Putnam Replenishes its Fleet with Eight New Buses

In efforts to ensure passenger safety and maximize efficiencies, County Executive MaryEllen Odell announced that Putnam recently added eight new buses to its fleet, allowing older buses to retire.

“Updating our buses allows us to better serve the public,” said Odell. “Newer vehicles are less prone to breakdowns and are better to accommodate the needs of our ridership. They help us to meet our fiscal and social responsibilities to our residents.”

The new buses have led lighting, are more comfortable, less noisy and are more fuel efficient.  In addition, each bus has a wheelchair lift to accommodate persons with disabilities.  The new buses are also better for the environment because they replace inefficient diesel buses.

With the latest additions, the buses traversing the fixed routes are all uniform.

The older buses that will be decommissioned have over 200,000 miles on them.

The buses were deployed on every route in mid-June with a positive response from riders and drivers alike.

Photo Caption: Several of the new buses that have been added to the Putnam County fleet.

9/11 Putnam Heroes Memorial

Putnam County’s annual September 11th Candlelight Vigil will be held on Monday, September 11, 2017 at the Putnam Heroes Memorial located at Spain Cornerstone Park 1 Fair Street Carmel at 8:00 PM

This year the service will also include a dedication of a new memorial to those citizens of Putnam County who have died as a result of their action in the aftermath of the September 11th attacks. Along with the eight Putnam Heroes who died on September 11th, there will be an additional six citizens recognized. They are Firefighter Edward Tietjen of the FDNY and Battalion Chief John Vaughan of the FDNY, both formally of Mahopac. Battalion Chief Thomas Van Doran of the FDNY and Firefighter Glenn Bisogno of the Brewster Fire Department, both formerly of Brewster. Firefighter Thomas Kelly of the FDNY and Firefighter Charles Flickinger of the Lake Carmel Fire Department, both formerly of the Town of Kent.

For those wishing to attend, preceding the Candlelight Vigil there will be a Mass of Remembrance at St. James the Apostle Church, 14 Gleneida Avenue, Carmel at 7:00 PM

Odell names Kenneth W. Clair Jr. acting Emergency Services Commissioner as Sutton retires

Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell has named Kenneth W. Clair Jr. Acting Commissioner of the Bureau of Emergency Services (BOES) after the retirement of the current Commissioner Anthony W. Sutton. The change will be effective Tuesday, Sept. 5.

“Kenneth Clair’s knowledge, experience and passion have made him an asset at the Bureau for decades,” said Odell. “I know that with his capabilities, he will successfully lead the Bureau through this transition.”

Prior to becoming Deputy Commissioner, Clair served in the Bureau a Deputy Fire Coordinator for nine years. In addition, he has served as Assistant Fire Inspector in Southeast from 1997-2003 and more recently as the Emergency Preparedness Officer for the Town of Southeast from 2003-present. He is a New York State Fire Prevention Officer and is National Incident Management certified.

A lifelong Brewster resident, Clair has been a volunteer fire fighter for the Brewster Fire Department for more than 25 years.  He is also a former Brewster Fire Chief, Past President of Putnam County Fire Association, a member of the National Fire Protection Association, New York State Chiefs and Putnam County Chiefs Association and currently serves as a Fire Commissioner in the Brewster-Southeast Joint Fire District.

For his commitment to fire prevention and education, Clair was honored as the New York State Fire Educator of the Year in 2010 and was a recipient of the Michael Neuner Fire Prevention Award.

“I’m excited to lead the Bureau of Emergency Services in Putnam,” Clair said. “I thank County Executive Odell for her confidence in me, and for giving me this tremendous opportunity. I have spent my entire public service career preparing for this role. I pledge to work hard every day to protect the people of Putnam County.”

Odell named Sutton as Emergency Service Commissioner in March 2015, after a selection committee comprised of first responders interviewed the candidates and narrowed down the field to the finalists they thought best fit the position. The legislature approved Sutton as Commissioner in May 2015.

“I appreciate the devotion Commissioner Sutton has shown the Bureau during his tenure and thank him for his service to the people of Putnam County,” said Odell. “His steady hand and calm demeanor helped the county through a difficult period. Under his leadership, the Bureau has enhanced its effectiveness to provide prompt and efficient emergency assistance to residents and visitors of Putnam County. Comm. Sutton restored relationships with the Sheriff’s Department, police departments and all of the first responder organizations.”

For Sutton retirement is bittersweet.

“I’m both excited and saddened to leave my post,” said Sutton. “It has been my distinct pleasure to serve County Executive Odell as commissioner of Emergency Services. She set the bar high, but was there at every turn to support the Bureau and help us face the challenges.”

Sutton thanks the elected officials that made sure he did his homework by asking the hard questions before approving BOES projects, initiatives and budgets. He also grateful to members of the Fire Advisory Board, Emergency Services Advisory Board, Putnam County Fire Chiefs Association, 911 Committee and the other associations, committees and organizations he worked with.

“It has been an honor to work with Putnam’s fire fighters, EMT’s and police officers,” Sutton said. “I am forever indebted to the administration staff, the dispatchers, the Deputy Fire coordinators, special teams and all the other volunteers that I have had the honor to work with during my tenure at the Bureau. They have made my job easier and more enjoyable.”

Chairwoman of the Putnam County Legislature Ginny Nacerino recognized the efforts of Sutton and the ability of Clair.

“We have been very fortunate to have Anthony Sutton serve as our Commissioner of Emergency Services,” Nacerino said. “Tony’s wealth of insight, experience and caliber has vastly improved the department and services during his tenure. I wish him all the best in retirement.”

She added, “I support passing the torch to Ken Clair and have him serve as our Acting Commissioner,” Nacerino said. “As Deputy Commissioner, he has proven to be a proactive and effective leader. I am confident that having him at the helm, he will continue in Tony’s footsteps to raise the bar and work in earnest towards improving and protecting the lives of Putnam County residents.”

Sutton is satisfied knowing the Bureau will be led by Acting Commissioner Clair and Deputy Commissioner Robert Lipton.

“They have my total confidence and make it comfortable for me to hand off the baton of leadership,” Sutton said. “I will truly miss the entire Putnam “Team” and will always remember my time here fondly.”

Photo Caption: Acting Commissioner of the Bureau of Emergency Services Ken Clair

Tilly’s Table is Ready for your Reservation

Tilly’s Table is Ready for your Reservation

Tilly’s Table is taking your dinner reservations now, for dinner seating that will begin Friday, Sept, 8. The restaurant, located in the lodge on the county-owned Tilly Foster Farm in Brewster, will highlight organic and locally sourced ingredients. After the grand opening, Tilly’s Table will continue to be open Friday and Saturday nights for dinner starting at 5 p.m. On Sundays, it will be open from 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Brunch specials will be offered on Sundays from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

“Over the summer the county unveiled its partnership with Homestyle Caterers at Tilly’s Table and the beautiful craftsmanship the county’s highway and facilities department put into the renovation to the lodge so it could be used as an event venue,” County Executive MaryEllen Odell said. “The response has been incredible. Now Homestyle Caterers is ready to officially open its restaurant part of the operations. Patrons can come in any enjoy a delicious dinner or brunch on the farm.”

The menu features organic NY Strip Steak, Alaskan King Salmon, fresh Maine lobster and many more scrumptious cuisines. The side dishes and salads will use organic kale, quinoa, romaine lettuce and potatoes.

To make a reservation or to plan your next event at Tilly’s Table, call 845-808-1840.

Notice of Public Hearing August 23rd Amending Section 2.04 of the Putnam County Charter Entitled “Powers and Duties” of the Legislature, which was adopted by the Putnam County Legislature on August 1, 2017 by Resolution R#171.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held before the County Executive of the County of Putnam at Room 300 of the County Office Building, 40 Gleneida Avenue, Carmel, New York 10512 on the 23rd day of August at 3:30 P.M. and again at 6:30 P.M. concerning:

A LOCAL LAW

Amending Section 2.04 of the Putnam County Charter Entitled “Powers and Duties” of the Legislature, which was adopted by the Putnam County Legislature on August 1, 2017 by Resolution R#171.

 

This Local Law
Amends Section 2.04(r) of the Putnam County Charter by adding the power to appoint, or consent to be appointed, by resolution duly adopted, a mediator or arbitrator in any collective bargaining labor dispute or negotiation involving the County as an employer to the list of powers and duties of the Legislature.

Copies of the Local Law are available at the Office of the Putnam County Legislature, Room 313, 40 Gleneida Avenue, Carmel, New York 10512.

At the aforesaid time and place all persons interested in the subject matter thereof will be heard concerning same. Comments will also be accepted via regular mail submitted to the above referenced address, electronic mail to maryellen.odell@putnamcountyny.gov, and facsimile to (845)808-1901.

This Local Law shall take forty-five (45) days from the date of its passage and is subject to permissive referendum.

AT&T Teams Up with Putnam County Executive, Sheriff and County Clerk to Educate the Public on the Dangers of Smartphone Distracted Driving

AT&T Teams Up with Putnam County Executive, Sheriff and County Clerk to Educate the Public on the Dangers of Smartphone Distracted Driving

 AT&T’s Nationally-touring virtual reality simulator will make a pit-stop in Putnam County to drive home the message of It Can (All) Wait Behind the Wheel on Tuesday, July 25

WHO/WHY:       AT&T* research shows that 7 in 10 people engage in smartphone activities while driving.** It’s no longer safe to assume that people are just texting from behind the wheel. They’re checking email, posting to social media, snapping selfies and even video chatting and playing games like Pokémon Go. To drive home the message, “It Can (All) Wait,” AT&T has teamed up with Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell, Putnam County Sheriff Don Smith, and Putnam County Clerk Mike Bartolotti to bring the AT&T nationally-touring 3D virtual reality simulator to the Putnam County DMV. This educational and free opportunity will allow the public to experience firsthand how dangerous it is to take their eyes off the road and glance at a phone even for just two seconds. The virtual reality simulator “pit stop” in Putnam County is one of 200 nationwide in 2017.

The simulator is also visiting Putnam County to celebrate the remarkable dedication of local AT&T employee Regina Ennis, who won the AT&T’s It Can Wait 16 in ’16 Pledge contest last year, an internal contest challenging employees to compete to get the most It Can Wait pledges from their communities.  Because of her dedication and commitment to protecting her community through educating on dangers of smartphone distracted driving, AT&T scheduled the simulator to make a special stop in her community to help her and the local partnering dignitaries to educate county residents to keep their eyes on the road and not on their phone.

In addition, the It Can Wait 3D virtual reality simulator visit to the Putnam County raises awareness for AAA’s 100 Deadliest Days for Drivers – the period between Memorial Day and Labor Day when teen crash fatalities historically climb. With more young and inexperienced drivers, motorcycles, farm vehicles and bicyclists on the road, as well as pedestrians, it’s a great reminder for teen drivers to put the phone down while driving.

WHEN:                 Tuesday, July 25, 10am – 4:30 pm

***At 10 a.m. there will be a short media briefing and photo opportunity to unveil the simulator to the public with Putnam County Executive Odell, Sheriff Smith, County Clerk Bartolotti and Regina Ennis of AT&T.

WHERE:               Putnam County DMV Parking Lot, Kern Building, 1 Geneva Drive, Brewster NY

WHAT:                 When you’re behind the wheel, everything can change in the blink of an eye. A post, a selfie, a text, a scroll, an email—one look is all it takes. This simulation shows the consequences of glancing at a phone while driving in a 3D fully-immersive experience.

People can also use their own smartphone to view the 360° experience at home.  To learn more, visit ItCanWait.com/VR.

The nationwide virtual reality simulator tour focuses on the dangers of smartphone distractions while driving and the unique virtual reality simulator experience is part of the AT&T It Can Wait campaign, which urges drivers to keep their eyes on the road, not on their phones. The campaign began with a focus on not texting and driving. It has now expanded to the broader dangers of smartphone use behind the wheel.

Since its launch in 2010, the It Can Wait campaign has:

  • Helped grow awareness of the dangers of smartphone distracted driving to nearly 90% of audiences surveyed.
  • Inspired more than 15 million pledges to not drive distracted.
  • Worked with departments of transportation in various states on research that suggests a correlation between IT CAN WAIT campaign activities and a reduction in crashes.
  • Collaborated with AT&T data scientists on research that shows how statewide anti-texting laws impact the rate of texting while driving.

VISUALS:

  • ·         3D virtual reality simulator
  • ·         Opportunity for reporters/videographers/photojournalists to experience simulator
  • ·         Interview opportunities with simulator “drivers,” Putnam County Executive Odell, Sheriff Smith, County Clerk Bartolotti and Ennis of AT&T.
  • ·         It Can Wait sizzle reel

 * AT&T products and services are provided or offered by subsidiaries and affiliates of AT&T Inc. under the AT&T brand and not by AT&T Inc.

 ** Research commissioned by AT&T and conducted by Braun Research. Polled 2,067 people in the U.S. aged 16-65 who use their smartphone and drive at least once a day. Additional information available here.

No Gruff from the New Kids at Tilly Foster

SOUTHEAST, NY – Tilly Foster Farm, which reopened to the public on June 3, 2017, continues to foster the historic farm’s heritage with the addition of Sophie (pictured left) and Juliet (right), two new Nigerian Dwarf goats. The pair, procured from Good Hope Farm in South Salem New York, will join fellow goats, Calvin and Hobbes, who came to Tilly Foster last December.

“We are excited to welcome Sophie and Juliet to the herd,” said Teresa De Angelis, veterinary technician and animal caretaker at Tilly Foster Farm. “The goats are acclimating to their new home and will be available for viewing by the public before the end of July.”

“The public reopening of Tilly Foster Farm makes available 199 acres of beautiful pastoral vistas, a hiking trail, community garden, charming farm animals and Tilly’s Table, a new event-based farm-to-table dining experience,” said Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell. “We are proud of this achievement and delighted to add Sophie and Juliet to our growing farm.”

Part of the revitalization of Tilly Foster Farm has been the return of small farm animals. Visitors can observe a beautiful array of chicken breeds, including Frizzle Cochin Bantams, Silkies, Polish, Red Stars, Barred Rock, Austrolorps, Brahmas and Ameraucanas, which lay blue eggs. The farm features friendly Kunekune pigs, Penelope, Ginger, Lucy and Levi, four Huacaya Alpacas named Honey, Isabella, Sinbad and Raphael, two miniature horses, Sultan and Sunny, and four Nigerian Dwarf goats, Calvin and Hobbes, and new friends, Sophie and Juliet.

Tilly Foster Farm is open to the public seven days a week, except for certain holidays. For more information and to make reservations for Sunday Brunch at Tilly’s Table, visit www.putnamtillyfoster.com or call 845-808-1840.

 

An Intern’s Perspective: The Importance of Balancing Theoretical Learning with Real Life Career Exposure

An Intern’s Perspective: The Importance of Balancing Theoretical Learning with Real Life Career Exposure

Guest Column by Kristen Reilly, Marist College student and Putnam County PILOT Program intern

As a rising junior at Marist College, I can personally attest to the importance of internships, shadowing opportunities, leadership programs, and everything in between.  This summer, I joined the privileged ranks of 44 other students as an intern with Putnam County Government.  As part of the PILOT program, also known as Putnam Invests in Leaders of Tomorrow, we were selected from a pool of 109 applicants to be placed in varying departments within Putnam County.  Established by County Executive Odell in 2013, the program was designed to give students an opportunity to work or intern in local government to gain experience and knowledge for their future careers, and to keep young talent in the county.  Among this year’s list of 109 applicants, 45 students were selected, including seven high school students, 36 college students, and two graduate school students.  The hosting departments ranged from the County Executive’s Office, Legislature, Finance, Sheriff’s Department, District Attorney’s Office, among others.

As a Political Science and History major, I had the distinct honor of working with the County Executive’s Office.  Witnessing the day-to-day management of the county and what an elected official juggles on a daily basis was an invaluable experience.  Far from the stereo-typical intern duties, featuring lackluster filing and “gopher” assignments, my experience was challenging and interesting. I was never left without something to do or learn, and the significance of my workload increased along with my tenure to include communications with constituents, running resolutions down to the Legislative Department, and working on projects to make my coworkers’ jobs easier.

Personally, the PILOT program provided me an outlet to either strengthen my interest in politics or prove to me that this wasn’t my career path. Fortunately, the experience strengthened my passion for politics and government, which has further motivated me to stay the course. I’m happy that the experience has confirmed my inclinations, but even if the opposite had been true, the experience would have been equally, if not more, valuable in exposing me to a career choice that may not have been an ideal fit.  School can’t teach you that.

As my internship with the County Executive’s Office comes to a close, I am not only grateful for the opportunity, I feel indebted to those who gave me the chance to work within my field of interest, in a professional and respected setting. A special thank you to County Executive MaryEllen Odell for creating an internship program, in conjunction with Putnam County Departments, that pushes students like me to pursue a career that both suits their interests, and allows them to grow and develop as an employee and individual.  I look forward to reapplying to the PILOT program in 2018!

Wireless Zone of Brewster and Mahopac Take Part in 5th Annual School Rocks Backpack Giveaway

Two Hundred Backpacks to be Given Away at Brewster and Mahopac Wireless Zone Kids Day Events

PUTNAM COUNTY, NY (July 6, 2017) – Wireless Zone, the nation’s largest wireless retail franchise offering exclusive Verizon products and services, is partnering with The Cellular Connection (TCC) and Culture of Good to donate backpacks full of school supplies to needy children across the United States through the brand’s fifth annual School Rocks Backpack Giveaway. The giveaway, taking place at participating Wireless Zone locations nationwide, is bigger than ever before with more than 235,000 backpacks full of school supplies expected to be delivered in 2017.

“We are excited to bring this back-to-school initiative to Putnam County for the first time,” said Dave Robles, franchise owner, Wireless Zone of Brewster and Mahopac. “After nearly 15 years of servicing the wireless phone needs of the Putnam County community, it feels great to give back in a way that helps families and children who need a little support.  Every kid deserves a new backpack on their first day of school,” added Robles.

More than 1,300 participating Wireless Zone and TCC stores across the U.S. are inviting local families and their children to visit these select locations on Sunday, July 23 between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to pick up a backpack filled with various school supplies, including pencils, paper, a pencil box, folders and glue. One backpack per child present will be given away on a first-come, first-served basis while supplies last.

On July 23rd from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., families in the Putnam County area may visit the participating Wireless Zone stores in Brewster and Mahopac, NY, to collect a backpack for their child. The child must be present to receive the backpack. The stores are located at 111 D Independent Way, Brewster, NY, and 129 Route Six, Mahopac, NY. Each participating Wireless Zone store will donate 100 backpacks. All leftover backpacks will be donated to local schools.

Brewster Wireless Zone Hosts Special Event and Attractions for Kids

In addition to giving away 100 backpacks, the Brewster Wireless Zone store will host a Kids Day at the store location featuring a Fire Truck tour and Fire Prevention presentation, face painting and FREE ice pops. The event was made possible through the generous support of sponsor, Putnam Bright Smile Dentistry.

In 2015, the National Retail Federation predicted the average person with children in grades K-12 would spend $97.74 on school supplies such as notebooks, pencils and backpacks. With more than 16 million children in the U.S. living in poverty, Wireless Zone and TCC are working to alleviate the rising costs of school supplies through this annual program.

Supporters of the School Rocks Backpack Giveaway are encouraged to use the hashtag #cultureofgood on Instagram and Twitter to help spread the word.

ABOUT WIRELESS ZONE

Founded in 1988 as “The Car Phone Store”, the Wireless Zone® system has become the nation’s largest wireless retail franchisor and was ranked the No. 1 franchise in its category by Entrepreneur magazine. All stores are independently owned and operated, exclusively offering Verizon Wireless products and services. The Wireless Zone® system has been honored with Verizon’s “Best Customer Service” award each consecutive year since 2011 and is franchised and operated by Wireless Zone, LLC. For more information, visit www.wirelesszone.com.

ABOUT TCC

Founded in 1991, TCC is the largest Verizon Authorized Retailer in the U.S., operating more than 800 locations in 38 states from coast to coast. The company is guided by its Virtuous Circle of Success—a belief that employees, customers and communities matter equally. TCC’s nationally-recognized Culture of Good movement encourages employees to give back in every community it serves. For media inquiries, contact Mallory Sturgeon at 317.202.2280 XT. 26 or email her at mallory@dittoepr.com. To learn more about TCC or to find a location near you, visit www.TCCRocks.com. For more information about TCC’s parent company Round Room LLC, visit www.RoundRoom.com.

Tilly’s Table Marks Fresh Start at Tilly Foster Farm

BREWSTER, N.Y. –  The opening of the Tilly’s Table, a farm-to-table restaurant and catering venue, at Tilly Foster Farm begins a new chapter at the Putnam County-owned property. ­­ Tilly’s Table, which is the latest public-private partnership for Putnam County, showcases local culinary talents and features ingredients grown in the Hudson Valley. It celebrated its grand opening the weekend of June 2.

“Based on the success we have had at Putnam County Golf Course, having a public-private partnership at Tilly Foster Farm with Homestyle Catering is a fiscally sound decision that allows the county to also be social responsible,” said County Executive MaryEllen Odell. “Chef Sandra Marinelli is working with Chef Christopher Devine, the corporate chef of Ace Endico, both of whom are Putnam residents to develop delicious menus that make Tilly’s Table be a culinary destination in the Hudson Valley.”

Marinelli of Mahopac, who is heading up the restaurant’s kitchen, has been trained at Marymount College, The Institute for Integrative Nutrition and The Natural Gourmet Institute in Manhattan. She carved a niche for herself, nourishing and cooking for others as she does for her family. Her belief in the healing power of food and its ability to nourish not just physically but emotionally is based on the Ayurvedic principles of what you put into your body creates who you are, inside and out.  This holistic approach will be incorporated into all she creates at Tilly’s Table.

Devine, a Brewster resident, attended the Culinary Institute of America in New York, and has over 30 years of experience as a leader and pioneer in the culinary world.  Recently, he has held the role of executive chef and general manager at Trump Tower, where he directed numerous events and catering services for 15 years. During his tenure with the Trump Organization, Devine also opened and operated six restaurant divisions including The Trump Grille, Trump Café, Trump Bar, Trump Store and the Trump Ice Cream Parlor. As an esteemed colleague for the Trump Organization, he recently had the honor of working directly with White House staff to ensure a smooth transition of all culinary services and amenities. Following his respected career with the Trump Organization, Devine is currently the corporate chef and product specialist for Ace Endico, a Brewster-based fine foods distributor.

“I have been driving past the farm watching all the progress the county has made on the property and when they announced that they were opening Tilly’s Table I knew I wanted to be part of it,” said Devine. “Tilly’s Table will be a go-to destination in the Hudson Valley.”

Tilly’s Table opening manifests Putnam County’s vision to turn the deteriorated property into a treasured resource that all the people of Putnam can enjoy.

“Three years ago, we embarked on the journey of making Tilly Foster Farm an economically viable county asset,” said Odell. “After listening long and hard to the public about they wanted to have happen at the farm, we developed the farm’s mission, which is that the farm fosters financial, environmental, social and historical stewardship through a variety of program offerings by means of public-private partnerships.”

Putnam County purchased the 199-acre Tilly Foster Farm in 2002. The county took over management of the property in 2014. Odell and the Putnam County Legislature had the county utilized the strengths and talents within its own workforce to repair, modernize and rebuild the property.

“First, we brought the chicks back, then the pigs and the other animals,” said Odell.  We invested in our infrastructure because we understood that we needed a sound foundation if we were going to reach for the stars. Plus, we formed a partnership with BOCES and now have vocational training now being taught at the farm.”

Odell credits the Putnam County Highway and Facilities Department for most of the physical labor and craftsmanship that has done throughout the farm, especially in the rehabilitation of the lodge.

“Look at the flooring and chimney work in Tilly’s Table,” said Odell. “The creativity and skills of the highway department workers can be seen throughout the venue. It leaves a lasting impression. Generations from now will still talk about the craftsmanship and work that was put into this place.”

Fred Pena, P.E., commissioner of Putnam’s highway and facilities department is proud of his team as well. In addition to making the property achieve code compliance and have general safety and usability, the department had to enhance or replace things associated with the water supply, power supply and septic system.

“We found strength through every obstacle and grew from it,” said Pena. “We strategically outsourced and effectively used our resources to an extremely effective result.”

Legislator Ginny Nacerino, chair of the Putnam County Legislature, believes that the rejuvenation of Tilly Foster Farm is one of the government’s most significant accomplishments since she has been on the Legislature.

“The revitalization of Tilly Foster Farm is a true testament of what can be done when we work together toward a common goal,” said Nacerino. “I know that Tilly Foster farm will prove to be the jewel of Putnam County For generations to come. We affectionately call Tilly Foster Farm the people’s farm because indeed it is.”

Odell agrees.

“The success of Tilly Foster Farm does not belong to one person, but to all the people of Putnam County,” said Odell. “Together, we have been able to revitalize this property and make it a destination for everyone in the Hudson Valley to enjoy.  We have saved this historical icon of Putnam’s farming heritage, while making it an economically viable county asset.”

Tilly Foster Farm is located at 100 Route 312 in Brewster. The farm is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tilly’s Table is open for- Sunday brunch and private events. For reservations or for more information about Tilly’s Table, call 845-808-1840.