Free Rabies Vaccine Clinic Saturday, March 25, 2017

Saturday, March 25, 2017, 2pm – 5 pm
at Animal Hospital of South Putnam
230B Baldwin Place Road,
Mahopac, NY

Bring your pets –
dogs, cats, and
ferrets for a FREE Rabies Vaccination!
Dogs must be leashed. Cats &
ferrets must be in carriers.

Items to Bring:

  • Photo ID as proof of Putnam County residency.
  • Proof of prior rabies vaccination, tags are NOT acceptable. (If you do not have proof of prior rabies vaccination, your pet will receive a one-year rabies vaccination.)

Please call the Putnam County Department of Health for directions and more information at (845) 808-1390 ext. 43127.

Radon Concerns Continue: Risk in Putnam Remains High

Radon Concerns Continue: Risk in Putnam Remains High

NYS Health Department Offers Low Cost Home Test by Mail

BREWSTER, NY— The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) designates January as Radon Action Month, but the risks from exposure to radon continue year round. This colorless, odorless gas is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers in the U.S. For those who smoke, it greatly magnifies the cancer risk.

Radon occurs naturally in the environment, from the radioactive decay of uranium or thorium in the soil and it can seep into homes or ground water. Putnam County has been identified as a “high risk” area by the EPA and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH). In fact, 32 percent of homes in Putnam are estimated to have levels high enough that action should be taken to fix it.

“Radon contributes to the high lung cancer death rate in Putnam County,” says Interim Health Commissioner Michael J. Nesheiwat, MD. “It is not just smoking. The only way to know if you have high radon levels in your home is to test it. New homes can be built using radon-resistant construction. Old homes must be tested and if levels are high, steps can be taken to reduce the risk. The first step is to perform a test.”

The NYSDOH offers radon testing kits for purchase by mail for $11, or they can be bought inexpensively at local home and hardware stores. The state health department test is a short-term test that remains in the home for a few days. The kit is then sealed and mailed in for analysis. The lab fee is included in the original $11 charge and results are usually returned to the homeowner within a few weeks. If elevated levels are found, the problem can be fixed. Costs vary and inexpensive solutions can correct some situations.

For more information about radon, or to order a kit (NYS residents only), visit the New York State Department of Health website or the New York Radon Information website.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

Check Out the Latest Flu Map: Update 2/1/2017

BREWSTER, NY—The health department is tracking Putnam flu cases…The case count is now up to 151, a jump of 45 new cases over the previous week.

For a look at previous flu maps click here:  Flu Map Archives

Health Department Issues Winter Reminder about Carbon Monoxide Safety

Health Department Issues Winter Reminder about Carbon Monoxide Safety

BREWSTER, NY —During the winter months, people seal their windows and turn up their heat. As a result, carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings rise. Each year approximately 500 Americans are killed, and thousands more are injured, due to CO poisoning. In fact, this odorless, colorless, and tasteless gas—sometimes called the “silent killer”— is the leading cause of poison-related deaths in the U.S. Most problems occur in homes and garages as a result of poor ventilation near a fuel-burning device such as a furnace or automobile.

“CO poisoning is completely preventable,” says Interim Health Commissioner Michael Nesheiwat, MD. “With the proper precautions, these injuries like many others can be avoided. Everyone should have a carbon monoxide detector installed in their home and the batteries should be checked periodically. We advise residents to change them in the fall when we set back the clocks. If you haven’t done it yet, now is the time.”

In addition to furnaces and automobiles, CO can come from broken or incorrectly used stoves, portable generators or space heaters, gas ranges, charcoal, firewood and other products.  After snow storms or other events with power outages, the use of generators and portable heaters goes up, along with the potential for danger. However, faulty home heating systems, both gas- and oil-burning furnaces, are more often the cause. In these cases, nearly half of the victims are asleep at the time of poisoning.

CO detectors are an inexpensive solution to a potentially deadly problem. They are available at home and hardware stores everywhere and not difficult to install. CO detectors come with manufacturers’ instructions about placement, usage and maintenance. For maximum protection, installing alarms on each level of your home is advised, with at least one near the sleeping area. Even residents with “all electric homes,” often use CO-emitting devices such as generators, automobiles, gas dryers and fireplaces. CO alarms should be tested monthly and batteries typically should be changed twice a year.

The number-two prevention tip is to have your furnace serviced regularly by a professional. The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recommends annual inspections and local gas and utility companies usually have similar recommendations.

Other important prevention tips include:

  1. Never use a gas range or oven for warmth.
  2. Never start up or run a snow blower, or other gasoline-powered engine (snow blowers, mowers, weed trimmers, chain saws, etc.) in an enclosed space.
  3. Never use a fireplace or stove unless it is properly installed and vented.
  4. Never operate an unvented fuel burning appliance, such as a gas or kerosene heater, in any room where people are sleeping.
  5. Never run generators indoors, including in garages, basements or porches. Generators should be placed at least 20 feet from a home. (This distance is usually adequate to prevent CO from entering a home.)
  6. Never use a charcoal or barbeque grill inside your home or garage.
  7. Never run a car or motorcycle inside a garage attached to a house or in a detached garage with the garage door shut. Open the door to remove CO and other toxic exhaust gases.

Initial symptoms of CO poisoning are flu-like and may include dizziness, shortness of breath, sleepiness, weakness, nausea and headache. If the early signs are ignored, a person could lose consciousness and be unable to escape danger. If you suspect CO is leaking in your home or building, go outside immediately and call 911 from outside.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health; or visit our social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth  and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

For further information, please visit:

New York State Department of Health:  http://www.health.ny.gov/environmental/emergency/weather/carbon_monoxide/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:  http://www.cdc.gov/co/

Putnam County has 7 New Drop Sites!

Putnam County now has 7 drop sites across our beautiful county where residents can drop off unwanted or outdated medication in a safe, confidential way.

Health Department Releases 2016-2018 CHA and CHIP

Health Department Releases 2016-2018 CHA and CHIP

BREWSTER, NY— Five community-wide coalitions and 91 community organizations joined the Putnam County Department of Health in compiling and issuing a joint Community Health Assessment and Community Health Improvement Plan for the years covering 2016 through 2018.

“It is government’s role to protect and improve the lives of its citizens, that’s why improving the health of Putnam residents is so important,” said County Executive MaryEllen Odell. “This challenge, as complex as it is, cannot be accomplished by one agency or organization. It takes a community effort from government agencies and community organizations, working together to achieve this goal.”

Interim Health Commissioner Michael J. Nesheiwat, MD, praised the efforts of the community coalitions, saying, “Our partners have been of tremendous help—both in assessing the community’s health and helping to strategize and develop solutions. Our biggest concerns are promoting mental health, preventing substance abuse and reducing chronic diseases. Creating a safer environment by preventing falls and injuries among the elderly has also been identified as a priority area as well.”

The five community coalitions leading the efforts with the health department are the Mental Health Provider Group, the chronic disease prevention group Live Healthy Putnam Coalition, the Suicide Prevention Task Force, Putnam Hospital Center’s Community Health Needs Committee, and the Communities That Care Coalition, which works to reduce the use of harmful substances by adolescents. For a list of 91 partner organizations and agencies, or to view the report, click here: CHA/CHIP Report.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education.

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3rd Annual Teen Health Day on December 2nd from 9:30 a.m. – 4pm at the Carmel Fire Department

Last Chance Public flu clinic for Fall 2016 Final

The Putnam County Department of Health is offering a public seasonal flu vaccine clinic for Putnam County residents, 18 years of age and older on Tuesday, December 6, 2016, from 2:00pm -6:30pm at the Putnam County Department of Health, 1 Geneva Road, Brewster, NY. Flu is already being diagnosed in Putnam County, so take advantage of this opportunity to protect yourself during

National Influenza Vaccination Week. No appointments are necessary.

Please bring proof of residency (driver’s license) and Medicare card if applicable.

Cost for flu vaccine is $25, though for persons age 65 and older or with a Medicare card, flu vaccine will be free. In order to move people more quickly through the clinic, required vaccine consent forms will be available at www.putnamcountyny.com.

Download the forms, complete them and bring them with you to the clinic. Forms will be available at the clinic if you are unable to download them. For questions call the Putnam County Department of Health at (845) 808-1390.

last-chance-public-flu-clinic-for-fall-2016-final

Cold Spring Site Added to Health Department’s “Caught-in-the-Act” Contest on America Recycles Day

BREWSTER, NY— By popular demand, a third location—FoodTown in Cold Spring—has been added to the Caught-in-the-Act” Contest, commemorating America Recycles Day. From 2 to 4 p.m., on November 22, the recycling coordinator from the health department will be looking again for residents who recycle and rewarding them with a free reusable shopping bag, and social media recognition for their efforts.

Plastic film is everywhere. Store “carry-out” bags are made of it. Beverage cases are shrink-wrapped in it. Newspapers are delivered curbside in it, and unfortunately most is not recycled. The Putnam County Department of Health is trying to change that.

On Tuesday, November 15, the recycling coordinator will be at Acme Supermarket, 149 Route 6 in Mahopac, in the morning from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. Afternoon hours will be DeCicco & Sons, 50 Independent Way in Brewster from 2 to 4 p.m.,

Less than one percent of plastic bags are being recycled, and the health department has been working with stores in the county that are required by law to accept plastic films. All large retail stores, or chains with more than five smaller stores, must participate. Currently there are 25 drop-off locations in Putnam County, including Home Depot, Acme, and Kohl’s in Brewster, and Foodtown in Cold Spring. A complete list is posted online at the PCDOH website.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education.

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Recycling Reaps Rewards: Health Department Holds “Caught-in-the-Act” Contest on America Recycles Day

Recycling Reaps Rewards:

Health Department Holds “Caught-in-the-Act” Contest on America Recycles Day

BREWSTER, NY— Plastic film is everywhere. Store “carry-out” bags are made of it. Beverage cases are shrink-wrapped in it. Newspapers are delivered curbside in it, and unfortunately most is not recycled. The Putnam County Department of Health is trying to change that. On Tuesday, November 15, America Recycles Day, the department is holding a “Caught-in-the-Act” Contest.

From 10 a.m. to 12 noon and then again from 2 to 4 p.m., the recycling coordinator from the health department will be looking for residents who recycle and rewarding them with a free reusable shopping bag, and social media recognition for their efforts. The morning session will take place at Acme Supermarket, 149 Route 6 in Mahopac, and the afternoon hours will be spent at DeCicco & Sons, 50 Independent Way in Brewster.

“We are launching this campaign because most people are unaware you can recycle these plastic film items,” says County Executive MaryEllen Odell. “Curbside recycling does not include them. Instead they must be brought to a drop-off location. But it’s the responsible and civic thing to do—for your family and your community.”

“Less than one percent of plastic bags are being recycled,” continues Interim Health Commissioner Michael J. Nesheiwat, MD. “It may take a bit of extra effort in the beginning, but only until it becomes more routine. And it makes a positive impact on our environment.”

The health department has been working with stores in the county that are required by law

to accept plastic films. All large retail stores, or chains with more than five smaller stores, must participate. Currently there are 25 drop-off locations in Putnam County, including Home Depot, Acme, and Kohl’s in Brewster, and at Foodtown in Cold Spring. A complete list is posted online at the PCDOH website.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education.

recycling-ad-rvsdnov-16