Putnam County Clerk Michael C. Bartolotti Swears in 32 New Citizens at the Naturalization Ceremony on Wednesday, June 28, 2017 atPutnam County historic courthouse in Carmel, New York

Putnam County Clerk Michael C. Bartolotti hosted a Naturalization Ceremony on Wednesday, June 28, 2017 at 10 a.m. at the Putnam County Historic Courthouse, Carmel, New York.  Clerk Bartolotti administered the Oath of Allegiance to 32 new citizens from 20 different countries.

Prior to the ceremony, the County Clerk’s Office greeted the new citizens and presented them with important information about passports and voter registration.

The Naturalization Ceremony was opened by the American Legion Post 1080 Color Guard.  The Hon. James T. Rooney, Acting Justice of the Supreme Court and Putnam County Court Judge served as the officiating Supreme Court Justice and offered court remarks.  Undersheriff Paul Boscia led the opening prayer.  Mr. Art Hanley, Deputy Director of Putnam County Veterans Affairs led the Pledge of Allegiance.  Mr. William Becker, an organ donor recipient and outspoken champion in the organ donation movement, gave the Keynote Speech.  Samantha Altman, a senior at Carmel High School, presented the gathering with beautiful renditions of the “Star Spangled Banner” and God Bless America.”

After the ceremony, a coffee and cake reception was held to welcome our newest citizens.

Any citizens wishing to view photos and video of the ceremony are encouraged to visit www.putnamcountyny.gov/county-clerk or visit our Facebook page.

 

Twenty (20) Nations

Nation/Number of Cases

  • ALBANIA – 1
  • BRAZIL – 2
  • BULGARIA – 1
  • CANADA – 1
  • COLUMBIA – 2
  • ECUADOR – 2
  • GEORGIA – 1
  • GUATEMALA – 1
  • HONDURAS – 1
  • INDIA – 2
  • ITALY – 4
  • KOSOVO – 1
  • MEXICO – 1
  • NEPAL – 1
  • POLAND  – 3
  • SLOVAKIA – 1
  • SPAIN – 1
  • UKRAINE – 4
  • UNITED KINGDOM – 1
  • URUGUAY – 1

 

  • TOTAL PERSONS NATURALIZED                   32

For further information, call:

Office of the Putnam County Clerk at 845-808-1142 Ext. 49301

Local Cat Tests Positive for Rabies

Brewster, NY- Last Friday, June 23, in the area of Tanager Road and Wright Road in Mahopac, a gray tabby cat tested positive for rabies. The cat was seen earlier in contact with other cats in the area, according to reports to the Putnam County Department of Health (PCDOH). Since rabies can spread through the saliva of an infected animal, other cats may be infected as well. Any person or pet who may have had physical contact with this cat, or other cats or wild animals in the area, should contact the Health Department immediately at 845-808-1390.

“Rabies is a potentially fatal disease, but the only way to get it is through a bite from a sick animal or saliva in an open wound,” interim Commissioner of Health Michael Nesheiwat, M.D., reminds residents. “All animal bites or contact with wild animals should be reported promptly to the Department of Health. To reduce your risk for rabies exposure, it’s best to avoid going near wild or stray animals and keep pets up to date on rabies vaccination.”

Ongoing programs to reduce the chance of spreading rabies include the Putnam County Feral Cat Task Force and the PCDOH- sponsored, free pet vaccination clinics. The next free rabies vaccination clinic will be held Saturday, July 15, at Hubbard Lodge, 2880 Route 9 in Cold Spring, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., and is open to all Putnam County residents. Dogs must be leashed and well-controlled, and cats and ferrets must be in a carrier.

Please bring photo ID as proof of Putnam County residency, as well as written proof of prior rabies vaccination. Tags are not acceptable. If you do not have a written certificate documenting prior rabies vaccination, your pet will receive a one-year rabies vaccine. An animal information/release form will be available and can be completed at the clinic site. For more information and directions, please call the PCDOH at (845) 808-1390 ext. 43127.

The Department of Health’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit our social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth, and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

Free Rabies Clinic Saturday July 15th

Bring your dogs, cats and ferrets to a FREE rabies vaccination clinic on

Saturday, July 15th, from 10am – 12pm. Sponsored by the Putnam County

Department of Health, the clinic is being held at Hubbard Lodge, 2880 Route 9, Cold Spring, NY and is open to all Putnam County residents.

Please bring photo ID as proof of Putnam County residency, as well as proof of prior rabies vaccination. Tags are not acceptable. If you do not have proof of prior rabies vaccination, your pet will receive a one-year rabies vaccine. All dogs must be leashed and cats and ferrets must be in carriers. For more information and directions, please call the Putnam County Department of Health at (845) 808-1390 ext. 43127.

Tilly’s Table Marks Fresh Start at Tilly Foster Farm

BREWSTER, N.Y. –  The opening of the Tilly’s Table, a farm-to-table restaurant and catering venue, at Tilly Foster Farm begins a new chapter at the Putnam County-owned property. ­­ Tilly’s Table, which is the latest public-private partnership for Putnam County, showcases local culinary talents and features ingredients grown in the Hudson Valley. It celebrated its grand opening the weekend of June 2.

“Based on the success we have had at Putnam County Golf Course, having a public-private partnership at Tilly Foster Farm with Homestyle Catering is a fiscally sound decision that allows the county to also be social responsible,” said County Executive MaryEllen Odell. “Chef Sandra Marinelli is working with Chef Christopher Devine, the corporate chef of Ace Endico, both of whom are Putnam residents to develop delicious menus that make Tilly’s Table be a culinary destination in the Hudson Valley.”

Marinelli of Mahopac, who is heading up the restaurant’s kitchen, has been trained at Marymount College, The Institute for Integrative Nutrition and The Natural Gourmet Institute in Manhattan. She carved a niche for herself, nourishing and cooking for others as she does for her family. Her belief in the healing power of food and its ability to nourish not just physically but emotionally is based on the Ayurvedic principles of what you put into your body creates who you are, inside and out.  This holistic approach will be incorporated into all she creates at Tilly’s Table.

Devine, a Brewster resident, attended the Culinary Institute of America in New York, and has over 30 years of experience as a leader and pioneer in the culinary world.  Recently, he has held the role of executive chef and general manager at Trump Tower, where he directed numerous events and catering services for 15 years. During his tenure with the Trump Organization, Devine also opened and operated six restaurant divisions including The Trump Grille, Trump Café, Trump Bar, Trump Store and the Trump Ice Cream Parlor. As an esteemed colleague for the Trump Organization, he recently had the honor of working directly with White House staff to ensure a smooth transition of all culinary services and amenities. Following his respected career with the Trump Organization, Devine is currently the corporate chef and product specialist for Ace Endico, a Brewster-based fine foods distributor.

“I have been driving past the farm watching all the progress the county has made on the property and when they announced that they were opening Tilly’s Table I knew I wanted to be part of it,” said Devine. “Tilly’s Table will be a go-to destination in the Hudson Valley.”

Tilly’s Table opening manifests Putnam County’s vision to turn the deteriorated property into a treasured resource that all the people of Putnam can enjoy.

“Three years ago, we embarked on the journey of making Tilly Foster Farm an economically viable county asset,” said Odell. “After listening long and hard to the public about they wanted to have happen at the farm, we developed the farm’s mission, which is that the farm fosters financial, environmental, social and historical stewardship through a variety of program offerings by means of public-private partnerships.”

Putnam County purchased the 199-acre Tilly Foster Farm in 2002. The county took over management of the property in 2014. Odell and the Putnam County Legislature had the county utilized the strengths and talents within its own workforce to repair, modernize and rebuild the property.

“First, we brought the chicks back, then the pigs and the other animals,” said Odell.  We invested in our infrastructure because we understood that we needed a sound foundation if we were going to reach for the stars. Plus, we formed a partnership with BOCES and now have vocational training now being taught at the farm.”

Odell credits the Putnam County Highway and Facilities Department for most of the physical labor and craftsmanship that has done throughout the farm, especially in the rehabilitation of the lodge.

“Look at the flooring and chimney work in Tilly’s Table,” said Odell. “The creativity and skills of the highway department workers can be seen throughout the venue. It leaves a lasting impression. Generations from now will still talk about the craftsmanship and work that was put into this place.”

Fred Pena, P.E., commissioner of Putnam’s highway and facilities department is proud of his team as well. In addition to making the property achieve code compliance and have general safety and usability, the department had to enhance or replace things associated with the water supply, power supply and septic system.

“We found strength through every obstacle and grew from it,” said Pena. “We strategically outsourced and effectively used our resources to an extremely effective result.”

Legislator Ginny Nacerino, chair of the Putnam County Legislature, believes that the rejuvenation of Tilly Foster Farm is one of the government’s most significant accomplishments since she has been on the Legislature.

“The revitalization of Tilly Foster Farm is a true testament of what can be done when we work together toward a common goal,” said Nacerino. “I know that Tilly Foster farm will prove to be the jewel of Putnam County For generations to come. We affectionately call Tilly Foster Farm the people’s farm because indeed it is.”

Odell agrees.

“The success of Tilly Foster Farm does not belong to one person, but to all the people of Putnam County,” said Odell. “Together, we have been able to revitalize this property and make it a destination for everyone in the Hudson Valley to enjoy.  We have saved this historical icon of Putnam’s farming heritage, while making it an economically viable county asset.”

Tilly Foster Farm is located at 100 Route 312 in Brewster. The farm is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tilly’s Table is open for- Sunday brunch and private events. For reservations or for more information about Tilly’s Table, call 845-808-1840.

 

Row of Honor Stays through July 4th Weekend in Commemoration of Flag Day

CARMEL, N.Y. – Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell announced today that the Row of Honor will stay in place through Independence Day weekend in honor of Flag Day. The United States flag was adopted on June 14th, 1777, by resolution of the Second Continental Congress.

Now in its fourth year, the Row of Honor is an installation of over 200 American flags on Lake Gleneida, which honors the men and women who served, or continue to serve, protect, and defend our freedom. Emblazoned with the names of veterans, law enforcement officers and first responders, The Row of Honor is on display twice a year in observance of Memorial Day and Veterans Day.

“The United States flag is a portrait of our country’s historical past and symbol of freedom around the world,” said Odell. “Continuing to display the Row of Honor through Independence Day appropriately commemorates our history, our freedom and our service men and women who guard our freedom and uphold our democracy.”

PCDOH Offers Free HIV Testing on June 27

BREWSTER, NY—This year annual National HIV Testing Day encourages people of all ages to “Test your way. Do it today.” As in previous years, the main message is to take control of your health and find out if you may have the human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, which over time usually causes AIDS. In early stages a person often feels fine. In fact, approximately one in seven Americans infected do not know they are carrying the virus. In total, nearly 1.1 million people in the U.S. are living with HIV, according to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention in Atlanta.

“With early diagnosis, we can begin treatment sooner,” said Michael Nesheiwat, MD, Putnam County’s Interim Commissioner of Health. “This can make a big difference in the patient’s outcome. It can save lives and can help limit the spread of the virus.”

To encourage HIV testing, the Putnam County Department of Health, in partnership with Westchester Medical Center and Planned Parenthood, will be offering free rapid HIV testing and counseling on Tuesday, June 27. Mobile vans will be located at the Carmel Fire Department, 94 Gleneida Avenue, from 9 a.m. to 12 noon, and at Brewster Towne Plaza, 1620 Route 22 (near Value Village), from 12 noon to 6 p.m. Testing will also be offered at the main health department office, 1 Geneva Road, Brewster, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Privacy and confidentiality are ensured. No appointments are necessary and results are ready in 20 minutes. Free condoms, giveaways and educational information will be available at all sites.

HIV can affect anyone regardless of age, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity or gender. In 2015, 22 percent of all new HIV diagnoses in the U.S. were among youth aged 13 to 24 years of age. People aged 50 and older have many of the same HIV risk factors as younger people, but may be less aware of their risk. In 2014, people aged 50 and older accounted for 17 percent of those living with HIV infection.

Today people with HIV and AIDS are living longer, healthier and more productive lives. New research is promising, but there is still no vaccine or cure for HIV. Safe sex is the best “primary prevention,” but early testing and diagnosis saves lives too. Testing and early results are part of what is called “secondary prevention” in public health terms. Older Americans are more likely than youth to be tested later in the course of their disease. This means delayed treatment, often more health problems and shorter survival. Despite medical advances, HIV/AIDS is still a significant cause of death for some age groups. It was the 8th leading cause of death for those from 25 to 34 years of age in 2014 in the U.S.

For more information about HIV testing or HIV/AIDS education and prevention, contact the Health Department at (845) 808-1390.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the Putnam County community, composed of nearly 100,000 residents. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit the PCDOH website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health or visit the social media sites on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

Help Putnam County Secure Veteran Stories with Vet Scan

Help Putnam County Secure Veteran Stories with Vet Scan – An initiative of the Putnam County Veterans Service Agency, Historian’s Office, and the Southeast Museum

Putnam County Veteran’s and their families are invited to participate in a free digital scanning initiative to secure military memories of the past for future generations.
Local families with military memorabilia are invited to make appointments through the County Historian’s Office to have old letters, documents, photographs and assorted military memorabilia scanned and recorded on a memory device such as a USB or burned to a disk, free of charge.

Qualifying materials include:
▪ Photographs ▪ Slides
▪News clippings ▪ Service Records
▪Commemorative Programs and souvenirs, etc…

Don’t lose your loved one’s story of service, participate in Vet Scan today!
HELP PUTNAM COUNTY SECURE MILITARY STORIES WITH
VET sCAN
An initiative of the Putnam County Veterans Service Agency, Historian’s Office, and the Southeast Museum
Thank you for your service and story.
For more information on Vet Scan, please contact the Putnam County Historian’s Office 845-808-1420
email historian@putnamcountyny.gov

Rally the Troops! Putnam County SITREP Volume 7 Issue 11 Debt of Honor Edition

Rally the Troops!

We need all Veterans and friends of Veterans to call governor Cuomo.   Demand that the New York State Division of Veterans’ Affairs maintain their presence in the Putnam County Veterans Agency Office.  Click here for more information as well as other great articles and more!

7-11 SITREP

Rabies Concerns Rise in Spring

Brewster, NY—Rabies is a deadly disease. When an animal sick with rabies bites a person or another animal, the disease can spread through the animal’s saliva. Without treatment a person infected with the rabies virus will usually not survive. When the warm, spring weather arrives, the chance of infection rises because people spend more time outdoors. Wild baby animals are born and often seen. In New York State, more than half of the rabies cases in wild animals are in raccoons, followed by bats, skunks and foxes. So far this year, three raccoons in Putnam County have been tested and found to have the rabies virus. Domesticated animals, such as cats and dogs, can also become sick with rabies. Regular pet vaccination can protect them.

“A person can become infected with the rabies virus through a bite from a sick animal,” says interim Commissioner of Health Michael Nesheiwat, M.D. “Infection can occur when saliva carrying the virus comes in contact with not only an open wound, but also an individual’s eyes, nose or mouth. That is why approaching a wild or stray animal, no matter how cute, is a bad idea. An animal does not have to look sick to be infected. ”

Every year, well-meaning residents try to help baby animals they think may have been abandoned. Later they become worried that they might get rabies. A better plan is to leave the animal alone, or call a wildlife rehabilitator to see if the animal truly needs assistance. The only way to check for certain if any animal has rabies is to test their brain tissue.

Safety around animals should include teaching children to avoid all wild and stray animals and telling an adult about any contact with an animal, including an unfamiliar pet. Children and adults alike should resist the urge to touch or pet a wild or stray animal, including new litters of baby animals.

“While wildlife and feral cats account for a number of required rabies treatments, the number-one reason for treatments in Putnam County remains bats,” continues Dr. Nesheiwat. Bats are more likely to get into homes and are more active in spring when they return to the local area.

“If you find a bat in your home, capturing it safely is best,” adds Dr. Nesheiwat. “We can test it for rabies and you can avoid the two-week series of shots if it’s not infected.” To safely capture a bat, watch the popular demo from the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), available on the Putnam County website at http://www.putnamcountyny.com/how-to-capture-a-bat/ .

Other programs to reduce the chance of spreading rabies include the PCDOH pet vaccination clinics and the Feral Cat Task Force. Free vaccination clinics are usually held three times a year—in March, July and November. The next event will be held at Hubbard Lodge in Cold Spring on July 15 from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. The Feral Cat Task Force has captured, neutered, vaccinated and returned 622 cats, and adopted or fostered 128 of them in Putnam County since 2012. For people interested in volunteering or making a donation in support of this program, please contact the Health Department at 845-808-1390 ext. 43160.

All animal bites or contact with wild animals should be reported promptly to the Department of Health at 845-808-1390. After hours or on weekends/holidays report the incident by calling the Environmental Health Hotline at 845-808-1390 and press “3.” A Health Department representative will promptly return your call. The Health Department will test a wild animal for possible rabies after an incident involving human or pet contact. If a family pet encounters a wild animal, avoid immediate handling of your pet, or use rubber gloves and call the Health Department.

The Health Department’s mission is to improve and protect the health of the county’s nearly 100,000 residents through prevention of illness and injury. Core services include community health assessment, disease surveillance and control, emergency preparedness, environmental health protection, family health promotion and health education. For more information, please visit our website at www.putnamcountyny.com/health  or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/putnamhealth and Twitter @PutnamHealthNY.

BRIAN R. MORGAN SENTENCED TO FELONY DWI

BRIAN R. MORGAN SENTENCED TO FELONY DWI
CARMEL, NEW YORK – JUNE 2, 2017: Putnam County District Attorney Robert V. Tendy announced today that Brian R. Morgan of Brooklyn, New York, was sentenced by the Honorable Judge James T. Rooney in Putnam County Court to a term of 2 1/3 – 7 years state prison for Felony Driving While Intoxicated. This is the maximum term of imprisonment under New York State law.
At 6:30 am on September 3. 2016, a New York State Trooper observed Morgan’s vehicle on the Taconic State Parkway in the Town of Putnam Valley speeding at upwards of 80 miles per hour. After pulling over the vehicle, the Trooper smelled alcohol on Morgan’s breath, and noticed that Morgan’s eyes were blood shot. After Morgan failed various field sobriety tests he refused to take a chemical breath test and was placed under arrest.
Morgan was convicted by twelve jurors on March 27, 2017. It was his third conviction for DWI, and he is awaiting sentence in Westchester County Court on his fourth DWI conviction.
District Attorney Tendy thanked the New York State Police who stopped and arrested Morgan. “I am very pleased that Brian Morgan, a habitual Driving While Intoxicated offender, was arrested, tried, and sentenced to the maximum term of incarceration. It sends a message to defendants like Morgan that they will be held accountable for the danger they put others in,” Tendy said.
The case was prosecuted by Assistant District Attorney Melissa Lynch.

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