Putnam County Welcomes 48 New Citizens the the United States at the 3.14.2018 Naturalization Ceremony in Putnam, N.Y.

Putnam County Clerk Michael C. Bartolotti hosted a Naturalization Ceremony on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 at 10 a.m. at the Putnam County Historic Courthouse, Carmel, New York. Clerk Bartolotti administered the Oath of Allegiance to 48 new citizens from 32 different countries.

The Naturalization Ceremony was opened by the American Legion Post 1080 Color Guard. The Hon. Victor G. Grossman, Justice of the NYS Supreme Court served as the officiating Supreme Court Justice and offered court remarks. The Hon. Robert L. Langley, Jr., Putnam County Sheriff, offered welcoming remarks. District Attorney Robert V. Tendy led the opening prayer. Mr. Art Hanley, Deputy Director of Putnam County Veterans Affairs, led the Pledge of Allegiance. Mr. William Becker, representative from LiveonNY and an organ donor recipient, gave the Keynote Speech. Samantha Altman, a senior at Carmel High School, presented the gathering with beautiful renditions of the “Star Spangled Banner” and God Bless America.”
After the ceremony, a coffee and cake reception was held to welcome our newest citizens.

Any citizen wishing to view photos and video of the ceremony please see below!

Thirty-two (32) Nations

NATION NUMBER OF CASES

  • ALBANIA 2
  • AUSTRALIA 1
  • BELGIUM 1
  • BRAZIL 1
  • CHINA, PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF 2
  • COLOMBIA 1
  • CZECH REPUBLIC 1
  • DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 1
  • ECUADOR 2
  • EL SALVADOR 3
  • GEORGIA 2
  • GERMANY 1
  • GUATEMALA 3
  • INDIA 3
  • IRELAND 1
  • ITALY 1
  • JAMAICA 1
  • JORDAN 1
  • KOSOVO 3
  • MEXICO 1
  • MOROCCO 1
  • NEW ZEALAND 1
  • NICARAGUA 1
  • PANAMA 1
  • PERU 1
  • PHILIPINES 1
  • POLAND 2
  • PORTUGAL 3
  • REPUBLIC OF KOREA 1
  • SLOVAKIA 2
  • TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO 1
  • UNITED KINGDOM 1

TOTAL PERSONS NATURALIZED 48

For further information, call:
Office of the Putnam County Clerk at 845-808-1142 Ext. 49301

PUTNAM COUNTY RANKS AMONG TOP FIVE COUNTIES IN NYS, FOR EIGHTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR

Brewster, NY—The eighth annual County Health Rankings have been released by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. For the eighth consecutive year, Putnam County ranks among the top five counties in New York State. Putnam is fifth in health outcomes based on length and quality of life, and fourth in health factors, the influencers of health. Last year Putnam was also fifth in health outcomes, and second in health factors, from among the 62 counties in the state.

“Putnam County is a great place to live and work. We are fortunate to have a safe, clean environment and this allows us to enjoy a healthy lifestyle and a pattern of good health,” said County Executive MaryEllen Odell. “Our nationally accredited health department partners with other county agencies and community organizations. Together they work diligently to ensure our residents’ health.”

“These rankings are great news,” said Michael Nesheiwat M.D., Interim Commissioner of Health. “For the eighth consecutive year we are demonstrating a higher level of wellbeing by being among the healthiest in the state. The numbers shift from year to year of course, based not just on our own statistics, but as a result of numbers from other New York State health departments. Overall, there are no big surprises. This data reconfirms the health concerns currently on our radar, ones we are targeting for improvement.”

Similar to previous years, one of the identified challenges in the county is a higher rate for excessive alcohol use in Putnam compared to the rest of New York State. The good news is that the rate of alcohol-impaired driving deaths has decreased from 27%, reported last year, to 22% this year. The health department continues to work closely with The Prevention Council of Putnam (formerly the Putnam chapter of the National Council on Alcoholism and other Drug Dependencies) and the Communities That Care (CTC) coalition on this pressing issue.

The second noteworthy health concern, again similar to last year, relates to the continuing rise of sexually transmitted diseases, including the three major ones: gonorrhea, syphilis and chlamydia. This problem is not limited to Putnam or even New York State, but isa concerning nationwide trend. From 2016 to 2017, cases of gonorrhea in Putnam rose 59 percent, from 17 cases to 27. This jump comes on the heels of previous dramatic increases in Putnam of syphilis and chlamydia. Syphilis went from 8 to 18 cases, a dramatic rise of 125 percent from 2015 to 2016; chlamydia numbers have more than quadrupled in the last decade. Left undiagnosed and untreated, these diseases can have serious health consequences including infertility and in rare cases, even death. The PCDOH continues to spearhead prevention and surveillance efforts, including working closely with county physicians to increase routine testing.

For more information on the 2018 County Health Rankings & Roadmaps, visit http://www.countyhealthrankings.org

The mission of the Putnam County Department of Health, nationally accredited by the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB), is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our County website at www.putnamcountyny.com ; or visit our social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth  and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

Odell’s State of the County Address focuses on Debt Reduction Success, Key Capital Improvement Projects and Storm Recovery Efforts

CARMEL, NY – For her seventh State of the County address, which was held at Putnam County Golf Course on Thursday, March 15, Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell proudly proclaimed that the county was moving in the right direction, highlighted by dramatic reductions in county debt obligations, stable tax rates, key infrastructure investments at various points along the Route 6 corridor and with the construction of a new senior center in Cold Spring and the renovation of the Carmel senior center. A large portion of the beginning of the speech was dedicated to county employees, first responders and many volunteers who worked together in the recovery efforts following two major nor’easter storms that wreaked havoc on the Hudson Valley region earlier this month.

“The two-fisted winter storm punches that we received over the last two weeks showed the fierce dedication of our volunteers and first responders,” Odell said. “Highway workers, police, fire, EMS and the many, many, volunteers and public servants that responded ensured that our residents were protected. That’s what we do in Putnam County.  We all pull together during times of adversity.”

Putnam County had its Emergency Command Center open for eight days continuously beginning March 2. By the end of Day 1, Putnam 9-1-1 had received 1,135 calls for assistance and had dispatched 818 police, 150 fire department and 40 EMS calls.

The storms caused more than 25,000 homes and businesses to lose their electricity. Odell thanked the organizations that set up comfort stations, overnight shelters and hot meals for those suffering without power.

She officially declared 2018 the Year of the Volunteer in Putnam County to show her appreciation for the impact on our community that the volunteers have throughout the year and especially stepping up when the Putnam County residents need it most.

When discussing how her administration has kept Putnam County moving in the right direction, Odell noted that in addition to delivering budgets that are under the tax cap, the total debt summary of the county has decreased by $30.4m or 29%, since she took office in 2011. Putnam County also continues to have the lowest tax bill of any of the 62 counties in New York State, while maintaining its Aa2 Moody’s Bond Rating.

“We have been able to do this without major layoffs or tax hikes,” she said. “We found efficiencies and still found ways to invest in our county assets—Putnam County Golf Course and Tilly Foster Farm, so they can be sustainable and be enjoyed by all the residents.”

Looking ahead, Odell spoke about the renovation of the Carmel Senior Center and the building of the new Cold Spring Senior Center. She also mentioned the sewer and wastewater treatment projects in Lake Carmel, Brewster and Mahopac as ways to protect the environment and allow responsible commercial development and protect the residential neighborhoods.

“We continue to move Putnam County in the right direction, with smart growth and key investments all while maintaining a solid financial operation,” said Odell.  “We do this by finding efficiencies and communicating with the Putnam County Legislature and our department heads to provide the highest quality of services at the least expense to the taxpayer. It’s a successful and responsible model that we look to continue in 2018 and beyond to maintain and build upon the great quality of life we all enjoy here in Putnam.”