous summits, with an initial data presentation by Erin Pascaretti, the health department’s epidemiologist, followed by panel presentations and discussions by community partners on current interventions, many of which were evidenced-based programs.

Nearly three dozen community interventions were highlighted by panel presenters who were

convened to tackle the two CHIP priorities—promoting mental health and reducing substance abuse, and preventing chronic diseases. Mental health interventions in place include mental health first aid training; safeTALK, suicide prevention training, CIT (crisis intervention team) training for law enforcement; ASIST (Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training); anti-stigma media campaigns; Text4Teens initiative; Lifelines curriculum in most school districts; and peer-to-peer mental health programs. Substance abuse initiatives were discussed such as the Communities That Care (CTC) Coalitions, whose work brings together multi-sector disciplines including community organizations, schools, and government entities to work on substance abuse prevention strategies. Chronic disease initiatives including work-site wellness programs, school gardens and tobacco prevention and cessation strategies were also discussed.

Preventing chronic diseases, along with promoting mental health and reducing substance abuse, have so far remained the top health priorities in Putnam. With the growing opioid addiction problem in the county, similar to what other communities are experiencing nationwide, Putnam formally incorporated substance abuse prevention into its CHIP last year and Putnam’s priorities now mirror exactly those crafted by the New York State Department of Health’s Prevention Agenda 2013-2017.

Putnam residents and those who work in the county can also participate in the CHIP process, by taking the online community asset survey, accessible through the homepage of the Putnam County website at www.putnamcountyny.com until July 31. The direct link is www.tinyurl.com/Community-Asset-Survey.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

Poster-YearsIconic May 2016 HEP C

Free Hepatitis C Testing at PCDOH on May 19; All Baby Boomers Advised to Have One-Time Test

 Free Hepatitis C Testing at PCDOH on May 19; All Baby Boomers Advised to Have One-Time Test

BREWSTER, NY—The Putnam County Department of Health (PCDOH) is offering free Hepatitis C testing on National Hepatitis C Testing Day, Thursday, May 19, for all New York State baby boomers. While anyone can get “Hep C,” baby boomers born from 1945 through 1965 are five times more likely to have the virus. Testing starts at 10 a.m. and runs until 5 p.m. at the main health department office at 1 Geneva Road in Brewster. No appointment is necessary.

“Health officials encourage everyone in this age category to take this one-time test, regardless of any specific risk,” says County Executive MaryEllen Odell.

“The reason baby boomers have high rates of Hep C is not completely understood,” explains Interim Health Commissioner, Michael Nesheiwat, M.D., “but the fact is that 75 percent of infected adults were born in these years. Most are believed to have been infected in the 1970s and 1980s when infection rates were highest. The danger with this infection is that you can live with it for decades without feeling sick, but long-term it can cause liver failure, cirrhosis and cancer.”

Hep C is primarily spread through contact with infected blood. Many baby boomers could have gotten infected from contaminated blood and blood products before widespread screening of the blood supply in 1992. Others may have become infected from injecting drugs, even if only once in the past. Many baby boomers however don’t know how or when they were infected.

More than 3 million Americans are living with this viral disease, and 75 percent of them are unaware of their infection. The longer an individual lives with the infection untreated, the more likely they are to develop serious, life-threatening liver disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, viral hepatitis is a leading infectious cause of death in the U.S.

There is no vaccine to prevent Hepatitis C. Getting tested is the best way to know so treatment can be started as soon as possible. For many people, treatment can cure Hepatitis C and prevent liver damage, cirrhosis and liver cancer.

Residents who can’t make the Free Testing Day on May 19, can call the health department at 845-808-1390 for information about other free testing opportunities.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health; or visit our social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth  and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

###

rabiesadputnam

Rabies Concerns Increase as Warmer Temperatures Arrive

Rabies Concerns Increase as Warmer Temperatures Arrive

Brewster, NY— With warmer temperatures and more hours of daylight, people are spending more time outdoors and the potential for contact with wildlife increases. Raccoons, skunks, foxes and bats, as well as feral cats, can carry the rabies virus, which is found in the saliva and nervous tissue of an infected animal. Transmission can occur through an animal bite, or if saliva comes in contact with an open wound, or an individual’s eyes, nose or mouth.

Spring is also the time of year when individuals may come into contact with baby wild animals, believing them to have been abandoned by their mother. Abandonment by the mother is unlikely, and baby animals, while often adorable, may have been exposed to the rabies virus and can pass it through a simple scratch or small bite. Every year well intentioned residents “rescue” wild babies, later becoming concerned about rabies exposure. The babies must be euthanized to determine if rabies exposure occurred. However, wildlife rehabilitators can be called to determine if the babies need to be “rescued.”

To educate children about the risk of rabies, teach them to:

  • Avoid wild animals, including new litters of baby animals in spring. (Everyone should resist the urge to touch or pet a wild animal or unfamiliar pet.)
  • Tell an adult about any contact with a wild animal or unfamiliar pet.
  • Never touch a bat. If a bat is found indoors, call the Health Department immediately.

“While wildlife and feral cats may account for a significant number of required rabies treatments, the number-one reason for treatments in Putnam County remains bats,” states Michael Nesheiwat, M.D., Interim Commissioner of Health.  As the weather warms, bats return to the local area and are more active and likely to get into homes. “A bat found in the home should be captured since testing it for rabies is the only way to avoid unnecessary treatment, a two week series of shots. Since 2014, over 200 bats have been brought to the Putnam County Department of Health for testing, a sign that the capture-the-bat message is getting out,” added Dr. Nesheiwat.

To safely capture a bat, watch the popular demo from the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), available on the Putnam County website at http://www.putnamcountyny.com/how-to-capture-a-bat/ .

The Feral Cat Task Force, initiated by the Putnam County Department of Health, works to reduce the risk of rabies exposure by decreasing the population of feral cats in our community. Since its inception in 2012, this program has captured, neutered, vaccinated and returned 485 cats and adopted or fostered 88 of them in Putnam County. If you are interested in volunteering or making a donation in support of this program, please contact the Health Department at 845-808-1390 ext. 43160.

All animal bites and/or contact with wild animals should be reported promptly to the Department of Health at 845-808-1390. After hours or on weekends/holidays report the incident by calling the Environmental Health Hotline at 845-808-1390 and press “3.” A Health Department representative will promptly return your call. The Health Department will test a wild animal for possible rabies after an incident involving human or pet contact. If a family pet encounters a wild animal, avoid immediate handling of your pet, or use rubber gloves and call the Health Department.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the county’s nearly 100,000 residents through prevention of illness and injury. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health  or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

###

putnamcountylivingwell

LIVING WELL WORKSHOP SERIES TO BEGIN MAY 9

 LIVING WELL WORKSHOP SERIES TO BEGIN MAY 9

 BREWSTER, NY—Putnam County residents can attend a free six-week Living Well workshop series, beginning May 9, at Putnam Hospital Center. Individuals living with or caring for someone with a chronic illness such as diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis, asthma, chronic pain or obesity, will learn ways to manage their health and create “action plans” to get results. The Living Well series is an evidence-based chronic disease self-management program developed at Stanford University. It is led by trained volunteers and proven to help individuals with an ongoing health condition lead healthier, more satisfying lives. Participants learn strategies for gaining control over their condition, connect with others battling similar health issues, and ultimately learn how to accomplish more and feel better.

The workshop series will be held on Mondays from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., from May 9 to June 20, with no class on May 30. The program is free, but registration is required. For further details or to register, contact Sarena Chisick at (845) 279-5711, ext. 2702 or email her at schisick@health-quest.org .

The Living Well program is part of Putnam County’s Community Health Improvement Plan, and is a joint initiative of the Putnam County Department of Health, Putnam Hospital Center, Putnam County Office for Senior Resources, and the Visiting Nurse Association of Hudson Valley.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, www.instagram.com/PutnamHealthNY and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

# # #